Search results for friday roundup

Happy Friday. This week we rounded-up research on women in combat sports and the politics of public memorials. As always, our partner and community pages also bring you great content.

There’s Research On That

A Woman’s Place is in the Octagon by Jillian LaBranche. We round-up research on how women in combat sports confront gender norms.

The Politics of Public Memorials by Daniel Cueto-Villalobos. We review research on public memorials, from immediate to official, highlighting the contested nature of these public projects.

From Our Partners:

Contexts

Cross University Collaboration for STEM Education and Social Justice by Monica J. Carter, Luis A. Colón, Anna De Cheke Qualls, Kamla Deonauth, and Panos S. Shiakolas

Council on Contemporary Families

New Work: African American mothers’ racial stressors are related to their parenting and adolescents’ academic and behavioral outcomes by Kathleen Holloway, Fatima Varner, and Stephen T. Russell

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Happy Friday! This week we rounded-up research on the historical roots of racialized mass incarceration and covered a new article about the power of framing pornography as addictive.

There’s Research On That

Historical Roots of Racialized Mass Incarceration by Hannah Schwendeman. We overviewed social scientific research that helps us understand the historical basis of racialized mass incarceration.

Discoveries

The Power of “Porn Addiction” by Mahala Miller. We feature new research that shows how understandings of pornography as “addictive” help justify judgements about sexuality and gender.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images

Happy Birthday, W. E. B. Du Bois! by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families

Parents of the 1920s set the stage for today’s intensive parenting by Richard A. Settersten Jr., Glen H. Elder Jr., and Lisa D. Pearce.

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Happy Friday! This week, we rounded up research on how multilevel marketing intersects with culture, gender, and inequality. Our partner and community featured content on the hidden nature of class, private safety nets, civil resistance, and a review of “the New Black Sociologists.”

There’s Research On That

Culture, Inequality, and Multilevel Marketing by Daniel Cueto-Villalobos. We round up research on how the promises of multi-level marketing square with its reality showcasing how MLM’s history intersects with gender and economic inequality.

From Our Partners:

Contexts

Rediscovering Voices in Uncertain Times by Aya Waller-Bey

Council on Contemporary Families

New Work: “I’d rather be hungry:” Why some people don’t want to ask for help by Joan Maya Mazelis

Sociological Images

The Mask of the “Middle Class” by Evan Stewart

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Happy Friday! After some technical difficulties early in the week, we brought you a timely round-up of research on waiting and cover some new research on how gendered care work affects anxiety about covid-19. Plus, as always, great content from our partners and community pages.

There’s Research on That:

We All Hate to Wait; Research Explains Why by Nick Mathews. We round up research on why we hate waiting, how technology helps us pass the time, and power and inequality in waiting.

Discoveries:

Care Works Matters for Covid Worry by Mahala Miller. We cover new research by Janani Umamaheswar  and Catherine Tan that finds that differences in care work responsibilities underlie disparities in men and women’s covid worry.

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Council on Contemporary Families:

Is Denmark a Feminist Utopia? Lessons about gender from the Danish TV show “Borgen.” by Barbara Risman

Contexts:

Fall 2020 letter from the editors by Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas

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Happy Friday! This week we cover new research that shows we worry more about the risk-taking of loved ones than ourselves and round-up research on online dating’s potential and entrenchment of existing inequality.

There’s Research on That:

Inequality and Opportunity in Online Dating by Mahala Miller. We round up research on online dating that shows that it expands the dating pool for some while reproducing inequality and assortive mating more broadly.

Discoveries:

“I Really Don’t Want You to Do That” by Erika Sanborne. We feature new research that shows we are more concerned about our significant others’ taking risks than we are about ourselves taking the same risks.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Do the Media’s “Sexy Girl” Messages Trump Their “Girl Power” Ones? by Virginia Rutter.

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Happy Friday to all! This week we bring you new research on the racial wealth gap for families with children and cover recent scholarship on the connection between politics and rising hate crimes against Black and Latinx people.

Discoveries:

Racial Wealth Gaps Even Worse for Black Families with Kids” by Jean Marie Maier. New research shows the extent of the racial wealth gap following the Great Recession, particularly between White and Black families with kids.

Politics and the Rise in Hate Crimes Against Black and Latinx People” by Jillian LaBranche. We summarize new research that shows politicians’ actions are linked to rising hate crimes for both Black and Latinx people but the nature of this connection differs.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

3Q: Men who have affairs: An Interview with Alicia Walker” by Arielle Kuperberg.

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Happy Friday! This week we rounded-up research on food insecurity among students, highlighted our colleagues at the Gender Policy Report’s new issue on gender and guns, and celebrate the incredible accomplishments of our esteemed editor, Chris Uggen.

There’s Research on That:

Food Insecurity among U.S. Students – and How the COVID-19 Pandemic is Making It Worse” by Hannah Schwendeman. We round up research on food insecurity among students, from elementary to college, and consider how the pandemic has exacerbated the situation.

Features:

“Guns and Gender in America,” from Gender Policy Report by Nikoleta Sremac. We highlight the important and interesting pieces featured in the Gender Policy Report’s new issue on gender and guns.

Editors’ Desk:

“Kudos to Chris” by Doug Hartmann. From a mention in this week’s judiciary committee confirmation hearings, to publishing a new Sentencing Project report, Doug reflects on the recent accomplishments of his co-editor.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

“A Restorative Justice Approach to Campus Sexual Misconduct” by David R. Karp.

Sociological Images:

Sociology IRL” by Evan Stewart.

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Happy Friday! This week we add three more special features to our Wonderful/Wretched series on racial dynamics in the Twin Cities. We also bring you a special feature investigating changes in public opinion about the Black Lives Matter movement, an interview with a prominent Harvard sociologist, and an examination of trends in happiness.

Special Features:

Wonderful/Wretched Memories of Racial Dynamics in the Twin Cities, Minnesota” by Walter R. Jacobs. In this series, social scientists with ties to the Twin Cities share their stories and reflections about experiencing race in the “Land of 10,000 Lakes.”

If you are a social scientist who also has ties to the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul but now lives elsewhere, we’d love to include your stories as a component of this collective action. Stories from White social scientists as well as from social scientists of color are welcome, as we aspire to document the full range of experiences of the racial dynamics of the Twin Cities. Please send your reflections to Walt Jacobs at walt.jacobs@sjsu.edu.

In “Protests and Pandemic Jolt Public Opinion,” Ron Anderson examines the factors contributing to dizzying shifts in American attitudes toward the Black Lives Matter movement.

The Fire This Time,” a reprint from the Harvard Gazette by staff writer Christina Pazzanese, features a deep and wide-ranging interview with sociologist Lawrence D. Bobo about police killings of black men, racial bigotry, and violence.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Challenges Facing Cohabiting Couples Differ from those of Married Couples in this Crisis” by Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler.

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? The Happiness Drop” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Police Officers Need Liability Insurance” by Rarkimm Fields.

#courageisbeautiful but PPE is Better: White Supremacy, Racial Capitalism, and COVID-19” by Jean Beaman and Catherine J. Taylor.

Intimacy on the Mats and in the Surf” by Kyle Green and Clifton Evers.

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Happy Friday! This week, we feature a guest post on the UFC; a reflection on TSP, community, and belonging; and new research on hip hop. We also share sociological accounts of Covid caretaking and the illusion-destroying power of the pandemic.

Features:

In “Refusing to Throw in the Towel,” Kyle Green and Nancy Kidder examine the story of the UFC’s decision to resume fighting and what it reveals about the social pressures sporting organizations face in returning to action.

The Editors’ Desk:

In “Ode to TSP,” graduate editor Allison Nobles shares a heartfelt reflection on her time at the helm of The Society Pages.

Discoveries:

Emcees and Communities, Black Placemaking as Artist-Shaping” by Neeraj Rajasekar. We bring you new research exploring how hip hop artists build community resilience and solidarity as they bring their artistic visions to life.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Connecting Crises of Carework in the Era of Coronavirus” by Amber Crowell and Jennifer Randles.

From Our Community Pages:

Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies discusses connections between Wilhelm II’s Germany and Trump’s USA.

A Backstage Sociologist explores how the pandemic serves to remind us of the human condition.

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Happy Friday! This week, we feature new research on stereotypes and reporting, algorithms used to drive policy, and the importance of Census data for understanding race, diversity, and inequality.

Discoveries:

Traffic Accident Reporting Drives Gender Stereotypes” by Jean Marie Maier. We bring you new research investigating how gender stereotypes about bad drivers are perpetuated by the media.

Algorithmic Blues: Accuracy Versus Morality in Policy Debates” by Mahala Miller. New research explores how policymakers feel about insurance companies’ use of credit scores to predict prices–one consequential example of a predictive algorithm used to set policy.

There’s Research on That:

A #TSPClassics Collection: The Sociology of the Census” by Neeraj Rajasekar. We round up research on the history and methods of conducting the Census, and how social scientists have used Census data in research and theory-building.

From Our Partners:

Contexts

Con Corazón San Antonio” by Fabio Rojas.

Healthcare and Critical Infrastructure” by Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

COVID-19 Impact on Asia and Beyond” by Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

Council on Contemporary Families

Online learning will be hard for kids whose schools close – and the digital divide will make it even harder for some of them” by Jessica Calarco.

From Our Community Pages:

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