Search results for friday roundup

On the road again…

Greetings from Chicago, temporary TSP HQ! As dear Doug is off electrifying the Fargo-Moorhead area with his insights into Midnight Basketball and its neoliberal underpinnings, Chris and I are in the City of Broad Shoulders attempting to, I suppose, look broad (posture helps) at the American Society of Criminology meetings. We’re all dumbstruck at the presence of Stephen Pinker and have seen standing room only attendance at many sessions, even when wonderful restaurants and great sights tempt from just outside the conference hotel. At meetings like these, we get a certain jolt of rededication to TSP, meeting with authors as excited about open-access, de-jargon-ified (I’m an editor, let’s call that a word now) social science as we are. Here’s hoping for many very busy Friday Roundups to come, building on the conversations we’re all having on the road. more...

Election? Where?

After last week’s flurry of activity, perhaps a rush to get information to our eager readership (indulge me here) before the American general election that’s now just a few days past (unless you happen to live in Florida), things at The Society Pages have returned to a more reasonable, measured pace. That isn’t, however, to say we’ve gone slack; indeed, this week has brought a broad look at the underpinnings of and possible challenges to power, alongside thoughtful teaching activities and solid advice on just what color tracksuit your dog or cat might require. There’s a lot going on—have a look! more...

Say, Can I Offer You Some Social Science?

As The Society Pages’ associate editor, I’m in a position to see nearly all of the fantastic content that comes across our transom every day, but it’s recently been pointed out that we don’t offer a super simple way for readers to do the same. To that end, I present the first of our (hopefully) weekly Friday Roundups.

This week, we’ve seen a lot of new work, much of it dealing with next week’s U.S. general election, but with some “palate cleansers,” too. Here are all of this week’s articles from across TSP’s departments, as well as a few highlights from our Community Pages. more...

RU021315Not at all spooky, but always “soc-y.”

There’s Research on That!

Justifying Our Love,” by Jacqui Frost. Americans love love, even when it hurts. How have love and culture mingled to create modern “love”? Frost brings research from Eva Illouz, Ann Swidler, Francesca Cancian, and Anthony Giddens.

Vexed by Vaccination Refusals,” by Caty Taborda. Research on distrust of science and vaccinations, as well as network ties that spread medical knowledge—and sometimes skew it along the way.

The Editors’ Desk:

The New Yorker: Champion of Serious Sociology,” by Doug Hartmann. Admiring the work of Kelefa Sanneh, Jill Lepore, and Adam Gopnik, who are all bringing sociology’s big ideas to the Big Apple.

Give Methods a Chance:

Amy Schalet on In-Depth Interviews,” with Kyle Green. A leading sociologist on the methodology behind a time-consuming, but very rewarding, research technique.

Citings & Sightings:

Books Behind Bars: College Courses in Prisons,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Using reading for rehabilitation.

Could Porn Lead to Sex Trafficking?” by Caty Taborda. One researcher argues a correlation between consumption of pornography and demand for sex trafficking.

The Anti-Vaxxer Vote,” by Caty Taborda. Does vaccination refusal break along party lines?

Cheats in Cleats,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. When sports scandals break, are they amplified by public notions of sport as an almost sacred space?

Workplaces May Create Inequalities at Home,” by Caty Taborda. Bringing work home has more than one meaning.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Valentine’s Day Fact Sheet on Healthy Sex,” by Adina Nack.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Schools Adopting Digital Tools Without Evidence that They Boost Student Achievement,” by Patricia Burch, Annalee Good, Caroly J. Heinrich, and Chandi Wagner.

A Few from the Community Pages:

RU033114Okay, let’s be real. It’s not Friday. But wouldn’t that be fun? We could annoy ourselves with that Rebecca Black song, merrily chirp “T.G.I.F.!” at passers-by, and dream of our weekend plans… none of which I was doing this past Friday, when I was so mired in work I couldn’t look ahead, let alone behind to sum up the week on TSP. Now’s the time for a little reflection!

Features:

Same-Sex, Different Attitudes,” by Kathleen Hull. A lot’s changed in just a few years—why are American attitudes on same-sex marriage moving so quickly? more...

Ru031614Sometimes, time gets away from you! As does debt, as shown in this week’s contribution from Dr. Jason Houle, showing the increase and changes in debt over three generations. Other things that can get away from you: March Madness (I mean, it’s called Madness), the reproduction of sexism and racism, and parental worry.

Features:

Out of the Nest and Into the Red,” by Jason N. Houle. Three generations of debt reveal changing ideals and life courses. Oh, and debt. more...

RU042613Clear Points, Full Hearts, Can’t Lose

When the media flat-out gets your research wrong or presses it into service in an argument that’s the opposite of what you’ve found, it’s hard to get stoked about taking journalists’ calls. But, as pay walls become costlier and less permeable, I’ve got one key, if difficult, bit of academic advice: start giving away the punchline.

Your abstract is now your calling card. “I present findings, discuss implications, and suggest directions for future research” is not a sufficient closing sentence when you may only have 250 words to say what your paper is about, what makes it special, what it actually means. This is to say, if you’re not clearly giving away information in the one place you can*, it’s your fault if others get it wrong. Of course, they still might use your findings in really dumb ways. No controlling that. more...

Happy Friday! This week we cover new research that examines the reasons for the slowdown in casual hookups. As always, our partner and community pages featured important and interesting pieces on the racial consequences of underfunding public universities, the obligation mothers feel towards their children, and the significance of public naming of genocide.

Discoveries

The Slowdown in Hookups by Hannah Schwendeman. We present new research that examines the relationship between alcohol, media use, and living arrangements on decreases in young adults’ casual sex.

From Our Partners:

Contexts

Broke: The Racial Consequences of Underfunding Public Universities with Laura Hamilton, Kelly Nielsen, and Victor Ray

Council on Contemporary Families

“It’s My Responsibility, Nobody Else”: Doing Motherhood by Joan Maya Mazelis

From Our Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

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TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday! This week we cover new research that explores the challenges freelancers face when looking for full-time jobs. We also explore what sociology, and other social sciences, can tell us about the social influences of intergenerational trauma.

Discoveries

Freelancers Face Frustration in Full-Time Job Searches by Jean Marie Maier. We cover new research that shows that a history of freelancing sends negative signals about commitment and competence to potential employers.

There’s Research On That

When Trauma is Passed Down by Nikoleta Sremac. We round up research that explores the cultural legacy of trauma for social groups.

From Our Partners:

Contexts

What Do Memes Tell Us about Self and Time during the Pandemic? by Michael G. Flaherty and Cosima Rughiniș

Council on Contemporary Families

The Shortest Distance is Across Not Around: Bridging Chasms in Women’s Health Care and Racial Justice to Achieve Maternal Health Equity by Irene Headen

From Our Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

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TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday! This week we welcomed a new community page, covered new research on sanctuary policies and crime reporting, and rounded up research on inequalities in access to mental health care.

Editor’s Desk

Introducing World Suffering on TSP. This week we announced that TSP is the new host for the website World Suffering and the Compassionate Relief of Suffering, the work of our late colleague Ron Anderson. You can find out more about the site, and Ron’s legacy, here.

Discoveries

Seeking Justice in Sanctuary Cities by Jillian LaBranche. We present new research that shows Latinx people are more likely to report crime victimization in communities with sanctuary policies.

There’s Research On That

Inequality and Access to Mental Health Care by Mahala Miller. We round up research on the persistent challenges to equitable access to mental health care.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families

New Work: Gender, Parenting, and the Rise of Remote Work During the Pandemic: Implications for Domestic Inequality in the United States by Allison Dunatchik, Kathleen Gerson, Jennifer Glass, Jerry A. Jacobs, and Haley Strizel.

From Our Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

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TSP Edited Volumes