Search results for friday roundup

Happy Friday! Here at TSP headquarters we’re wrapping up our spring semester with research on public outings, collective mothering, and H1-B visa holders and their dependents.

Discoveries:

More Than Just a Walk in the Park,” by Brooke Chambers. New work in Sociological Theory finds that going out in public is influenced by social factors like identity and bias.

Clippings:

Collective Mothering,” by Allison Nobles. Ms. Magazine talks to social scientists about the long history of collective mothering in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

“I Felt Like Destroying Something Beautiful,” by Sandra Loughrin.

Who Gets a Ticket?” by Evan Stewart and Jenn Edwards.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Keeping “Dependents” Dependent,” by Amy Bhatt.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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There’s Research on That!:

The Complexity of Evangelicals in the United States,” by Amber Joy Powell. Sociological research provides a complicated picture of evangelicals in the United States and their beliefs.

The Social Consequences of Conflict,” by Brooke Chambers. Violent conflicts have many consequences, and here we rounded up social science research on their social and relational effects.

Discoveries:

Are Sanctuary Cities Safer than We Think?” by Caity Curry. New research in Justice Quarterly finds that sanctuary policies for immigrants may actually reduce criminal activity and increase police cooperation in these cities.

Clippings:

The Power of Commemorating the Past,” by Brooke Chambers. In a recent article in The ConversationNancy Berns explains the many ways commemorative events can prove beneficial, while also pointing out that not all historical violence is commemorated equally.

Why Marriage Proposals are Stuck in the Past,” by Jasmine Syed. The Atlantic talks with Ellen Lamont and Judy Chu about why marriage proposals often perpetuate traditional gender roles.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Bouncers and Bias,” by Amber Joy Powell.

Contexts:

Young Women of Color and Shifting Sexual Identities,” by Tristan Bridges and Mignon Moore.

All Credentials aren’t Created Equal,” by Louise Seamster.

Anger, Profanity, and Hatred,” by by Audra Buck-Coleman.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Patterns of Progress? Changes in Gender Ideology 1977-2016,” by David Cotter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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There’s Research on That!:

Migration and the U.S. Southern Border,” by Lucas Lynch. Migration on the southern border is a hot topic in U.S. media and politics, so we gathered research on border policies and their impacts on migrants and migration flows.

A Sociological Look at Marijuana and Its Users,” by Neeraj Rajasekar and Ryan Steel. In light of 4/20 or “Weed Day,” we rolled up some research on social processes and marijuana use.

Discoveries:

Systemic Sexism in the Military,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society finds that bureaucracies and male-dominated hierarchies within the U.S. military facilitate discriminatory behavior towards women.

Clippings:

National Geographic’s “New” Take on Race,” by Chloe Hendrix. The Washington Post talks to sociologist Victor Ray about National Geographic‘s “new” conversation about race.

How Wealthy Parents Reproduce College Success,” by Jasmine Syed. The Washington Post features a study by Laura HamiltonJosipa Roksa, and Kelly Nielsen about the role parents play in college students’ success.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

The Sociology Behind the X-Files,” by Isabel Arriagada.

Contexts:

Why Clinton Lost, An Interview with Melissa Harris-Perry,” by Hana Brown.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Negotiating Opportunities for Middle Class Children: An Interview with Jessica McCrory Calarco,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome to the first Friday the 13th of 2018. This week we’ve got new work on gender in waiting rooms, looking “illegal,” and why space matters…physical space, that is. But if you just got excited about UFOs, we’ve got that too!

There’s Research on That!:

What Drives Punitive Attitudes in the United States?” by Caity Curry. We rounded up social science research on social factors that influence Americans’ punitive attitudes.

Why Physical Space Matters for Universities,” by Isabel ArriagadaSocial science research tells us that the way a space is organized matters greatly for the type of experience individuals have at universities and other organizations.

Discoveries:

When Waiting is Women’s Work,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. New research in Sociological Forum finds that men and women in medical waiting rooms interact in ways that conform to gendered expectations and reinforce the conception that men’s time (and work) is more valuable than women’s.

Clippings:

No, Immigrants Don’t Cause Crime,” by Brooke ChambersThe New York Times features research by Robert Adelman and colleagues demonstrating that increases in immigration do not cause increases in crime.

The Sociology Behind the X-Files,” by Isabel ArriagadaNew York Magazine talks to Joseph O. Baker about the social context behind Americans’ beliefs about UFOs.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? News Consumption,” by Ryan Larson, Evan Stewart, and Andrew M. Lindner.

Redefining what it means to be #YourAverageMuslim,” by Inaash Islam.

Contexts:

Looking ‘Illegal’,” by Chandra Reyna.

Gunshops and Crime,” by Eric Stone.

Council on Contemporary Families:

CCF 2018 Conference Report,” by Linda Young.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! This week we’ve got new pieces on how families talk about race (or don’t), what happens when fathers who are primary caregivers go to prison, and why diversity in Hollywood pays off.

There’s Research on That!:

Fashioning Fashion, Creating Couture Part II,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. As a follow-up to part I from last week, we compiled social science research on the ways fashion matters for inequality and identity.

Discoveries:

Families Talk about Race (or Don’t),” by Lucas Lynch. New research in Ethnic and Racial Studies finds that White families lack either the willingness or the ability to talk about race.

Incarcerating Fatherhood” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in Punishment & Society finds that for men serving as primary caregivers before entering prison, fatherhood is a difficult identity to maintain while incarcerated.

Clippings:

Hollywood Diversity Pays Off,” by Nahrissa Rush. NPR reviews Darnell Hunt‘s Hollywood Diversity Report that shows how racial diversity can lead to big payoffs in the entertainment industry.

Understanding Resentment in Rural America,” by Jasmine Syed. Vox talks to  Robert Wuthnow about resentment in predominantly White, rural towns in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What Makes Prejudice Trend on Twitter?” by Brooke Chambers.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Here Comes Arielle Kuperberg,” by Virginia Rutter.

Social Studies MN:

Politics, Public Discourse and the Press,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hi Folks! Evan here, subbing in for your usual Friday roundup from Allison Nobles. Read on for the latest social science on everything from big money and body cameras to student activists and a smash stage production in the Twin Cities. Happy Friday!

There’s Research on That!:

When Youth Become Activists,” by Amber Joy Powell. Youth play a vital role in shaping social movements. Sociological studies on movements and young people’s mobilization help us understand the energy behind their activism.

Discoveries:

Big Money Bridging the Political Divide,” by Evan Stewart. New research in American Journal of Sociology shows how longtime donors are more bipartisan than we think.

Clippings:

Why Poor Parents Say “Yes” to Junk Food,” by Nahrissa Rush. In a recent op-ed for the Los Angeles Times, Priya Fielding-Singh explains that junk food consumption is an emotionally-rooted decision for impoverished parents.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Are We Really Looking at Body Cameras?” by Evan Stewart

Contexts:

Auditing macroeconomic data production,” by Andrew Kerner and Charles Crabtree

Council on Contemporary Families:

Three Questions for Trevor Hoppe on Punishing Disease” by Arielle Kuperberg

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got social science research on first-generation students and the crisis in higher education, new research on how anti-immigrant groups exaggerate immigration projections, and sociological perspectives on the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia.

There’s Research on That!:

Push for Completion May Harm First-Generation Students,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. In response to University of Wisconsin-Superior’s recent decision to cut academic programs, we rounded up research to discuss how these decisions may affect first-generation students.

Discoveries:

Exaggerating Immigration on the Internet,” by Lucas Lynch. New research in Social Problems investigates how anti-immigrant groups manipulate immigration projections in the United States.

Clippings:

How Do We Talk about Sexual Violence?” by Allison NoblesVox talks to Heather Hlavka about the language we use to describe and define sexual violence.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Pod Panic & Social Problems,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Virginia is for Lovers,” by Gretchen Livingston, Peter Wallenstein, Angela Gonzales, and Christopher Bonastia.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Millennials, Gender, and a More Open Society,” by Barbara J. Risman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday Everyone! This week we’ve got some new pieces on parole revocations and Alabama’s special election, as well as revisits from 2017 on the immigration-crime paradox and gender gaps in tenure promotion.

There’s Research on That!:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

The Immigration-Crime Paradox,” by Ryan Larson. Research shows that even though immigrants and the areas they inhabit are associated with lower levels of crime, both documented and undocumented individuals are more likely to be incarcerated and receive longer prison sentences.

Discoveries:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

Biased Evaluations Contribute to Gender Gaps in Tenure Promotion,” by Amber Joy Powell. A new study in Social Forces explores why female academics have a harder time achieving tenure promotion than their male peers.

Clippings:

Violations of Parole Supervision Increase Prison Time,” by Caity CurryShawn Bushwayand David Harding talk to The Conversation about how violations of parole conditions appear to be a key driver of high prison populations, rather than new offenses.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

In Alabama’s Special Election, What about the Men?” by Mairead Eastin Moloney.

Contexts:

On Culture, Politics, and Poverty,” by Lawrence M. Eppard, Noam Chomsky, Mark R. Rank, and David Brady.

Pushes and Pulls for Professional Women,” by Mary DeStefano.

Self-fulfilling status?” by Shilpa Venkatraman.

Friends in Low Places,” by Shaun Genter.

Parents’ Faith brings Friendship,” by  Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Where the Millennials Will Take Us: A New Generation Wrestles with the Gender Structure,” by Barbara J. Risman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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If you you’re avoiding Black Friday shopping, recovering from a big meal, or just need some sociology in your life, we have the gobbledy-goods! This week we have new research on beliefs about meritocracy in the United States and China, social science on the meanings of “white supremacy,” and reflections on the role of private schools for inequality in higher education.

There’s Research on That!:

What is ‘White Supremacy’?” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science helps us parse out different meanings of the phrase,”white supremacy.”

Discoveries:

Who Believes in Bootstraps?” by Lucas Lynch. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that Chinese are more likely than Americans to believe hard work is not the only key to success, despite both countries having long histories of meritocracy.

Clippings:

Will Private Schools Pay Up?” by Evan StewartThe New York Times talked with Charlie Eaton about how private schools play a part in inequality in higher education.

 

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Season’s Greetings from America’s Men,” by D’Lane R. Compton.

Silencing Sexual Harassment Complaints in Pakistan and the US,” by Fauzia Husain.

 

Social Studies MN:

Chatbots, Mobile Apps, and the Future of Journalism,” by Allison J. Steinke.

 

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: A Review of National Crime Victim Victimization Findings on Rape and Sexual Assault,” by  Jessica L. Wheeler.

Revisit: Women not enrolled in Four-Year Universities and Colleges Have Higher Risk of Sexual Assault,” by Jennifer Barber, Yasamin Kusunoki, and and Jamie Budnick.

 

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Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got new pieces on poverty penalties in the penal system, the benefits of DACA, and CrossFit bodies in a bodyless world. See below for that and other great new stuff from around the site this week.

There’s Research on That!:

Poverty Penalties in the U.S. Penal System,” by Isabel Arriagada. Research demonstrates the far-reaching consequences of the penal system’s money leveraging strategies.

Understanding Debates about DACA,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Research shows that repealing DACA will have adverse impacts on recipients’ health and well-being.

Discoveries:

Disability, Support, and Strain in Intimate Relationships,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. New research in Journal of Health and Social Behavior finds that men and women navigate disability in intimate relationships differently.

Clippings:

Just How Violent is the United States?” by Caity Curry. The Washington Post talks to Kieran Healy about how rates of violence vary across social contexts.

Shifting Standards in Campus Sexual Assault Cases,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellasMiriam Gleckman-Krut and Nicole Bedera explain controversies over who gets to define campus rape in the New York Times.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Thank You, Angela Robinson: A Review Of Professor Marston and The Wonder Women,” by Mimi Schippers.

When Home is Where the Hazards Are,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Google Searches Show More Worry Over Gay Men and Boys than Over Gay Women and Girls,” by Emma Mishel and Mónica L. Caudillo.

Where Punishment and Pregnancy Meet,” by Megan Comfort.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Segregation by Sexuality in the United States,” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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