Search results for friday roundup

Happy Friday! This week, we bring you research on the sexual socialization of boys and racial inequalities among newly hired coaches in college athletics. We also feature a new teaching resource for assessing students’ critical thinking about racial narratives.

There’s Research on That:

Boys, Masculinity, and Sexual Expectations” by Allison Nobles. We round up research on how boys and young men understand the relationship between beliefs about “being a man,” peer pressure, and sex.

Discoveries:

Race and Organizational Pathways in College Coaching” by Jean Marie Maier. To shed light on racial inequalities in the NCAA, new research examines who is likely to fill vacant coaching positions in Division I basketball.

Teaching TSP:

Assessing Popular Narratives on Race: A Final Project for ‘Race and Racism in the U.S.’” by Monica Jarvi. Check out this great resource for implementing a final project focused on racial narratives in your Race and Racism course!

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Will a NFL Player Take a Knee at the Super Bowl?” by Simón E. Weffer, Rodrigo Dominguez-Martinez, and Raymond Jenkins.

Council on Contemporary Families:

National Spouses Day Was Last Week…. Feeling Any Pressure? A Fact Sheet on Prospects for Marriage in Contemporary America” by Daniel L. Carlson and Stephanie Coontz.

Sociological Images:

The “New” Gender-Neutral Doll” by Martha McCaughey.

From Our Community Pages:

TSP Classics:

Just in time for the Iowa primary debacle, we bring you The (Retrospective) Charm of an Iowa Caucus,” a TSP Classic from Cyborgology and a now-ironic homage to the past simplicity of its technology.

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Happy Friday the 13th! If you’re superstitious, check out some of our content on belief in the paranormal, witchcraft, and strange rituals. In new content this week, we have social science research on racial bias and the death penalty, a new study on how sexism harms health, and reflections on the long shadow of mass violence.

Special Feature:

New Abortion Laws Contribute to Sexist Environments that Harm Everyone’s Health,” by Patricia Homan. A new study shows that “structural sexism” is making people sick.

There’s Research on That!:

Racial Bias and the Death Penalty,” by Allison Nobles. In light of the Trump administration’s announcement that they will continue federal executions, we review research demonstrating racial biases play a key role in death sentences and executions in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

A Love that Does Justice,” by Myra Brown.

Being the Boss,” by Layne Amerikaner.

American Indians and Authentic Blood,” by  Le-My Tran.

Are Sociologists Next to Be Imprisoned and Tortured? A Call to Unite and Oppose the Criminalization of Social Science,” by David Lempert.

Sociological Images:

Normal Distributions in the Wild,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

My Sisters and the Long, Terrifying Shadow of Mass Violence, by Stacy Torres.


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Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got new research on gender inequality in the top 1% of U.S. earners, an examination of injustice in Honduras, and reflections on the exploitation of immigrant farm labor.

Discoveries:

The Top One Percent’s Crystal Ceiling,” by Allison J. Steinke. New research in American Sociological Review finds a clear gender imbalance within the top one percent of U.S. earners.

Clippings:

Struggling with Silence in Honduras,” by Lucas Lynch. A recent article in The Progressive by sociologist Meghan Krausch documents how corporate and elite interests can prevail over ordinary Honduran plights for security and justice.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Stemming the Exploitation of Immigrant Farm Labor,” by Andrew Smolski.

Health and Romantic Union Dissolution,” by Xu Yan.

Color-blindness Wrapped in a White Bow,” by Simone N. Durham.

Binding Neighborhoods through Co-offending Networks,” by Han N. Kleman.

Risk and Resilience on Reservations,” by Layne Amerikaner.

When a School Isn’t Just a School,” by Nadirah Farah Foley.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Amy Blackstone on Childfree Adults,” by Barbara Risman.


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Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got the social science of cricket, new research on green consumption and social status, and reflections on race in the NFL.

There’s Research on That!:

Wickets and Sixes: A Social Science of Cricket,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. As teams compete for the Cricket World Cup, social science explores cricket at the intersections of globalization, postcolonialism, boundaries, and identity.

Religion, Sexuality, and Social Change,” by Evan Stewart. For Pride month, we revisit social science research on the relationship between religion and sexuality.

Discoveries:

Go Green, Gain Esteem,” by Amy August. New research in Socius finds that green consumption is a status symbol for both conservatives and liberals alike, but reducing consumption is not.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Keep off the Grassroots?” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Can Sociology Help Democracy Assistance Programs?” by Theodore P. Gerber.

Black Artists and Elite Taste Culture,” by Patricia A. Banks.

‘Til Death,” by Eric Stone.

Urban Upkeep,” by Layne Amerikaner.

Yes, Sociology is Racist, Too,” by Jessica Shotwell.

Afrofuturism and Black Panther,” by Myron T. Strong and K. Sean Chaplin.

Frack, Yes,” by Emily Campbell.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: “Daddy’s Home!” Increasing Men’s Use of Paternity Leave,” by Ankita Patnaik.

And from the Community Pages:

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It’s a snowy Friday at TSP headquarters, but that won’t stop us from bringing you the latest sociological takes. This week we’ve got social science research on the social construction of gender and sex, colorblind racism in the constitution, and a new teaching exercise using voter fraud to teach students how to evaluate evidence. And don’t forget TODAY is the deadline to send in submissions for The ‘Teach with TSP’ Contest!

Teaching TSP:

Teaching How to Evaluate Evidence using Voter Fraud,” by Meghan Krausch. An exercise using TSP materials on voter fraud and the voting rights act to teach students how to evaluate evidence.

There’s Research on That!:

The Social Construction of Gender and Sex,” by Allison Nobles. In light of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ proposal to change the definition of gender to one that is solely biological, we rounded up research on the social construction of gender and sex.

Discoveries:

Colorblind Racism in the Constitution,” by Caity Curry. New research in Social Problems finds that covert, colorblind racism was present as far back as the creation of the U.S. Constitution.

Clippings:

Secrets of the Rich Highlight the Plight of the Poor,” by Isabel Arriagada. In a vivid account of her research in The GuardianBrooke Harrington explains that wealth managers not only preserve and expand the rich’s fortunes, but also cover up drug addictions, promiscuous behavior, secret love affairs, and laziness at work.

Diversity Debates in College Admissions,” by Neeraj RajasekarIn a recent article in The Washington Post, Anthony Chen and Lisa M. Stulberg discuss how the pursuit of diversity has a long history in higher education.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Gender Reveals Sparking Controversy,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Caravan, Invasion, Exodus: A Photo Essay,” by Veronica Montes.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Response to Arielle Kuperberg, ‘Cohabitation and Divorce: The Importance of Accounting for Age at Coresidence’,” by Michael J. Rosenfeld and Katharina Roesler.

Social Studies MN:

The Gender Policy Report: Discover the Gender Equity Implications of Policymaking,” by Allison J. Steinke.

Midwest Sociology:

The Tea Party is More Complicated Than You Think,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday and welcome back! This week we’ve got a new special feature on diversity and wealth in the U.S. Congress, social science research on the migration of unaccompanied minors, and how social media can be a double-edged sword.

Special Feature:

Diversity and Wealth in Congress Today,” by Richard Zweigenhaft. In our latest feature, Zweigenhaft examines how the diversity of Congress and the wealth of its members has changed over time.

There’s Research on That!:

The Rationale and Risks of Child Migration,” by Lucas Lynch. In light of recent media attention on unaccompanied minors who migrate to the United States, we rounded up social science research on the difficult decision to migrate and the experiences of those who do.

Discoveries:

Spelling Bees to Secure Straight ‘A’s’,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that a belief in the need to competitive in the modern world drives many Asian-American parents to emphasize educational success for their children.

Clippings:

How Class Privilege Shaped Kavanaugh,” by Caity Curry. In an op-ed for The Washington PostShamus Khan provides his take on how class privilege shaped many of Brett Kavanaugh’s actions.

Social Media is a Double-Edged Sword,” by Allison J. Steinke. In an article published by MIT Technology ReviewZeynep Tufekci uses her research on political upheaval and social media to show how digital connectivity can enable large-scale movements but also has a “dark side.”

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Who Gets to Change the Subject?” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Nonviolent Protests and the Formation of Democracies,” by Hannah N. Kleman.

Council on Contemporary Families:

How Marital Transitions Affect Perceptions about Family Caregiving Responsibilities,” by Lawrence H. Ganong and Marilyn Coleman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! We’re glad to have you back. This week at TSP we’ve got social science research on why public breastfeeding is stigmatized, the gender of your favorite beer (and who can drink it), and why sociology needs science fiction. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

Breast is Best (But Not in Public),” by Allison Nobles and Jackie Austin. To recognize how long it took public breastfeeding to be lawful in all 50 U.S. states, we rounded up social science research on why the practice still faces stigma.

Discoveries:

Gender on Tap,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Social Currents finds that consumers consider certain beers masculine and others feminine, and women often face stigma when choosing a beer, while men rarely do.

Clippings:

Recognizing Racism and Implicit Bias,” by Lucas Lynch. In a recent article in the Washington Post, Megan R. Underhill calls for Whites to take their own implicit racial prejudices seriously and speak up against such bias.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

The Role of Replays,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Why Sociology Needs Science Fiction,” by Daniel Hirshman, Philip Schwadel, Rick Searle, Erica Deadman, and Ijlal Naqvi.

Students and University Growing Up Together,” by Irenee R. Beattie and Roger J. Wyan.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Gender Matters in Every Aspect of Our Lives – And What You Need to Know to Keep Up,” by Virginia Rutter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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There’s Research on That!:

Me Too Behind Bars,” by Amber Joy Powell. Adding to the national conversation about sexual violence spurred by the #MeToo campaign, we rounded up social science research on sexual violence in detention.

Discoveries:

Out of Prison, Into Precarity,” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in the American Journal of Sociology finds that formerly incarcerated individuals work in intermittent, short-term, and precarious jobs to make ends meet.

Clippings:

When Gun Control Gets Godly,” by Evan StewartIn a recent article for the Washington Post, Andrew Whitehead, Landon Schnabel, and Samuel Perry explain the link between beliefs about guns and religion. 

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Contexts Symposium: After Charlottesville, Part Two,” by Contexts Magazine.

Broadening the Landscape of Blackness, An Interview with Ayana v. Jackson,” by Fiona R. Greenland.

Racial Reckoning and White Empathy: Lessons from my Mother,” by Judith Taylor.

Activism and the Academy, An Interview with Cornell West,” by Janice McCabe.

Are Karl Marx’s Claims Accurate? Partially,” by Timothy M. Gill.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Trans Kids in the 21st Century: An Interview with Tey Meadow,” by Barbara Risman.

Midwest Sociology:

“Meet the Midwest:” Dances with Dr. Hui Wilcox,” by Neeraj Rajasekar.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! As we move into August, we rounded up research on abortion providers before Roe v. Wade, the ways country context influences web journalism analytics, and why so many people watch disaster coverage.

There’s Research on That!:

Abortion Providers before Roe v. Wade,” by Allison Nobles. With the threat of Roe v. Wade being overturned, we rounded up historical research on abortion providers before abortion was legal in the United States.

Discoveries:

Web Journalism, Metrics, and Country Context,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in the American Journal of Sociology finds that cultural and national idiosyncrasies impact how news organizations use digital analytics.

Clippings:

Empathy and Trauma on TV,” by Brooke ChambersVox talks with sociologist Tim Recuber about why so many people watch coverage of disasters.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Creepy Videos Show Routines Running Wild,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Asian Americans, Bamboo Ceilings, and Affirmative Action,” by Margaret M. Chin.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Babies in the Senate and City Hall: Are Today’s Mothers Making Different Demands from the Generation before Them?” by Barbara Risman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! This week at TSP we’ve got social science research on involuntary celibacy, sexism in employment, and Hollywood.

The Editors’ Desk:

Hollywood’s New Blockbusters and Sociology’s Special Agents,” by Doug Hartmann. Doug reflects on sociology and movies via a recent New Yorker article featuring sociologist Violaine Roussel’s new book, Representing Talent: Hollywood Agents and the Making of Movies.

There’s Research on That!:

Involuntary Celibacy and the Life Course,” by Allison Nobles. In light of recent talk about “incels” — involuntary celibates — we rounded up social science research on this population.

Discoveries:

When Women are Too Smart to be Hired,” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in the American Sociological Review finds that high academic achievement pays off for men in the job market, but not for women.

Clippings:

Sexism and Sickness,” by Allison NoblesSalon talks to Catherine Harnois and Joao Luiz Bastos about how workplace discrimination makes women sick.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

We are Family, Aren’t We? Interracial Coupling and Support from Extended Kin,” by Jenifer Bratter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

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