Search results for friday roundup

Happy Friday! As you gear up for Halloween weekend check out our most recent posts on the social science of genetic testing, how some groups become “white,” and the ways local differences shape women’s incarceration rates in Oklahoma.

There’s Research on That!:

How Grown-Up Careers are Like Middle School Dances” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Research shows gender segregation in work results both from self-selection and discriminatory workplace practices.

‘Whiteness’ in American Immigration Politics” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Sociological research reminds us that some “white” groups were once racial outsiders in the United States.

Discoveries:

The Social Side of Genetic Testing” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in the American Journal of Sociology finds that a variety of factors influence how scientists understand the relationship between genetics and disease.

Clippings:

Who Really Benefits from “Diversity” Policies?” by Neeraj RajasekarThe New Yorker draws on research by Ellen Berrey and Natasha Warikoo on the unintended consequences of promoting diversity.

How Local Differences Influence Incarceration Rates in Oklahoma” by Lucas LynchReveal talked to Susan Sharp about how county differences influence variation in incarceration rates and sentencing severity for women in Oklahoma.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

College pays…if you’re white” by Evan Stewart.

Monuments to the Racist “Heroes” of the North” by Abraham Gutman.

Social Studies MN:

The Color of Quality of Life in Nursing Homes” by  Sarah Catherine Billups.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: The Trouble with Averages” by Virginia Rutter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello hello! Friday the 13th got you looking over your shoulder? Don’t worry, sociology’s got your back. This week we’ve got new sociological takes on why we honor indigenous peoples’ day, how stereotypes discredit children’s testimonies, and problems with public perceptions of ‘sociological gobbledygook.’

There’s Research on That!:

Why We Honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day,” by Allison Nobles. Social science research helps us understand the underlying gender and racial components of colonial settlement in the United States.

‘Sociological Gobbledygook’ and Public Distrust of Social Science Experts,” by Isabel Arriagada. In light of Chief Justice John Roberts’ comments about “sociological gobbledygook,” we rounded up research on public distrust of social science.

Discoveries:

How Stereotypes Discredit Children’s Testimonies,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society finds that children of color confront cultural narratives that have the potential to produce unjust outcomes in the courtroom.

Clippings:

Linking Christian Nationalism and Intolerance,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas.  ThinkProgess talked to numerous sociologists about the ways Christian nationalism interacts with other ideologies.

Do Americans Care About Income Inequality?” by Nahrissa Rush. The Washington Post draws on a report from Leslie McCall and Jennifer A. Richeson that knowledge of inequality leads many Americans to develop skepticism about economic opportunity.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Representing Race in Fashion Media,” by Alyssa Scull.

A Bipartisan Pay Gap in Presidential Administrations,” by Evan Stewart.

Bias and Opportunity for Immigrants in the Legal Profession,” by Alisha Kirchoff and Vitor Martins Dias.

Contexts:

When the U.S. Sneezes, Puerto Rico Already has a Cold,” by Fernando I. Rivera and Elizabeth Aranda.

Seven Things Social Science Tells Us About Natural Disasters,” by Hannah Cash, Kelsey Drotning, and Paige Miller.

Social Studies MN:

The Political Divide Between Immigrants and Refugees,” by Lucas Lynch.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Families and DACA,” by Luilly Gonzalez.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday all. This week we’ve got new pieces on the varied meanings of nostalgia, the problems with media discourse surrounding mass shootings, and new data on racial biases in policing.

There’s Research on That!:

Mass Shootings and the Media,” by Amber Joy Powell. In light of yet another horrifying mass shooting, we look to research on how social contexts influence how the media frames these violent events.

Nostalgia Is Not What It Used to Be,” by Yagmur Karakaya and Jacqui Frost. Rapid technological changes have many looking to the past, and while social science research on nostalgia warns against idealizing the past, it also points to varied uses and meanings of nostalgia over time.

Clippings:

Preserving the Purpose of NFL Protests,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellasRashawn Ray and Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve remind us that the NFL protests stem from racial biases in policing.

When Think Tanks Tank Research,” by Evan StewartNPR talks to Thomas Medvetz about partisan interests and organizational conflict in think tanks.

Sociological Images

Thoughts, Prayers, and Political Skeptics,” by Evan Stewart

Contexts:

Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter,” by Rory Kramer, Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles.

And a Few from our Community Pages:

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Happy Friday all! This week we’ve got a new feature on the sociology of joy and some new regular features on grandparental wealth and emboldened “fringe” ideologies. See below or stop by the site for more.

Special Feature:

A Sociology of Joy,” by Dan Brook. In our latest feature, Dr. Brook explores the possibility of a “serendipitous sociology” that properly situates happiness in social contexts.

Discoveries:

Inheriting Academic Success: Grandparental Wealth and Student GPAs,” by Brooke Chambers. New research in American Sociological Review finds that, when compared, parents and grandparents wealth had almost equal effects on student success.

Clippings:

Emboldening “Fringe” Ideologies,” by Neeraj RajasekarTina Fetner and Sarah Sobieraj talk to the New York Times about how quickly “fringe” ideologies can find their way into mainstream culture.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

What Does Studying College Sex Tell Us About Immigrant Assimilation?” by Kristine Wang, Jessie Ford, and Paula England.

The [Un]surprising Alt-right,” by Robert Futrell and Pete Simi.

Council on Contemporary Families:

For African Americans, Grief and Loss Starting as Children,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday all! This week we’ve got sociological takes on the “glocalization” of soccer, trans admittance policies at women’s colleges, and Trump’s fluid masculinities. See all that and more below.

There’s Research on That!:

The “Glocalization” of Soccer in America,” by Edgar Campos. When the global and the local meet, aspects of a global game that many fans adore can be overshadowed by local flare.

Discoveries:

How Women’s Colleges Construct Gender,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society looks at the ways trans students are selectively admitted into women’s colleges.

Clippings:

How Businesses Benefit From Immigrant Exploitation,” by Edgar Campos. The Huffington Post looks to Tanya Golash-Boza to explain the “immigrant industrial complex” in the U.S.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Kids Today: New Data on Teens, Sex, and Contraceptive Use,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday all. This week we’ve got some great new pieces on the geography of punishment, the perennial disappointments of professional sports fans, and five viewpoints on whitewashing the working class.

There’s Research on That!:

How Geography Structures Punishment,” by Veronica Horowitz. Reflecting on the new public tool “Measures for Justice,” we look at the importance of geography in structuring disadvantage and procedural justice.

Discoveries:

Coping Strategies Among Undocumented Young Adults,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Social Problems finds that networking with peers of similar legal statuses may help empower young undocumented adults to develop positive coping strategies.

Clippings:

Everyday Racism in Canada,” by Neeraj RajasekarThe Miami Herald talks to Cheryl Teelucksingh about the resurgence of everyday racism in Canada.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Viewpoints: Whitewashing the Working Class

Photographs of the Mind,” by Mark Andres.

Success and Failure in Framing Social Movements,” by Danielle Koonce.

How Grown Siblings Divide Care Work,” by Carrie Clarady.

Long-term Job Insecurity is Depressing,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Marriage and the Genetic Risk of Depression,” by Justin Maietta.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: Yo! Is this the author of This Chair Rocks?,” by Molly McNulty.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hey everyone! We were out last Friday, so we have a lot of great new stuff to share with you this week. We’ve got new sociological takes on the history of sex ed policy, the role of women in boxing, and the ways heterosexual couples negotiate whose career to prioritize. See all that and more below!

There’s Research on That!:

Pugilism and Power: The Stigma of Women in Boxing,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. A play about early boxing great Barbara Buttrick recently premiered in the U.K., and it has important implications for how we think about gender and sport.

Sex Ed and its Discontents,” by Allison Nobles. It’s still unclear how the Trump administration will handle sex education policy, but research on past policies reveals the ways sex ed is used to regulate sexuality, especially among black and Latino youth.

Discoveries:

Career Opportunities and Sacrifices among Heterosexual Couples,” by Edgar Campos. Despite perceived gains in gender equality at home and at work, new research in Gender & Society finds that many heterosexual couples continue to reproduce traditional gender roles in negotiating whose career to prioritize.

Disproving Stereotypes about Spending in Black Households,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. New research in Sociology of Race and Ethnicity finds that blacks spend far less than whites on “frivolous” items like new iPhones and more on the long-term costs of maintaining a household.

Clippings:

The Profits and Perils of Mug Shots in a Digital Age,” by Caity CurryThe Marshall Project talks to TSP alum Sarah Esther Lageson to explain the impacts of public mug shots on arrestees.

The Extremely Low Chance of Extremism,’ by Neeraj Rajasekar. Despite increased fears of terrorist acts, Charles Kurzman tells NPR that extremism is relatively rare.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Class Differences in Women’s Cohabitation in Early Adulthood,” by Mónica L. Caudillo, Paula England, and Eliza Brown.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Asian/Americans, Education, and Crime,” by Tasia Clemons.

CCF Gender and Millennials Online Symposium: Overview,” by Stephanie Coontz.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! This week we’ve got sociological takes on the limits of lobbying, the ways neighborhood racial composition affects exercise, and myths and facts for Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. All that and more below.

There’s Research on That!:

The Leverage and Limits of Lobbying in the United States,” by Shucheng Zhou, Kelly McCarthy, and Nicholas Bartlett. This guest TROT by students at Oberlin College details the different types and varied effectiveness of lobbying activities in the U.S.

Discoveries:

Jogging While Black,” by Caty Taborda-WhittRashawn Ray recently published an article in Social Science Research that explores how neighborhood racial composition acts as either a barrier or incentive to exercising outside.

Clippings:

Why Music Festivals Are All Starting to Look the Same,” by Caity Curry. The Washington Post asks Johnathan Wynn to explain how growing commercialization and consolidation may diminish the quality of the musical experience for festival-goers.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Myths and Facts for Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month,” by Nancy McArdle, Maura Baldiga, Pamela Joshi and Dolores Acevedo-Garcia.

Contexts:

Cobesity,” by Sven E. Wilson.

Obesity, Gender, and Immigrant Generations,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Who Do You Think You Are?” by Justin Maietta.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! This week we have a number of pieces on gender inequality at work, at home, and even on vacation, a few new pieces on private prisons and policing, and sociological takes on March Madness, fake news, and shifting sexual practices. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

For Profit Prisons and the Immigrant Industrial Complex,” by Caity Curry. Private prisons have been reinstated, so we rounded up research on how they enable mass incarceration of immigrant populations.

The Social Science of Sexual Practices,” by Allison Nobles. A recent survey reported that Americans are having less sex. But, so what? Why should we care how often people are having sex or who their sexual partners are? You got it — there’s research on that!

Gendering Vacation,” by Sarah Catherine Billups and Allison Nobles. It may be spring break time for many, but women pay a higher price for taking time off work.

Discoveries:

Highly Skilled White Women Pay the Biggest Motherhood Penalty,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in American Sociological Review finds privilege has its price in the form of high motherhood penalties.

Clippings:

The “Ferguson Effect” and Informed Policing,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. The New York Times talks to David C. Pyrooz about a different kind of Ferguson effect.

Why Fewer Millennials Support Gender Equality in the Home,” Edgar CamposTime covers Joanna Pepin and colleagues’ research on the changing gender attitudes of millennials.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Scorn Wars: Rural White People and Us,” by Nina Eliasoph.

The Sadness of the Border Wall,” by David Bacon.

How the Media Makes Protests Matter,” by Polina Zvavitch.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Trending Towards Traditionalism? Changes in Youths’ Gender Ideology,” by Joanna R. Pepin and David A. Cotter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday all. This week we’ve got a number of new pieces on religion, some reflections on how to influence public policy, and even a little sociology in outer space!

Office Hours:

Mimi Schippers on Polyamory and Polyqueer Sexualities,” with Allison Nobles. In this episode, we chat with Schippers about her new book and the ways “compulsory monogamy” limits how we experience relationships.

There’s Research on That!:

Do Politicians Listen When Constituents Call?,” by Erik Kojola. We round up research on the pros and cons of contacting legislators as a way to change social policy.

Outer Space and Earthly Inequalities,” by Jacqui Frost. It may require rocket science to get to space, but social science is beginning to weigh in on what it might mean for social life if we continue to commodify and colonize outer space.

Discoveries:

The Ordinary Side of Charismatic Leadership,” by Jacqui Frost. New research in Sociology of Religion finds that leaders of megachurches often embody a particular kind of charisma that blends the ordinary and the extraordinary.

Clippings:

How Sociology Can Contribute to Public Policy,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. The New York Times talks to a number of sociologists in this piece about the uneven distribution of economics and sociology in public policy discussions.

Sex Breaks and Employee Satisfaction in Sweden,” by Edgar CamposLotta Dellve talks to the New York Times about the potential of sex breaks to increase employee productivity and satisfaction.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Institutionalizing Prison Reentry,” by Brittany Dernberger.

Not Making Mom Proud,” by Nicole Bedera.

The Complex Path to Secular Identity,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Black Names Aren’t That Simple,” by Moriah Willow.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Opioids, Health Care Denial, and a World of Pain,” by Megan Peterson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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