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Happy Friday everyone! We here at TSP are gearing up for the start of a new semester and are excited about welcoming some new grad board members, starting some new projects, and continuing to report on the best in sociological research. To kick off the school year, in addition to linking to our most recent posts, this week we highlight some of the blogs at TSP that are great resources for teachers and students alike.

Teaching with TSP:

If you are teaching classes this fall, or prepping a class for the near future, check out the wide variety of syllabi, activities, and videos at our Teaching TSP blog. We have great posts on how to use Discoveries to teach methods, how to use TROTs to show students how to summarize research, and how to use social science to get students to reflect on evidence used in the media.

Discoveries:

Looking for short and interesting summaries of recent research articles by sociologists? Look no further than our Discoveries blog! We cover two to four articles a month and pull from dozens of journals. Some of our recent summaries include how bilingual benefits vary by gender, how social media influences anti-fracking movements, and how intelligence does not necessarily curb racism.

Clippings:

Race and Perceived Attractiveness,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research shows how black people are seen as more attractive if they tell others they are mixed-race.

Divorce Season,” Allison Nobles. Turns out, there is not only a marriage season, but divorces also follow seasonal trends.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Welfare Reform Attitudes and Single Mothers’ Employment after 20 Years,” by Phil Cohen.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! We have some great stuff for you this week, including thoughts on Trump’s latest “joke,” how to better promote diversity on college campuses, and the success (or lack thereof) of social media campaigns. See below or stop by the site to catch up on the latest.

Discoveries:

How Black Mothers Struggle to Navigate ‘Thug’ Imagery,” by Amber Joy Powell. “Black mothers of all economic backgrounds use stigma management to try and keep their sons safe, whether it be teaching them to manage their environment, their experiences, or their emotions.”

The Consequences of Costless ‘Likes’,” by Jacqui Frost. New research finds that “liking” a cause on social media is not likely to lead to a donation.

There’s Research on That!:

The Wax and Wane of Body Hair Removal,” by Allison Nobles. To shave or not to shave? Research shows that trends in body hair removal may be shifting, but certain choices continue to be stigmatized.

Clippings:

The Feminization of Bank Robberies,” by Kat Albrecht. Sociologists reflect on the causes of a recent uptick in the number of females committing bank robberies.

Combating CyberCreeps,” by Allison Nobles. Women are starting to speak out about their experiences of harassment on online dating sites and coming up with strategies to curb harassment in the future.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

How the Ways College Authorities Talk about Diversity Can Undercut Efforts To Fight Racial Inequality,” by Natasha Warikoo.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Date’s Not Dead,” by Arielle Kuperberg and Joseph E. Padgett.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday everyone! We here at TSP HQ are wrapping up another great semester with research on binge drinking, collective mourning, and ex-felon employment. While we will remain hard at work bringing you all the best in sociological research over the summer, we are going to scale back our Roundups to once a month until September. So, you won’t hear from us again until June but be sure to keep stopping by to check out what we are up to in the interim!

There’s Research on That!:

When Fans Cry: Why We Mourn the Loss of Celebrities” by Amber Joy Powell. “People mourn the death of celebrities who hold connections to emotional events; that is, people do not solely grieve the loss of that celebrity, but also the loss of the memories associated with that celebrity.”

Discoveries:

Binge Drinking on the Bubble,” by Ryan Larson. Peer pressure can create a potent pull to binge drink, but only for those with a medium genetic propensity.

Clippings:

Ex-felon Employment,” by Ryan Larson. NPR talks to Devah Pager about how felons fare when they gain employment.

Give Methods a Chance:

Madison Van Oort on Discourse Analysis & Studying Commercials,” with Kyle Green. Kyle and Madison chat about their collaborative work on the ways commercials employ the crisis of masculinity to sell products.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Converging Gender Wage Gap, 1980-2012,” by Craig Upright.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Why is Pay for Caregiving Work So Low?” by Paula England.

Scholars Strategy Network:

What We Know – And Need to Learn – About Progress Against Sex Discrimination in Education,” by Celene Reynolds.

And a Few From the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! We’ve got a little bit of everything for you this week, from gender segregation in the workplace, to white evangelical Christians and their voting habits, to data activism and the Panama Papers. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

Colorism and Divisions Among Black Women,” by Amber Joy Powell. How casting for the new Nina Simone biopic highlights the consequences of colorism.

Discoveries:

Trickle-Down Gender Parity?” by Allison Nobles. When women are employed in upper level positions, what happens to the women left near the bottom?

Clippings:

A-Ok-Cupid,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Sociologist Michael Rosenfeld dispels negative assumptions about online dating.

From our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Why America’s White Evangelical Christians Turn Out at High Rates in Midterm Elections,” by Lydia Bean.

Council on Contemporary Families:

How is Celebrity Intimate Partner Violence Covered? Race and Gender Patterns Abound,” by Molly McNulty.

Contexts:

Talking Happiness, Security, and Counterinsurgency with Laleh Khalili,” by Steven Thrasher.

The Paper Ceiling,” by Brittany Dernberger.

How to End Institutional Racism,” by the Contexts Grad Team.

The Unborn and the Undead.” Viewpoints by Susan Markens, Katrina Kimport, Drew Halfmann, Kimala Price, and Deana A. Rohlinger.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy February and happy Friday, everyone!  From family leave policy to the facts behind the latest Netflix drama, we have a feast of new sociology to kick off your weekend.

The Editors’ Desk:

Sociologists Writing and Being Read.” Doug Hartmann looks at public sociology in The New Yorker and The Atlantic this week.

There’s Research on That!

Un-Making a Murderer Still Leaves a Mark.” While we all start armchair law school with Netflix’s Making a Murderer, Ryan Larson looks at the social science of exoneration.

Discoveries:

Bilingual Benefits Vary by Gender” by Allison Nobles. New research from Jennifer C. Lee and Sarah J. Hatteberg shows how the stigma of speaking Spanish affects Latino men and Latina women differently.

Clippings:

Policies to Support Working Parents” by Amber Powell. Michael Kimmel writes in Fast Company about how corporations can live out their “family first” ideals.

Give Methods a Chance:

C.J. Pascoe on Ethnographic Research. This week’s podcast discusses the joys of being an ethnographer, the difficulties of accessing youth culture, and how entering a school allowed a more nuanced understanding of contemporary masculinity.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Downside of Urban Growth By Undemocratic Means.” Michael Peter Smith shows how cities turn to private boards to fix their infrastructure, and how this can undermine voters’ voices.

Contexts:

A Gap Between Soc Classrooms and the Field.Andrew Lindner looks at a gap in teaching and research citations that shows we may not always practice what we preach.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! Before you leap into February, stop by TSP and check out our awesome new pieces on everything from participatory budgeting to Sarah Palin’s sweater.

The Editors’ Desk:

Finding Firmer Ground,” by Chris Uggen. “While many of us are struggling mightily to nurture and defend something important, I am increasingly convinced that we’re not mounting our defense from very firm ground. As a professor and administrator, I’d like to see a stronger collective commitment among the faculty on a few no-brainers.”

Discoveries:

Shades of Health,” by Amber Joy PowellEllis Monk investigates the ways skin tone influences health disparities via discrimination.

Clippings:

Scientific (and Corporate) Deviance Add Up at VW,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. How “accumulated fudging” normalizes deviance.

GOP Candidates Trump Up Immigration Threat,” by Allison NoblesDavid Cook Martin talks to The Conversation about why the GOP candidates continue to conflate immigration with crime.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

How Participatory Budgeting Strengthens Communities and Improves Local Governance,” by Isaac Jabola-Carolus.

Contexts:

Father Schools and Promise Keepers,” by Nicole Bedera.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello! It’s TSP. We were wondering if after all these days you’d like to see  our latest coverage of work in sociology!

Discoveries:

(Re)Locating Recidivism” by Ryan Larson. New research from David S. Kirk shows how natural disasters can also make natural experiments in neighborhood composition.

Office Hours:

Andrew Perrin on American Political Publics.Jack Delehanty talks with Andrew Perrin about his new book, American Democracy: From Tocqueville to Town Halls to Twitter.

Clippings:

The Corporate Interests Behind The Persistence of Climate Change Denial” by Eamon Whalen. Justin Farrell talks to The Washington Post.

Innuendo in the ER: Okay, Unless You’re Black” by Caty TabordaAdia Harvey Wingfield talks to The Atlantic about race, sexuality, and workplace culture.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Roots and Impact of Outrage-Mongering in U.S. Political Opinion Media.” Sarah Sobieraj and Jeffrey M. Berry discuss their research on when and why political media gets mad.

Contexts:

Contexts rolls out the Fall 2015 Table of Contents, free to read for the first month!

Context is Everything.” Joshua Page talks to New York Times food critic Pete Wells

And a Few From the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! Be sure to stop by TSP and check out what we’ve been up to this week.

There’s Research on That!:

Prescription Drug Use on the Rise,” by Caty Taborda. How pharmaceutical companies convince us we need pills for problems we didn’t even know we had.

Discoveries:

Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric Raises Gun Sales,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. “In short, anti-immigration legislation and rhetoric can shape public attitudes, and social anxiety can predict the likelihood that locals ‘lock and load.'”

Clippings:

The Sociology of North Carolina Barbecue,” by Eamon Whalen.  John Shelton Reed talks to The New Yorker and explains how “barbecue is to the American south what wine and cheese are to Europe.”

Racial Profiling? There’s an App for That,” by Eamon Whalen. Leslie Hinkson talks to The Washington Post about the potential consequences of crime monitoring apps.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Why America’s Women of Color Have Lost Ground Since the Great Recession,” by Marion Johnson. Limited access to health insurance, minimal representation in the government, and discriminatory voter ID laws all contribute to this troubling trend.

Contexts:

College Men Having Sex With Men: Are They Exclusively Tops or Bottoms? (No),” by Eliza Brown and Paula England. Research shows that most men are “versatile” rather than always one or the other.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! We’ve got lots of great new stuff on the site this week, so be sure to stop by and check it out!

There’s Research on That!:

In “The Politics of Pink,” Sarah Catherine Billups reviews research that complicates the “pink culture” surrounding breast cancer awareness campaigns.

Discoveries:

‘Traditional Women’ and Modern Migration” by Allison NoblesAnju Mary Paul finds that, despite what looks to be a break from traditional gender norms, migrant women often frame their movement as a means to fulfill their roles as mothers and wives.

Office Hours:

Joanna Kempner talks to Matt Gunther about the “Gender Politics of Migraine.”

Clippings:

Discrimination Harms Transgender Health,” by Allison NoblesLisa R. Miller and Eric Anthony Grollman talk to US News about the disproportionate discrimination trans people experience and how that relates to poor health outcomes.

Can Being Buried Alive Be a Good Thing?” by Neeraj RajasekarMargee Kerr talks to ABC News about the benefits of overcoming our fears.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Are Gender Stereotypes A Problem For Female Candidates?” by Nichole Bauer.

Contexts:

Pete Wells: Nytimes Food Critic, Accidental Sociologist,” by Josh Page.

What 5 Disciplines (Not Sociology) Say About Ex-offender Re-entry,” by Brittany Dernberger

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Since last we met… Our new book arrived! Check out Getting Culture (just $15!), then read on for the rest of this week’s fresh sociology.

The Editors’ Desk:

Back to School Research,” by Doug Hartmann and Chris Uggen. Some of the fresh sociology research on education and learning as featured on TSP, its partner sites, and its Community Page blogs.

Discoveries:

Policy Changes that Help Reduce Murder Rates,” by Ryan Larson. Patricia L. McCall and Jonathan R. Brauer‘s new research shows that welfare might not stop homicide, but increased social support certainly wouldn’t hurt.

Clippings:

More than 9 to 5,” by Caty Taborda. Randolph Cantrell on trends in juggling multiple jobs.

Are Behavioral Issues Black and White?” by Caty Taborda. David Ramey on finding that race affects how schoolkids are punished.

Cougars: Literal Mountain Lions,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Milaine Alarie and Jason Carmichael on the myth of the wealthy older woman making prey out of 20-somethings.

Scholars Strategy Network:

U.S. Latinos Care About Many Issues Beyond Immigration,” by Stella M. Rouse. When it comes to voter priorities, for Latinos, immigration only makes the top three.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Overwork May Explain 10% of Men’s Wage Advantage Over Women,” by Youngjoo Cha. Some of the wage gap owes to men’s taking on extra hours.

The Community Pages:

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