Hey everyone! This week we’ve got timely takes on the death penalty, disgruntled air travelers, and the shortcomings of the U.S. tax system. We’ve also got a new podcast episode on the Koch Brothers and American democracy. So settle in and see below for some serious sociology!

Office Hours:

Theda Skocpol on the Koch Network with Jack Delehanty. In our latest podcast episode, we talk with Professor Skocpol about how the Koch Brothers have transformed American democracy, and whether any corollaries are emerging on the political left.

There’s Research on That!:

Border Walls and Symbolic Boundaries,” by Edgar Campos. Trump’s wall would be more than just a physical barrier, it would also intensify the symbolic boundaries that reinforce national and racial identities in the United States.

Racial and Regional Differences in Support for the Death Penalty,” by Caity Curry. Issues in Arkansas and the Supreme Court have brought the death penalty back into the media spotlight, so we rounded up research on this “peculiar institution” and why it remains resilient today.

Discoveries:

Who’s ‘One of the Guys?’ Navigating Gender in the Tech Industry,” by Edgar Campos. New research in Gender & Society finds that gender-fluid women are more likely to be perceived as competent tech workers.

Clippings:

Double-Booked and Discontented Airline Passengers,” by Edgar Campos. The New York Times talked with Elizabeth Popp Berman about why there is so much hostility on airplanes.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Immigration Data Tools,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Chump Change.” Viewpoints on taxes, their shortfalls, and who pays the price.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Use and Abuse of Millennials as an Analytic Category,” by Frank Furstenberg.

Some Men Try to Compensate for Relative Loss of Income to Women. How They Do So Varies,” by Dan Cassino.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Spring is in the air and sociology is on our minds. This week we cover gender roles during WWII, racial differences in support for the Affordable Care Act, and the immigration-crime paradox. All that and more below.

There’s Research on That!:

The Immigration-Crime Paradox,” by Ryan Larson. Research shows that even though immigrants and the areas they inhabit are associated with lower levels of crime, both documented and undocumented individuals are more likely to be incarcerated and receive longer prison sentences.

Moonlight, Masculinity, and Black Male Sexualities,” by Amber Joy Powell. Social science sheds light on the origins of stereotypes about Black male sexuality and how they influence Black men’s gender and sexual identity performances.

Discoveries:

Women, WWII, and Reflections on Shifting Gender Roles,” by j. Siguru Wahutu. New research in Sociological Forum reads diary entries written by women during the Blockade of Leningrad to understand their perceptions of shifting gender roles.

Clippings:

Race and Support for the Affordable Care Act,” by Neeraj RajasekarJudy Lubin tells CNN why white support for Obamacare might have saved it.

Why Fathers Are Afraid to Take Advantage of Paternity Leave Policies,” by Chelsea Carlson. The Guardian looks to Tina Miller to understand how gender norms shape parental leave.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Observing Life and Death in America: Gary Younge,” with Steven W. Thrasher.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! This week we have a number of pieces on gender inequality at work, at home, and even on vacation, a few new pieces on private prisons and policing, and sociological takes on March Madness, fake news, and shifting sexual practices. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

For Profit Prisons and the Immigrant Industrial Complex,” by Caity Curry. Private prisons have been reinstated, so we rounded up research on how they enable mass incarceration of immigrant populations.

The Social Science of Sexual Practices,” by Allison Nobles. A recent survey reported that Americans are having less sex. But, so what? Why should we care how often people are having sex or who their sexual partners are? You got it — there’s research on that!

Gendering Vacation,” by Sarah Catherine Billups and Allison Nobles. It may be spring break time for many, but women pay a higher price for taking time off work.

Discoveries:

Highly Skilled White Women Pay the Biggest Motherhood Penalty,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in American Sociological Review finds privilege has its price in the form of high motherhood penalties.

Clippings:

The “Ferguson Effect” and Informed Policing,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. The New York Times talks to David C. Pyrooz about a different kind of Ferguson effect.

Why Fewer Millennials Support Gender Equality in the Home,” Edgar CamposTime covers Joanna Pepin and colleagues’ research on the changing gender attitudes of millennials.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Scorn Wars: Rural White People and Us,” by Nina Eliasoph.

The Sadness of the Border Wall,” by David Bacon.

How the Media Makes Protests Matter,” by Polina Zvavitch.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Trending Towards Traditionalism? Changes in Youths’ Gender Ideology,” by Joanna R. Pepin and David A. Cotter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hi, Folks! While many of our team members are out at the Midwest Sociological Society meetings this weekend, we’re still here bringing you the best of the week!

There’s Research on That!:

The ‘Resurgence’ of Anti-Semitism,” by Brooke Chambers. Research shows prejudicial views aren’t a thing of the past, and may have been hiding in plain sight.

The Risks of Raiding Sanctuary Churches,” by Matt GuntherJacqui Frost, and Ethan Johnson. Sanctuary churches have a long history, and research finds immigration raids pose a risk to community stability.

Discoveries:

Class Status Helps Men More than Women in Elite Jobs,” by Ryan Larson. New research in American Sociological Review finds a high class resume could hurt women, as employers perceive them as less committed to full-time, demanding careers.

Clippings:

The Persistence of Racial Wealth Gaps,” by Neeraj RajasekarTom Shapiro talks to The Atlantic about how economic mobility is harder for families of color.

The Prison Boom in Rural America,” by Caity Curry. In The Conversation, John M. Eason shows how rural communities with larger populations of color get an economic boost from prisons, but will probably need a new line of work.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

“‘Straight Girls Kissing,’ Beyond the Elite College Campus,” by Jamie Budnick.

SocArXiv Promotes Open Sociology,” by Philip N. Cohen

Screening Therapy Clients by Race and Class,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: Are African Americans Living the Dream 50 Years After Passage of the Civil Rights Act?,” by Velma McBride Murry and Na Liu.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday all. This week we’ve got a number of new pieces on religion, some reflections on how to influence public policy, and even a little sociology in outer space!

Office Hours:

Mimi Schippers on Polyamory and Polyqueer Sexualities,” with Allison Nobles. In this episode, we chat with Schippers about her new book and the ways “compulsory monogamy” limits how we experience relationships.

There’s Research on That!:

Do Politicians Listen When Constituents Call?,” by Erik Kojola. We round up research on the pros and cons of contacting legislators as a way to change social policy.

Outer Space and Earthly Inequalities,” by Jacqui Frost. It may require rocket science to get to space, but social science is beginning to weigh in on what it might mean for social life if we continue to commodify and colonize outer space.

Discoveries:

The Ordinary Side of Charismatic Leadership,” by Jacqui Frost. New research in Sociology of Religion finds that leaders of megachurches often embody a particular kind of charisma that blends the ordinary and the extraordinary.

Clippings:

How Sociology Can Contribute to Public Policy,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. The New York Times talks to a number of sociologists in this piece about the uneven distribution of economics and sociology in public policy discussions.

Sex Breaks and Employee Satisfaction in Sweden,” by Edgar CamposLotta Dellve talks to the New York Times about the potential of sex breaks to increase employee productivity and satisfaction.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Institutionalizing Prison Reentry,” by Brittany Dernberger.

Not Making Mom Proud,” by Nicole Bedera.

The Complex Path to Secular Identity,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Black Names Aren’t That Simple,” by Moriah Willow.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Opioids, Health Care Denial, and a World of Pain,” by Megan Peterson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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We may be on spring break, but we’ve still got a great line up for you this week. See below for new pieces on voter suppression, March Madness, and cultural appropriation at rugby matches.

There’s Research on That!:

How Voter Suppression Shapes Election Outcomes,” by Neeraj Rajasekar and Amber Joy Powell. Trump may believe that massive voter fraud swayed the 2016 election, but research shows that voter suppression is a much bigger problem than fraudulent voting.

Global Human Rights and the United Nations,” by Brooke Chambers. Despite its numerous shortcomings, research shows that the UN plays a crucial role in promoting human rights across the globe.

Discoveries:

Parents in Prison Hurts Children in the Classroom,” by Caity Curry. New research in Social Forces moves beyond boys’ bad behavior to investigate the negative cognitive impacts of parental incarceration on all children.

Clippings:

Appropriating African American Spirituals for Sporting Events,” by Edgar Campos. The New York Times talked to John M. Williams and other social scientists about the causes and consequences of the English Rugby team’s use of “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” at their events.

More Stress, Less Sex?,” by Neeraj RajasekarPepper Swartz offers the Washington Post some sociological reasons for why Americans are having less sex.

 From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

TANF Policy to Address Low, Volatile Income among Disadvantaged Families,” by Bradley Hardy.

Contexts:

Shame, Shame, Shame,” by Polina Zvavitch.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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We are heading into spring break up here in Minnesota, but TSP won’t be taking a break from bringing you all things sociology. This week we’ve got new pieces on crime fears, hate groups, and feminist book stores, among others. See below and see you next week!

There’s Research on That!:

Fear of Crime and Punitive Policies,” by Caity Curry and Ryan Larson. Despite crime rates dropping, fear of crime remains high. Social science helps explain why.

Not So “Über” Anymore?,” by Evan Stewart. Uber may be in the hot seat right now, but research shows that racial and gender discrimination is a common issue in new businesses.

How Discrimination Harms Your Health,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. The link between discrimination and stress is clear, and research shows that centrality and visibility of racial or sexual differences leads to higher rates of discrimination.

Discoveries:

Policing Mothers with Disabilities,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society finds that mothers with disabilities are often disciplined by medical professionals because of their perceived risk.

Clippings:

How Hate Groups Mobilize Masculinity,” by Neeraj RajasekarThe Guardian interviewed Michael Kimmel about the ways hate groups validate the masculinity of their followers.

The Trump Presidency and the Rise of Political Activism,” by Caity CurryDana Fisher and Sara Sobieraj talk to NPR about the recent rise in political activism on both the left and the right.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

International Family Research for International Women’s Day,” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Transnational migrants, public housing, and the Oscars. We’ve got sociological takes on all that and more this week at TSP.

Office Hours:

Sergio Chávez on Border Lives and Transnationalism,” with Matt Gunther. In this episode, Dr. Chávez describes the incredible strain that border controls and bureaucracies place on low wage workers, but he also provides a remarkable account of the way that many workers leverage these difficulties into relationships and livelihood strategies.

There’s Research on That!:

The Problems with Public Housing,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. With ongoing efforts to revitalize public housing projects in the U.S., we look to research on the social forces and sentiments driving their decline.

The Limited Efficacy of Domestic Violence Policies,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Research shows that domestic violence policies are often limited in how much they change the way perpetrators think of domestic violence, even if they sometimes keep abusers from repeating violent behavior.

Public Stories and Social Change,” by Allison Nobles. Stories can be powerful tools for establishing group identity and mobilizing people for a cause, but people in power are more likely to have their stories heard.

Discoveries:

High School Arrests Halt Higher Education,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Criminology finds that being arrested in high school severely limits pathways to higher education.

Clippings:

Trump’s Reason for Travel Ban Not Supported by Research,” by Edgar CamposCharles Kurzman tells the LA Times that his research has not identified a single death since the 9/11 attacks caused by people from the seven nations Trump put on his ban list.

The Ivy League of Gender Inequality,” by Brooke ChambersNew York Magazine details a new study by Dirk Witteveen and Paul Attewell that finds a gender pay gap among graduates of elite universities.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Raising the Visibility of Gender-Nonconformists: A Review of ‘Gender Revolution: A Journey with Kati Couric’,” by Barbara J. Risman.

Moonlight, Trayvon, the Oscars, and America’s Fear of Black Boys,” by Steven Thrasher.

Children of Immigrants, Changing Races,” by Saswathi Natta.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Time/Place/Race/Class and Family Changes,” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello hello all! As usual, we have a great line up for you this week, so we will get right to it.

There’s Research on That!:

When Journalists Tweet,” by j. Siguru Wahutu. Social media in the newsroom is increasingly common, but it can blur the lines between professional and personal opinion.

The Role of Female Role Models,” by Jacqui Frost. Social science shows that positive female role models are a significant predictor of interest and success in STEM for women, and movie stars are not the only ones who can fill those roles.

Discoveries:

Police Brutality and Citizen Cynicism,” by Ryan Larson. New research in American Sociological Review finds a significant drop in 911 calls after an incident of police violence.

Clippings:

How Scary Video Games Build Social Bonds,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau.  Margee Kerr talks to The Observer about the camaraderie you can build by playing horror-themed video games with others.

‘Colorblind’ Economic Policies and Their Racial Repercussions,” by Caity CurryAdia Harvey Wingfield explains how seemingly neutral economic and criminal justice policies can work to maintain systems of racial inequality in The Atlantic.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

For African Americans, Grief and Loss Starting as Children,” with Debra Umberson.

Contexts:

Babes in Bikeland,” by Bjorn Christianson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! This week we’ve got timely pieces on private schooling, immigration policy, fearmongering, and more. So read on if you’re looking for a little sociological perspective.

There’s Research on That!:

School Choice and Social Inequality,” by Evan Stewart and Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science comparing private and public approaches to schooling finds distinct benefits of public schools and questions whether more choice in schooling really helps everyone.

The Culture of Mass Deportation,” by Caity Curry. On the history of American immigration policy and the increasingly punitive turn it’s taken.

Discoveries:

Uncertainty and Flexibility in Trans Health Care,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in Journal of Health and Social Behavior investigates how doctors navigate trans care.

Clippings:

Nothing to Fear but Fearmongering Itself,” by Edgar CamposBarry Glassner talks to TIME about Trump’s unprecedented use of fearmongering as a political tactic.

Why We Don’t Need a White History Month,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Vox talks to Daniel Hirschman about how calls for a white history month ignore the already pervasive white privilege in U.S. society.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

“How Many Deaths? The High Rate of Bereavement among Black Americans,” by Megan Peterson.

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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