Hello! This week we’ve got social science research on queer criminal activity, gender lines at the Olympics, and choosing a child-free life.

There’s Research on That!:

‘Queering’ Criminality and Victimization,” by Caity Curry. We review recent research on queer criminal activity to move beyond one-sided depictions of LGBT people as solely victims of hate crimes.

Clippings:

Affirming Gender Lines in the Olympics,” by Allison Nobles. The New York Times talks with Madeleine Pape about the recent ruling that female track athletes with naturally elevated levels of testosterone must reduce these hormones before they can participate in certain races at major competitions.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Economics of Migration,” by  Jonathan Portes.

Council on Contemporary Families:

More People Than Ever Aren’t Having Babies. And They’re Doing Just Fine,” by Amy Blackstone.

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Thanks for joining us this week! We’ve got a special feature on fertility trends, new research on elementary school expulsions, and young people’s extramarital affairs.

Special Feature:

US Fertility Keeps Dropping – But That’s Not a Reason to Panic,” by Caroline Sten Hartnett. In this special feature, we take a look at fertility trends in the United States.

Discoveries:

Elementary Expulsions,” by Mark Lee. New research in Social Forces finds that youth of color are much more likely to be suspended or expelled from school by age nine.

Clippings:

Millennials, Marriage, and Monogamy,” by Allison Nobles. The Atlantic talks with Wendy Manning and Andrew Cherlin about young couples and extramarital affairs.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Flat Rebels,” by Julie Whitaker.

Letter from the Editors, Spring 2019,” by Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

Sociological Images:

Supreme Sociology: How Hype Happens,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: Trevor Hoppe on Punishing Disease,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Welcome back! This week at TSP we’ve got social science research on climate change and racial inequality, and how aggressive policing harms African American boys’ educational performance. We’ve also got a new teaching post on ice breaker activities that transition easily into course material.

Teaching TSP:

Ice Breakers and Community Building in the Classroom,” by Andrea Krieg. In this post, Krieg gives three examples of ice breakers that can be used to build community in the classroom and seamlessly move into course content.

There’s Research on That!:

The Color of Climate Change,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. We rounded up social science research on how climate change poses greater challenges for poorer, non-white communities in the United States and globally.

Discoveries:

How Aggressive Policing Hurts School Performance,” by Caity Curry. New research in the American Sociological Review finds that aggressive policing policies hurt African American boys’ school performance.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Big Data and the American Dream, An Interview with David Grusky,” by Reeve Vanneman.

Sociological Images:

What Kind of ____ are You?” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Sharenting Can be Controversial, But Are We Sure Parents Don’t Care about Their Children’s Social Media Presence?” by Davide Cino and Ellen Wartella.

Social Studies MN:

The Minnesota Population Center,” by Neeraj Rajasekar.

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Hello friends! This week we’ve got a new teaching activity on names of places, social science research on parental incarceration, and sociological takes on why screen-time guidelines may not reflect the realities of all families.

Teaching TSP:

Using Rock Climbing to Teach about Sexism, Racism, and Colonialism,” by Meghan Krausch. In this interactive activity, students read a recent post by Engaging Sports and research place names in their communities.

There’s Research on That!:

The Impact of Parental Incarceration on Children and Families,” by Isabel Arriagada and Caity Curry. By 2012, nearly 2.6 million children had a parent in prison or jail. We rounded up social science research on the effects of parental incarceration on children and families.

Clippings:

Screen Time in Summer Time,” by Amy August. The Atlantic talks with Jessica Calarco about how screen time guidelines make assumptions that may not be true for all families

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Welcome back! This week we’ve got social science research on Elizabeth Warren’s student debt plan, how Black motherhood is political, and why Black girls get left out of “police talk.”

There’s Research on That!:

The Sociologists Behind Warren’s Education and Debt Plans,” by Jean Marie Maier. Meet the sociologists who influenced Elizabeth Warren’s ambitious plan for free college and student loan relief.

Discoveries:

Do Black Girls Matter in Police Talk?” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Gender & Society finds that Black girls are left out of public discourse regarding police violence and the everyday “police talk” Black mothers use to teach their children how to navigate interactions with law enforcement.

Clippings:

Black Motherhood as Political Struggle,” by Amber Joy Powell. The Nation draws on research from Patricia Hill Collins and other social scientists to demonstrate how Black motherhood is a political struggle.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: CCF Mother’s Day Symposium on Housework, Gender and Parenthood,” by Stephanie Coontz.

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Hello sociology friends! This week we’ve got social science research on the relationship between housing and health, the gender gap in teaching evaluations, and how the private bail industry profits from women of color.

There’s Research on That!:

Housing Security and Health,” by Allison Nobles. One important and under-appreciated aspect of housing insecurity involves health, and sociologists have shown that the relationships between health and housing are more complicated than you might imagine. 

Discoveries:

Perfection, but not Brilliance in Teaching Evaluations,” by Jean Marie Maier. New research in American Sociological Review finds that the number of points in a rating scale might reduce the size of gender gaps.

Clippings:

Politics, Protests and Activist Memes,” by Allison J. Steinke. VICE talks with James M. Jasper about activist memes.

How Private Bail Profits from Women of Color,” by Caity Curry. The Appeal talks with Josh Page about how the private bail industry excessively profits from low-income women and women of color.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Disrupting the Racial Wealth Gap,” by Melvin L. Oliver and Thomas M. Shapiro.

Sociological Images:

The Stakes of Steak,” by Allison Nobles.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Even Gender Inequality is Unequal,” by Virginia Rutter.

Social Studies MN:

The Ins and Outs of the IMF,” by Neeraj Rajasekar.

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Welcome back! This week we’ve got a special feature on African American reparations, and social science research on sex trafficking discourse and reentry in Rwanda. Take a look at Contexts‘ symposium on college admissions, inequality, and higher education.

Special Feature:

The Case for African American Reparations, Explained,” by Joe R. Feagin. Feagin explains why the case for reparations may be gaining traction in the United States.

There’s Research on That!:

Sex Trafficking Discourse and Policy,” by Allison J. Steinke. Social science research explores sex trafficking and sex work, two terms that are often conflated.

Clippings:

Reentry and Reconciliation in Rwanda,” by Brooke Chambers. Hollie Nyseth Brehmand Laura C. Frizzell explain the reentry process for Rwandans convicted of genocidal crimes for The New York Times.

Why American Mothers are the Most Stressed,” by Javiera Lamoza Osorio. CNBC talks with Caitlyn Collins about why American moms are stressed and how policy change might be able to help.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Varsity Blues and Lawsuits, Too,” by W. Carson Byrd.

Sociological Images:

The Social Side of Sales,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Gender Structures Every Aspect of Life,” by Barbara Risman.

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Hello! This week we’ve got social science research on the expanding field of journalism, indigenous identities, and the future of public education.

There’s Research on That!:

Drones, Journalists and Hackathons,” by Allison J. Steinke.  As the field of journalism expands beyond reporters and editors to other content creators like WikiLeaks, we rounded up research on these newcomers and the future of journalism.

Discoveries:

Indicating Indigenous Identity,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in Sociology of Race and Ethnicity discusses how Indigenous People in the United States use different strategies to “prove” their group heritage.

Clippings:

Officiant-Friends and Wedding Norms,” by Allison Nobles. The Atlantic talks with sociologist Ellen Lamont about why more couples are choosing to have their friends marry them.

The Necessity of Public Schools,” by Jean Marie Maier. Vox talks about the future of public education with Adia Harvey Wingfield.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

In Public office, Out of the Public Eye,” by Emily Campbell.

Sociological Images:

Contemptible Collectibles,” by Jacqueline Clark.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Gender, Tech Jobs, and Hidden Biases that Make a Difference,” by Koji Chavez.

Social Studies MN:

The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies,” by Brooke Chambers.

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Hello everyone! This week we’ve got social science research on taxes, black women and health disparities, and the relationship between meat and masculinity. You can also find sociological takes on the complexity of toxic masculinity and the increasing rate of bisexual identification.

There’s Research on That!:

No Taxation Without Sociological Imagination,” by Mark Lee. For tax day, we rounded up research on who pays how much to Uncle Sam.

Black Women and Health Disparities,” by Amy August and De Andre’ T. Beadle. Black women face serious health disparities in the United States, so we rounded up research on medicine and wellness at the intersections of race and gender.

Discoveries:

Masculinity, Medium Rare,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Socius finds that men who experience a threat to their masculinity are more likely to express attachment to meat.

Clippings:

The Social Complexity of Toxic Masculinity,” by Allison Nobles. In a recent article in The Atlantic Michael Salter talks with Raewyn Connell about why toxic masculinity isn’t itself to blame for gender violence and inequality.

How the Politics of Racial Resentment Hurts Everyone,” by Lucas Lynch. Vox talks with Jonathan Metzl about while working-class white Americans favor policies that defund programs that could benefit their own health and opportunities.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

The Bisexual Boom,” by D’Lane Compton and Tristan Bridges.

The Wildness of Crowds,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Combating Gender Bias in Modern Workplaces,” by Alison Wynn and Shelley Correll.

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes

Hello sociology-fans! This week we’ve got sociological research on peace and conflict in Northern Ireland, morality and monetary exchanges, and why legal doctrines are not enough to stop genocide.

There’s Research on That!:

Peace and Conflict in Northern Ireland,” by Mark Lee. Sociologists explain why peace is so fragile in Northern Ireland by uncovering the structural, religious, and political roots of the conflict.

Discoveries:

Naming, Blaming, and Claiming Legal Protection from Genocide,” by Brooke Chambers. New research in Genocide Studies and Prevention finds that the existence of legal protections does little to stop genocide without states and international organizations upholding their commitments.

What Gifts Can Buy,” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in American Sociological Review finds that the line between acceptable and unacceptable monetary exchanges is blurry.

Clippings:

Discrimination During Legal Border Crossings,” by Javiera Lamoza Osorio. The Chicago Tribune features research by  Alexander UpdegroveJoshua Shadwick, Eryn O’Neal, and Alex Piquero about discrimination during legal border crossings.

Race & Basketball,” by Amy August. USC Anneberg Media talks with Ben Carrington about racial representation in sports.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Sam Smith & The Sociology of Body Shaming,” by Jonathan Harrison.

Contexts:

Rwanda, Genocide, and Gender-Based Violence,” by Nicole Fox.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Liberation Based Healing Practices: An Interview with Rhea V. Almeida,” by Joshua Coleman.

And from the Community Pages:

Last Week’s Roundup

Sign Up for Inbox Delivery of the Roundup

TSP Edited Volumes