Welcome back! This week on TSP you can find social science research on xenophobia’s connection to whites’ attitudes about punishment, why people often overlook lies told by political figures, and a post about the sociology of horror films.

There’s Research on That!:

Defining “Genocide” and The Power of Labels,” by Brooke Chambers. In light of recent debates about whether or not to call the Burmese state’s violence against the Rohingya “genocide,” we rounded up social science research on the meaning, use, and consequences of labels like genocide.

Discoveries:

Xenophobia and Punitive Attitudes,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that xenophobia may be a strong predictor of whether whites support punitiveness in the criminal justice system.

Avoidance and Activism in Response to Policing,” by Ryan Larson. New research in Socius finds that some individuals avoid formal institutions like hospitals after an arrest while others take up activism.

Clippings:

When Lies are Truth,” by Jean Marie MaierVox uses research from from Oliver HahlMinjae Kim, and Ezra Zuckerman-Sivan to explain why Kavanaugh supporters appeared unfazed by potentially false claims he made during his testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Afros and the Branding of Racial Justice,” by Lucas LynchA recent article in The Atlantic by Saida Grundy documents how modern uses of the Afro can both further social resistance and reduce the hairstyle to a mere commodity.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Horror Films Are Our Collective Nightmares,” by Marshall Smith and Laura Patterson.

Contexts:

Parenting Without Papers,”by Chandra Reyna.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Cohabitation and Divorce: The Importance of Accounting for Age at Coresidence,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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We’ve had a superb week here at TSP and that means more sociology content for you! This week we’ve got social science research on settler colonialism and Indigenous resistance, digital health-tracking technology, and the role of LGBT-specific international organizations in policymaking.

There’s Research on That!:

The Rise of Health-Tracking Technology,” by Allison Nobles. Social science research demonstrates that health-tracking technology reflects larger social forces and institutions.

Settler Colonialism and Minnesota’s “Wall of Forgotten Natives”,” by Brieanna Watters and Caity Curry. In light of the recent homeless encampment in Minneapolis, made up of primarily American Indians, we rounded up social science research on settler colonialism and resistance to it.

The Long History of “Día de la Raza” in Mexico,” by Lucas Lynch. Día de la Raza — “Day of the Race”– is celebrated today to commemorate Mexico’s history or racial and cultural mixing.

Discoveries:

LGBT Advocacy Goes Global,” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in Social Forces finds that LGBT-specific international organizations play a key role in whether nations adopt LGBT-friendly policies, more so than international organizations broadly focused on human rights.

Clippings:

The Emotional Toll of Natural Disasters,” by Jasmine Syed. The Atlantic talks to sociologist Alice Fothergill about her research on the emotional turmoil caused by Hurricane Katrina.

‘Good Guys’ and Rape Culture,” by Jean Marie Maier. In a recent op-ed for Huffington Post, sociologist Sarah Diefendorf challenges the argument that “good guys” can’t commit rape.

How White Parents’ Decisions Reinforce Racial Inequality,” by Allison J. SteinkeThe Atlantic talks to sociologist Margaret Hagerman about how white parents can reinforce racial inequality by putting their own children first.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? Trust in Institutions,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Gender, Race, and Girls in California’s Alternative Schools,” by Kenly Brown.

Midwest Sociology

‘Meet the Midwest!’ A Conversation with Dr. Hlavka,” by Amber Joy Powell and Neeraj Rajasekar.

Social Studies MN:

Local News is Not What it Used to Be,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday and welcome back! This week we’ve got a new special feature on diversity and wealth in the U.S. Congress, social science research on the migration of unaccompanied minors, and how social media can be a double-edged sword.

Special Feature:

Diversity and Wealth in Congress Today,” by Richard Zweigenhaft. In our latest feature, Zweigenhaft examines how the diversity of Congress and the wealth of its members has changed over time.

There’s Research on That!:

The Rationale and Risks of Child Migration,” by Lucas Lynch. In light of recent media attention on unaccompanied minors who migrate to the United States, we rounded up social science research on the difficult decision to migrate and the experiences of those who do.

Discoveries:

Spelling Bees to Secure Straight ‘A’s’,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that a belief in the need to competitive in the modern world drives many Asian-American parents to emphasize educational success for their children.

Clippings:

How Class Privilege Shaped Kavanaugh,” by Caity Curry. In an op-ed for The Washington PostShamus Khan provides his take on how class privilege shaped many of Brett Kavanaugh’s actions.

Social Media is a Double-Edged Sword,” by Allison J. Steinke. In an article published by MIT Technology ReviewZeynep Tufekci uses her research on political upheaval and social media to show how digital connectivity can enable large-scale movements but also has a “dark side.”

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Who Gets to Change the Subject?” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Nonviolent Protests and the Formation of Democracies,” by Hannah N. Kleman.

Council on Contemporary Families:

How Marital Transitions Affect Perceptions about Family Caregiving Responsibilities,” by Lawrence H. Ganong and Marilyn Coleman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome back! This week at TSP we’ve got research on the rise of data journalism, prison labor, and the Portuguese punk scene. You can also find sociologists’ takes on vegan social movements and how natural disasters increase racial inequality.

There’s Research on That!:

The Rise of Data Journalism,” by Allison J. Steinke. Data journalism is on the rise at media outlets worldwide and social science research shows how social forces contribute to this shift.

Pushing Back on Prison Labor,” by Isabel Arriagada. In light of the recent nationwide prison strike, we rounded up social science research on the dynamics underlying this struggle.

Discoveries:

Performing Resistance through Portuguese Punk,” by Brooke Chambers. New research in Cultural Sociology finds that small-scale and handmade products are a key element of punk culture in Portugal.

Clippings:

Part-Time Vegans May Not Help the Movement,” Caity CurryThe Atlantic highlights research by sociologists Corey Wrenn, Nina Gheihman, and Elizabeth Cherry on the many obstacles that can thwart veganism from blossoming into a large-scale social movement.

Natural Disasters May Worsen Racial Inequality,” by Mark LeeRecent research reported by Mic reveals that non-white households tend to lose wealth after a natural disaster, while white households often profit.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

The Tennis Dress Code Racket,” by Amy August.

Take a Look at Lobbying,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Immigrant Grandparents America Needs,” by Stacy Torres and Xuemei Cao.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Here at TSP headquarters, we’re settling into the semester and the cool fall weather. This week we’ve got social science research on race and social assistance in the United States, how the internet changed the dating game, and the lives saved and lost by incarceration.

There’s Research on That!:

Immigration, Welfare, and the Role of Race,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. In light of Trump advisor Stephen Miller’s plans to bar documented immigrants from citizenship if they use social assistance, we rounded up social science research on race and social assistance in the United States.

Not so Natural Disasters, ” by Erik Kojola. Hurricanes – so called natural disasters –  are not simply the result of the weather but become “disasters” because of how society shapes people’s risks and how people prepare, adapt, and respond.

Policing the Behavior of Minority Girls,” by Amber Joy Powell. Serena Williams’ recent experiences made us think about how discipling women of color’s behavior starts from a young age.

Discoveries:

Counting Incarceration’s Lives, Lost and Saved,” by Ryan Larson. New research in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior finds that incarceration saves lives through decreasing the homicide rate, but also loses lives through increasing the infant mortality rate.

Clippings:

How the Internet Changed the Dating Game,” by Allison NoblesThe Economist examines social science research about how the internet has changed dating.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Stories, Storms, and Simulations,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Parenting and the Gender Trap,” by Emily Kane.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome back to another week of sociology at TSP! This week you’ll find new research on graffiti as a subculture, how the term, “white trash” reinforces white supremacy, and reflections on why U.S. women’s soccer fans are mostly White.

There’s Research on That!:

Restorative Justice in the Classroom,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Back to school means back to important discussions about disciplinary action in the classroom.

Discoveries:

Graffiti and Social Control in Urban Spaces,” by Caity Curry. New research in The British Journal of Criminology finds that graffiti is a complex subculture.

Clippings:

How the Term “White Trash” Reinforces White Supremacy,” by Lucas Lynch. NPR’s Code Switch talks to Matt Wray about why “white trash” remains a powerful insult against poor whites and people of color alike.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Schools’ Selective Screening,” by Jean Marie Maier.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Not Just Kid Stuff: Becoming Gendered,” by Heidi Gansen and Karin A. Martin.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! We’re glad to have you back. This week at TSP we’ve got social science research on why public breastfeeding is stigmatized, the gender of your favorite beer (and who can drink it), and why sociology needs science fiction. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

Breast is Best (But Not in Public),” by Allison Nobles and Jackie Austin. To recognize how long it took public breastfeeding to be lawful in all 50 U.S. states, we rounded up social science research on why the practice still faces stigma.

Discoveries:

Gender on Tap,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Social Currents finds that consumers consider certain beers masculine and others feminine, and women often face stigma when choosing a beer, while men rarely do.

Clippings:

Recognizing Racism and Implicit Bias,” by Lucas Lynch. In a recent article in the Washington Post, Megan R. Underhill calls for Whites to take their own implicit racial prejudices seriously and speak up against such bias.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

The Role of Replays,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Why Sociology Needs Science Fiction,” by Daniel Hirshman, Philip Schwadel, Rick Searle, Erica Deadman, and Ijlal Naqvi.

Students and University Growing Up Together,” by Irenee R. Beattie and Roger J. Wyan.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Gender Matters in Every Aspect of Our Lives – And What You Need to Know to Keep Up,” by Virginia Rutter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello again! This week at TSP we’ve got social science research on youth and rave culture, new research on digital skills and education, and reflections on the history of mass deportations in the United States.

There’s Research on That!:

Youth and the Development of “Rave” Culture,” by Lucas Lynch. Social science research on raves shows that they are more than just sporadic, all-night dance parties.

Discoveries:

When is Instagram Cultural Capital? (When Your School Decides It Is),” by Jean Marie Maier. New research in the American Journal of Sociology finds that teachers interpret the value of students’ digital skills based on race and class stereotypes.

Clippings:

Mass Deportation Isn’t New,” by Caity Curry. The Conversation talks with Tanya Golash-Boza about the creation of I.C.E. and mass deportations in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Saying No To News,” by Allison J. Steinke.

Contexts:

Repeal FOSTA and Decriminalize Sex Work,” by Crystal A. Jackson and Jenny Heineman.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Why Gender Matters,” by Barbara Risman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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There’s Research on That!:

Health Minorities and the Hispanic Paradox,” by Isabel Arriagada. Social science research attempts to answer the question, why do Hispanics overall have better health outcomes than non-Hispanic Whites despite exhibiting low-income status and disproportionate exposure to stress factors associated with the immigration process?

Discoveries:

‘I Do’ for Round 2?” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in Demography finds that never being married is a valuable trait on the marriage market and these individuals can be the most selective when choosing a partner.

Clippings:

Childhood Trauma Makes Reentry More Difficult,” by De Andre’ T. BeadleThe New York Times talks to Bruce Western about the ways childhood trauma and mental health concerns make reentry more difficult for formerly incarcerated individuals.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Who Feels Religious Freedom?” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

The Sociological Imagination is Well Suited to Political Office,” by Patricia Munro.

Video: Activism and the Academy with Cornel west and Janice McCabe,” by Janice McCabe.

Council on Contemporary Families:

A Moving Target: Tracking Changes in Support for Equal Rights,” by Stephanie Coontz.

Social Studies MN:

‘I Don’t Know What to Believe:’ News Avoiders’ Consumption Habits,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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There’s Research on That!:

Me Too Behind Bars,” by Amber Joy Powell. Adding to the national conversation about sexual violence spurred by the #MeToo campaign, we rounded up social science research on sexual violence in detention.

Discoveries:

Out of Prison, Into Precarity,” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in the American Journal of Sociology finds that formerly incarcerated individuals work in intermittent, short-term, and precarious jobs to make ends meet.

Clippings:

When Gun Control Gets Godly,” by Evan StewartIn a recent article for the Washington Post, Andrew Whitehead, Landon Schnabel, and Samuel Perry explain the link between beliefs about guns and religion. 

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Contexts Symposium: After Charlottesville, Part Two,” by Contexts Magazine.

Broadening the Landscape of Blackness, An Interview with Ayana v. Jackson,” by Fiona R. Greenland.

Racial Reckoning and White Empathy: Lessons from my Mother,” by Judith Taylor.

Activism and the Academy, An Interview with Cornell West,” by Janice McCabe.

Are Karl Marx’s Claims Accurate? Partially,” by Timothy M. Gill.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Trans Kids in the 21st Century: An Interview with Tey Meadow,” by Barbara Risman.

Midwest Sociology:

“Meet the Midwest:” Dances with Dr. Hui Wilcox,” by Neeraj Rajasekar.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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