Search results for friday roundup

Happy Friday! This week we rounded-up research on food insecurity among students, highlighted our colleagues at the Gender Policy Report’s new issue on gender and guns, and celebrate the incredible accomplishments of our esteemed editor, Chris Uggen.

There’s Research on That:

Food Insecurity among U.S. Students – and How the COVID-19 Pandemic is Making It Worse” by Hannah Schwendeman. We round up research on food insecurity among students, from elementary to college, and consider how the pandemic has exacerbated the situation.

Features:

“Guns and Gender in America,” from Gender Policy Report by Nikoleta Sremac. We highlight the important and interesting pieces featured in the Gender Policy Report’s new issue on gender and guns.

Editors’ Desk:

“Kudos to Chris” by Doug Hartmann. From a mention in this week’s judiciary committee confirmation hearings, to publishing a new Sentencing Project report, Doug reflects on the recent accomplishments of his co-editor.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

“A Restorative Justice Approach to Campus Sexual Misconduct” by David R. Karp.

Sociological Images:

Sociology IRL” by Evan Stewart.

From Our Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday! This week we add three more special features to our Wonderful/Wretched series on racial dynamics in the Twin Cities. We also bring you a special feature investigating changes in public opinion about the Black Lives Matter movement, an interview with a prominent Harvard sociologist, and an examination of trends in happiness.

Special Features:

Wonderful/Wretched Memories of Racial Dynamics in the Twin Cities, Minnesota” by Walter R. Jacobs. In this series, social scientists with ties to the Twin Cities share their stories and reflections about experiencing race in the “Land of 10,000 Lakes.”

If you are a social scientist who also has ties to the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul but now lives elsewhere, we’d love to include your stories as a component of this collective action. Stories from White social scientists as well as from social scientists of color are welcome, as we aspire to document the full range of experiences of the racial dynamics of the Twin Cities. Please send your reflections to Walt Jacobs at walt.jacobs@sjsu.edu.

In “Protests and Pandemic Jolt Public Opinion,” Ron Anderson examines the factors contributing to dizzying shifts in American attitudes toward the Black Lives Matter movement.

The Fire This Time,” a reprint from the Harvard Gazette by staff writer Christina Pazzanese, features a deep and wide-ranging interview with sociologist Lawrence D. Bobo about police killings of black men, racial bigotry, and violence.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Challenges Facing Cohabiting Couples Differ from those of Married Couples in this Crisis” by Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler.

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? The Happiness Drop” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Police Officers Need Liability Insurance” by Rarkimm Fields.

#courageisbeautiful but PPE is Better: White Supremacy, Racial Capitalism, and COVID-19” by Jean Beaman and Catherine J. Taylor.

Intimacy on the Mats and in the Surf” by Kyle Green and Clifton Evers.

From Our Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday! This week, we feature a guest post on the UFC; a reflection on TSP, community, and belonging; and new research on hip hop. We also share sociological accounts of Covid caretaking and the illusion-destroying power of the pandemic.

Features:

In “Refusing to Throw in the Towel,” Kyle Green and Nancy Kidder examine the story of the UFC’s decision to resume fighting and what it reveals about the social pressures sporting organizations face in returning to action.

The Editors’ Desk:

In “Ode to TSP,” graduate editor Allison Nobles shares a heartfelt reflection on her time at the helm of The Society Pages.

Discoveries:

Emcees and Communities, Black Placemaking as Artist-Shaping” by Neeraj Rajasekar. We bring you new research exploring how hip hop artists build community resilience and solidarity as they bring their artistic visions to life.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Connecting Crises of Carework in the Era of Coronavirus” by Amber Crowell and Jennifer Randles.

From Our Community Pages:

Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies discusses connections between Wilhelm II’s Germany and Trump’s USA.

A Backstage Sociologist explores how the pandemic serves to remind us of the human condition.

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday! This week, we feature new research on stereotypes and reporting, algorithms used to drive policy, and the importance of Census data for understanding race, diversity, and inequality.

Discoveries:

Traffic Accident Reporting Drives Gender Stereotypes” by Jean Marie Maier. We bring you new research investigating how gender stereotypes about bad drivers are perpetuated by the media.

Algorithmic Blues: Accuracy Versus Morality in Policy Debates” by Mahala Miller. New research explores how policymakers feel about insurance companies’ use of credit scores to predict prices–one consequential example of a predictive algorithm used to set policy.

There’s Research on That:

A #TSPClassics Collection: The Sociology of the Census” by Neeraj Rajasekar. We round up research on the history and methods of conducting the Census, and how social scientists have used Census data in research and theory-building.

From Our Partners:

Contexts

Con Corazón San Antonio” by Fabio Rojas.

Healthcare and Critical Infrastructure” by Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

COVID-19 Impact on Asia and Beyond” by Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

Council on Contemporary Families

Online learning will be hard for kids whose schools close – and the digital divide will make it even harder for some of them” by Jessica Calarco.

From Our Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday! This week, we bring you research on the sexual socialization of boys and racial inequalities among newly hired coaches in college athletics. We also feature a new teaching resource for assessing students’ critical thinking about racial narratives.

There’s Research on That:

Boys, Masculinity, and Sexual Expectations” by Allison Nobles. We round up research on how boys and young men understand the relationship between beliefs about “being a man,” peer pressure, and sex.

Discoveries:

Race and Organizational Pathways in College Coaching” by Jean Marie Maier. To shed light on racial inequalities in the NCAA, new research examines who is likely to fill vacant coaching positions in Division I basketball.

Teaching TSP:

Assessing Popular Narratives on Race: A Final Project for ‘Race and Racism in the U.S.’” by Monica Jarvi. Check out this great resource for implementing a final project focused on racial narratives in your Race and Racism course!

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Will a NFL Player Take a Knee at the Super Bowl?” by Simón E. Weffer, Rodrigo Dominguez-Martinez, and Raymond Jenkins.

Council on Contemporary Families:

National Spouses Day Was Last Week…. Feeling Any Pressure? A Fact Sheet on Prospects for Marriage in Contemporary America” by Daniel L. Carlson and Stephanie Coontz.

Sociological Images:

The “New” Gender-Neutral Doll” by Martha McCaughey.

From Our Community Pages:

TSP Classics:

Just in time for the Iowa primary debacle, we bring you The (Retrospective) Charm of an Iowa Caucus,” a TSP Classic from Cyborgology and a now-ironic homage to the past simplicity of its technology.

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday the 13th! If you’re superstitious, check out some of our content on belief in the paranormal, witchcraft, and strange rituals. In new content this week, we have social science research on racial bias and the death penalty, a new study on how sexism harms health, and reflections on the long shadow of mass violence.

Special Feature:

New Abortion Laws Contribute to Sexist Environments that Harm Everyone’s Health,” by Patricia Homan. A new study shows that “structural sexism” is making people sick.

There’s Research on That!:

Racial Bias and the Death Penalty,” by Allison Nobles. In light of the Trump administration’s announcement that they will continue federal executions, we review research demonstrating racial biases play a key role in death sentences and executions in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

A Love that Does Justice,” by Myra Brown.

Being the Boss,” by Layne Amerikaner.

American Indians and Authentic Blood,” by  Le-My Tran.

Are Sociologists Next to Be Imprisoned and Tortured? A Call to Unite and Oppose the Criminalization of Social Science,” by David Lempert.

Sociological Images:

Normal Distributions in the Wild,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

My Sisters and the Long, Terrifying Shadow of Mass Violence, by Stacy Torres.


Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got new research on gender inequality in the top 1% of U.S. earners, an examination of injustice in Honduras, and reflections on the exploitation of immigrant farm labor.

Discoveries:

The Top One Percent’s Crystal Ceiling,” by Allison J. Steinke. New research in American Sociological Review finds a clear gender imbalance within the top one percent of U.S. earners.

Clippings:

Struggling with Silence in Honduras,” by Lucas Lynch. A recent article in The Progressive by sociologist Meghan Krausch documents how corporate and elite interests can prevail over ordinary Honduran plights for security and justice.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Stemming the Exploitation of Immigrant Farm Labor,” by Andrew Smolski.

Health and Romantic Union Dissolution,” by Xu Yan.

Color-blindness Wrapped in a White Bow,” by Simone N. Durham.

Binding Neighborhoods through Co-offending Networks,” by Han N. Kleman.

Risk and Resilience on Reservations,” by Layne Amerikaner.

When a School Isn’t Just a School,” by Nadirah Farah Foley.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Amy Blackstone on Childfree Adults,” by Barbara Risman.


Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got the social science of cricket, new research on green consumption and social status, and reflections on race in the NFL.

There’s Research on That!:

Wickets and Sixes: A Social Science of Cricket,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. As teams compete for the Cricket World Cup, social science explores cricket at the intersections of globalization, postcolonialism, boundaries, and identity.

Religion, Sexuality, and Social Change,” by Evan Stewart. For Pride month, we revisit social science research on the relationship between religion and sexuality.

Discoveries:

Go Green, Gain Esteem,” by Amy August. New research in Socius finds that green consumption is a status symbol for both conservatives and liberals alike, but reducing consumption is not.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Keep off the Grassroots?” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Can Sociology Help Democracy Assistance Programs?” by Theodore P. Gerber.

Black Artists and Elite Taste Culture,” by Patricia A. Banks.

‘Til Death,” by Eric Stone.

Urban Upkeep,” by Layne Amerikaner.

Yes, Sociology is Racist, Too,” by Jessica Shotwell.

Afrofuturism and Black Panther,” by Myron T. Strong and K. Sean Chaplin.

Frack, Yes,” by Emily Campbell.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: “Daddy’s Home!” Increasing Men’s Use of Paternity Leave,” by Ankita Patnaik.

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

It’s a snowy Friday at TSP headquarters, but that won’t stop us from bringing you the latest sociological takes. This week we’ve got social science research on the social construction of gender and sex, colorblind racism in the constitution, and a new teaching exercise using voter fraud to teach students how to evaluate evidence. And don’t forget TODAY is the deadline to send in submissions for The ‘Teach with TSP’ Contest!

Teaching TSP:

Teaching How to Evaluate Evidence using Voter Fraud,” by Meghan Krausch. An exercise using TSP materials on voter fraud and the voting rights act to teach students how to evaluate evidence.

There’s Research on That!:

The Social Construction of Gender and Sex,” by Allison Nobles. In light of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ proposal to change the definition of gender to one that is solely biological, we rounded up research on the social construction of gender and sex.

Discoveries:

Colorblind Racism in the Constitution,” by Caity Curry. New research in Social Problems finds that covert, colorblind racism was present as far back as the creation of the U.S. Constitution.

Clippings:

Secrets of the Rich Highlight the Plight of the Poor,” by Isabel Arriagada. In a vivid account of her research in The GuardianBrooke Harrington explains that wealth managers not only preserve and expand the rich’s fortunes, but also cover up drug addictions, promiscuous behavior, secret love affairs, and laziness at work.

Diversity Debates in College Admissions,” by Neeraj RajasekarIn a recent article in The Washington Post, Anthony Chen and Lisa M. Stulberg discuss how the pursuit of diversity has a long history in higher education.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Gender Reveals Sparking Controversy,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Caravan, Invasion, Exodus: A Photo Essay,” by Veronica Montes.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Response to Arielle Kuperberg, ‘Cohabitation and Divorce: The Importance of Accounting for Age at Coresidence’,” by Michael J. Rosenfeld and Katharina Roesler.

Social Studies MN:

The Gender Policy Report: Discover the Gender Equity Implications of Policymaking,” by Allison J. Steinke.

Midwest Sociology:

The Tea Party is More Complicated Than You Think,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Happy Friday and welcome back! This week we’ve got a new special feature on diversity and wealth in the U.S. Congress, social science research on the migration of unaccompanied minors, and how social media can be a double-edged sword.

Special Feature:

Diversity and Wealth in Congress Today,” by Richard Zweigenhaft. In our latest feature, Zweigenhaft examines how the diversity of Congress and the wealth of its members has changed over time.

There’s Research on That!:

The Rationale and Risks of Child Migration,” by Lucas Lynch. In light of recent media attention on unaccompanied minors who migrate to the United States, we rounded up social science research on the difficult decision to migrate and the experiences of those who do.

Discoveries:

Spelling Bees to Secure Straight ‘A’s’,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that a belief in the need to competitive in the modern world drives many Asian-American parents to emphasize educational success for their children.

Clippings:

How Class Privilege Shaped Kavanaugh,” by Caity Curry. In an op-ed for The Washington PostShamus Khan provides his take on how class privilege shaped many of Brett Kavanaugh’s actions.

Social Media is a Double-Edged Sword,” by Allison J. Steinke. In an article published by MIT Technology ReviewZeynep Tufekci uses her research on political upheaval and social media to show how digital connectivity can enable large-scale movements but also has a “dark side.”

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Who Gets to Change the Subject?” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Nonviolent Protests and the Formation of Democracies,” by Hannah N. Kleman.

Council on Contemporary Families:

How Marital Transitions Affect Perceptions about Family Caregiving Responsibilities,” by Lawrence H. Ganong and Marilyn Coleman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes