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Happy Friday everyone! This week we’ve got timely pieces on private schooling, immigration policy, fearmongering, and more. So read on if you’re looking for a little sociological perspective.

There’s Research on That!:

School Choice and Social Inequality,” by Evan Stewart and Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science comparing private and public approaches to schooling finds distinct benefits of public schools and questions whether more choice in schooling really helps everyone.

The Culture of Mass Deportation,” by Caity Curry. On the history of American immigration policy and the increasingly punitive turn it’s taken.

Discoveries:

Uncertainty and Flexibility in Trans Health Care,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in Journal of Health and Social Behavior investigates how doctors navigate trans care.

Clippings:

Nothing to Fear but Fearmongering Itself,” by Edgar CamposBarry Glassner talks to TIME about Trump’s unprecedented use of fearmongering as a political tactic.

Why We Don’t Need a White History Month,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Vox talks to Daniel Hirschman about how calls for a white history month ignore the already pervasive white privilege in U.S. society.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

“How Many Deaths? The High Rate of Bereavement among Black Americans,” by Megan Peterson.

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello hello! We’ve had another big week here at TSP, and have lots of great things to share with you. To start, we welcomed another blog to our community pages, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Check out their blog for an extensive archive of engaging commentary and research related to genocide studies. And our amazing grad board is back for the semester, which means we are back in full force on the site. We’ve got great new pieces on Trump’s cabinet, women’s movements, environmental policy, and more. So let’s get to it!

The Editor’s Desk:

In case you missed it, we celebrated the 5th anniversary of TSP last Friday. Woot! On the Eds’ Desk this week, Doug and Chris celebrate and reflect on the past five years and preview what’s to come.

There’s Research on That!:

Divesting Diversity on the Presidential Cabinet,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. While social science shows that diversity is beneficial for business and organizations, the definition of “diversity” is often warped to avoid any real discussion of inequality.

When Women Mobilize,” by Jacqui Frost. A look at research on past women’s movements sheds light on the ways that gender shapes when and how women protest, and the important roles they have played in social movement history.

Barriers Keeping Women from STEM Careers,” by Amber Joy Powell. Research on race, gender, and education reveals why women remain hidden figures in STEM.

Discoveries:

To Enforce or Encourage Green Behavior?,” by Erik Kojola. New research in Sociological Spectrum finds that environmental regulations alone will not reduce public health and environmental hazards from chemical pollution.

Clippings:

How College Became Synonymous with Sex,” by Brooke Chambers. Soc Images’ Lisa Wade writes for Time Magazine and explains how colleges went from being rigid institutions to hubs for parties and casual sex.

Okay Google, Give Me the Facts,” by Edgar CamposThe Conversation talks to Thomas Maher about how to keep “fake news” from manipulating Google’s search algorithms.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Women’s March Was Only the Beginning,” by Dana R. Fisher.

The Day After: Women’s March on Washington,” by Philip N. Cohen.

Trump’s America Comes to Washington,” by Philip N. Cohen.

Scholars Strategy Network:

What Trump Means for the Affordable Care Act,” by Colleen Grogan and Sherry Glied.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! We are enjoying our last few days of winter break here in Minnesota, but we are excited to be back in full force for the spring semester next week. In this roundup, we have our last round of Best Of and Most Popular 2016 posts, and we highlight some new pieces on charitable giving, medical school, and repertoires of contention.

There’s Research on That!:

The Social Determinants of Charitable Giving,” by Caity Curry. The holidays are an annual “giving season” for many, but research shows that social factors often determine who gives and for what.

*~!MOST POPULAR 2016!~*
Millennials Misunderstood,” by Evan Stewart. In the most viewed TROT of 2016, social research helps explain why Millennials are at once fiercely independent, but also missing key markers of adulthood.

Clippings:

Teaching Medical Students To Rethink Race,” by Caty Taborda-WhittDorothy Roberts talks to Stat News about the need for medical students to learn about the social construction of race.

Discoveries:

*~!BEST OF 2016!~*
Fifty Shades of Pay,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Voted Best Title of 2016, this Discovery details a study from Sociology of Race and Ethnicity that finds wage inequalities between dark and light skinned immigrants.

*~!MOST POPULAR 2016!~*
On Noisy Neighbors,” by Evan Stewart. The most viewed Discovery of 2016 summarizes research from AJS that shows how class and culture determine what we find “noisy.”

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Revisiting the Rationing of Medical Degrees in the United States,” by Tania M. Jenkins and Shalini Reddy.

The Contemporary American University, In Seven Emails,” by Rebecca Schuman.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Disabled American Workers Need Ongoing Social Support As Well As Jobs and Fair Wages,” by Gwendolyn Barnhart.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! We hope you are staying warm and getting close to wrapping up your fall semesters. We have some great new pieces this week, including a new podcast episode with Vanesa Ribas and a new special feature by Penny Edgell. As we head into the break, in addition to posting new pieces every week as usual, we will be highlighting our “Best Of 2016” nominees from around the site, so keep an eye out for great stuff you may have missed throughout the year.

TSP Special Features:

Seeing the White in Christian America,” by Penny Edgell. In this new special feature, Edgell explains how race, over and above religion, drove white evangelicals to vote for Trump. She argues that blanket statements about “evangelicals” that ignore differences between white and non-white Christians can work to perpetuate a culture of white privilege that systematically denies that whites, too, have racial identities and interests.

Office Hours:

Vanesa Ribas on Immigration to the New South,” with Erik Kojola. In our most recent podcast, we talk with Ribas about her new book that examines race and labor dynamics in a meat packing plant in rural North Carolina.

There’s Research on That!:

Who (Dis)Trusts Science?,” by Caty Taborda-Whitt. Research shows that trust in science is much more closely linked to political and religious commitments than educational attainment.

Discoveries:

Stigma by Association: Adult Children and Parental Incarceration,” by Amber Joy Powell. Are adult children able to create a prosocial identity outside of their parents’ felony status? New research in Deviant Behavior says yes.

Clippings:

Supermarkets and Stratification,” by Caity Curry. The Rivard Report highlights research from Heather O’Connell, Jenifer Bratter, and Lester King that finds a “tri-racial system of social stratification” in terms of access to supermarkets in Houston, TX.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Harm Done by Media Coverage of Political Disputes about Public Health Measures,” Erika Fowler and Sarah Gollust.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: Remember the Ladies Men,” by Virginia Rutter.

Contexts:

Faculty Unions, Don’t Fold Your Winning Hand!” by Syed Ali.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday all! Since we did not do a regular Roundup last week, we have a lot to catch you up on, so we’ll get right to it –

There’s Research on That!:

Who Are Fair Trade Deals Good For?,” by Erik Kojola. NAFTA and its merits have been a major topic in this year’s election. But who benefits from these kinds of trade deals and who doesn’t? We have research on that.

Sick Days and Toughing it Out,” by Elizabeth Tremmel. Wondering whether or not you should call into work because of your cold? Your decision is likely influenced by your social surroundings.

Juries and Racial Bias,” by Caity Curry.  The recent Peña-Rodriguez v. Colorado case got us thinking about the racial make-up of juries and its implications for sentencing.

Minorities in Television,” by Amber Joy Powell and Neeraj Rajasekar. While the increase in minority characters has been a major stride for equal on-air representation, sociological research suggests other problems and pitfalls remain.

Office Hours:

Douglas Hartmann on Midnight Basketball,” with Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. In our latest podcast episode, co-host Matthew chats with Doug about his new book and the 1990s crime initiative that still influences sports, race, and social policy today.

Discoveries:

Fighting Sports Arena Funding,” by Edgar Campos. New research in the Sociology of Sport Journal investigates why opposition to the public funding of large sports arenas often fails.

Clippings:

Escaping Reality with Virtual Love,” by Neeraj RajasekarMasahiro Yamada talks to The Guardian about the constraints of dating and relationships in Japan and why Japanese youth are turning to virtual love as a result.

The Resiliency of the Death Penalty in the United States,” by Caity CurryPublic Radio International asks Susan Sharp about the continued support for the death penalty in the U.S.

NFL Suspensions: From Fines to the Sidelines,” by Edgar Campos. TSP’s Doug Hartmann is featured in a recent New York Times article about effective punishments in the NFL.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

How Rights Movements Can Deal with Backlashes against Supreme Court Decisions,” by Alexander Lovell.

Why Laws Targeting Non-Citizen Immigrants Affect Citizen Family Members and Associates, Too,” by Jane Lilly López.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: Sexual Assault on Campus,” by Elizabeth Armstrong and Jamie Budnick.

Gender Inequalities in Dual-Earner, College Educated Couples and the Transition to Parenthood,” by Jill Yavorsky, Claire Kamp Dush, and Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello everyone! We are taking a break from our regular Roundup this week, but we do have a few things to share with you, including some nerdy social science jokes and cute animal pictures (you’re welcome). We’ll be back with a full report next Friday, but do stop by the site if you are in need of some reading and/or listening material over the weekend.

For many of us, this weekend will be full of conversations with friends and family we don’t see often. Given the heightened tensions surrounding the U.S. presidential election, there are a few posts around TSP this week that offer suggestions for constructively engaging with friends and family who have different political views. Below are some highlights —

There’s Research on That!:

Table Talk for Thanksgiving,” by the TSP Grad Board.

“Research shows that family dinner does not actually increase well-being in and of itself – it only works if the meal-time discussion is used to actually engage with those at the table and learn about their day-to-day lives. In other words, ‘polite’ conversation may not be the best way to bring everyone together.”

Contexts:

The Case for Seeing Your Trump-voting Family this Holiday Season,” by Brittany Dernberger.

“There’s a lot of power in being in relationship with others. Taking off our ‘expert’ academic hats, getting outside of our intellectual and likeminded echo chambers, and really listening and sharing with people we love who have divergent viewpoints can be illuminating.”

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Hello and happy Friday all. Like many of you and others, we are continuing to grapple with the U.S. election, and a number of pieces around the site this week are reflections on what got us here and projections about what it might mean for social policy, social justice, and social science.

The Editors’ Desk:

The 2016 Election and the Vocation of Social Science,” by TSP co-editor Chris Uggen. Chris anticipates some of the obstacles that social science research will face in the near future, and urges social scientists to work with, not against, one another to overcome them.

“Sociologist-on-sociologist violence will get us nowhere … The Society Pages believes that sociology needs a ‘big tent’ to prosper – one embracing both our pure science wing and our social activist wing. Because we don’t have a lot of weight to throw around, we’d likely be further diminished if we ‘cleave it in twain.’ So I’m going to continue to love all y’all – even when y’all disagree.”

Special Features:

The Whitelash Against Diversity,” by Jennifer Lee. In this timely special feature, Lee highlights research that helps explain the significant “whitelash” among white Americans that resulted in a Trump presidency.

There’s Research on That!:

The Meaning of Menstruation,” by Allison Nobles. Recent innovations in birth control are being used as a way to improve the quality of life for those of us who get periods, but these medical developments affect the social meaning of menstruation.

UFC 205 and the Social Phenomenon of Major Sporting Events,” by Edgar Campos. Just in time for UFC 205, we highlight research on MMA fighting and why people love major sporting events.

Discoveries:

Neighborhood Associations Need Time to Reduce Crime,” by Ryan Larson. New research in Criminology complicates the relationship between the presence of neighborhood associations and crime rates.

Clippings:

Paternity Leave in Japan,” by Neeraj RajasekarEunmi Mun talks to the Seeker about work and gender norms in Japan.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Editors Syed Ali and Philip Cohen offer their thoughts on what a Trump presidency means for sociologists in “Trumped.”

Scholars Strategy Network:

Can Pro-Choice and Pro-Life Activists Recognize the Socioeconomic Realities of Abortion?” by Hannah Phillips.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! Whether you’re gearing up for the election, Halloween, or just a nice weekend where a little extra candy intake is likely to go unnoticed, we have some sociology on that. See below for our latest content and stop by for more!

The Editors’ Desk:

‘They Out Here Sayin’ for $800:’ SNL’s Most Hilarious and Insightful Skit of the Season,” by Doug Hartmann. “Doug? Are you sure you’re ready to play Black Jeopardy?”

Teaching TSP:

The Benefits of Reverse Outlines,” by Jack Delehanty. In the second installment of our Teaching Writing series, Jack offers some suggestions for integrating writing instruction with course content by using reverse outlines.

There’s Research on That!:

Women in Law Enforcement,” by Amber Joy Powell. Research on female police officers suggests that they are less likely to use force, but are often expected to do more “emotional labor” than male officers.

Brazil’s Sporting Exploits,” by Edgar Campos. Brazil has played host to quite a few sporting events recently. Was it worth it?

Discoveries:

How We Remember Genocide,” by j. Wahutu Siguru. New research in Sociological Forum explores how survivors remember the causes of a genocide.

Clippings:

The Selective Sympathies of Trump Supporters,” by Edgar CamposArlie Russell Hochschild talks to The New Yorker about the ways blue-collar white men selectively support “line cutting.”

Why All the Trump Allegations are Surfacing at Once,” by Neeraj RajasekarBrendan Nyhan tells New York Magazine why women might feel more confident speaking out against Trump now.

What Kind of Nationalist Are You?,” by j. Wahutu Siguru. The Pacific Standard uses research by Bart Bonikowski and Paul DiMaggio to explain Trump’s version of nationalism.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Why Online Activism Is Unlikely To Reduce Political Inequalities in the U.S.,” by Jennifer Oser, Marc Hooghe, and Sofie Marien.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday everyone! We’ve got some great new pieces for your perusal below, and be sure to stop by throughout the week for the latest.

There’s Research on That!:

Hillary, Interrupted,” by Caty Taborda-Whitt. Research reveals the impetus behind Trump’s many interruptions during the first presidential debate and the gender inequality it perpetuates.

When Public School Is No Longer Public,” by Elizabeth Tremmel. Are charter schools as “public” as they are defined to be? Sociologists find that they operate in legal gray areas, making their distinctions from public schools complicated.

“You Can’t Sit with Us,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. In the spirit of National Bullying Prevention Month, we round up research on who gets bullied and why.

Discoveries:

Gender-based Violence Against Men in Darfur,” by j. Siguru Wahutu. “Although this violence is in some ways about physical domination, it is primarily meant to symbolically dominate and denigrate both the victims and surviving community members.”

Clippings:

The Patterns of Police Force,” by Ryan Larson. Sociologist Joscha Legewie talks about the ways police are more likely to use force against black suspects after the shooting of a police officer.

The Influence of Naturalized Voters, by Edgar Campos. Writing for the LA Times, sociologist Manuel Pastor discusses the potential impact of newly naturalized citizens if they show up at the polls in November.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Hamilton’s Immigrant America,” by Philip Kasinitz.

Gender Politics and Taming the Alpha Male Harem Master,” by Mimi Schippers.

The Problem of Urban Sprawl,” by Thomas Laidley.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Strict Voter Identification Laws Advantage Whites—And Skew American Democracy to the Right,” by Zoltan Hajnal, Nazita Lajevardi, and Lindsay Nielson.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Is TANF Working for Struggling Millennial Parents?” by Shawn Fremstad.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday everyone! The TSP grad board is back in full force this week with an array of interesting and timely posts, from welfare in Oregon, to mourning on social media, to getting in trouble at school. Also, Contexts is rolling out their latest issue, which covers Hamilton, the Oscars, street dancing in Compton, and bonfires in Belfast, so be sure to keep checking in with them as they make different pieces from the latest issue available online over the next few weeks.

There’s Research on That!:

Restorative Justice in the Classroom,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Back to school means back to important discussions about disciplinary action in the classroom.

When ‘Nice Guys’ Rape,” by Amber Joy Powell. Feminist scholarship highlights the pervasiveness of rape culture and helps us pinpoint how it reproduces notions that only “bad guys” commit “real rape.”

Discoveries:

Variety is the Spice of Life, but Are Typical Dishes Best?” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in the American Sociological Review examines the differences between consumers who prioritize variety in the genres of food and movies they consume and those who prefer typicality.

Clippings:

Why Oregon is So Generous,” by Ryan Larson . Oregon has one of the most robust welfare systems in the U.S., but social scientists shed light on some of the racist and classist reasons why that might be.

Challenging ‘Normal’ Bodies, One Girl at a Time,” by Amber Joy Powell. Female Olympians are fighting back against the stigma of larger, more muscular female figures.

Mourning with Social Media,” by Edgar Campos. How Twitter is making the mourning of others more open and public than it’s ever been.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Contexts is rolling out its latest issue, and new individual pieces will be made available online each week. See below for the table of contents, a letter from the editors, and one of their new feature articles.

A Cornucopia of Sociological Goodness,” from editors Syed Ali and Phil Cohen.

Summer 2016 Table of Contents.”

The King of Compton,” by Jooyoung Lee.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Why Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Programs Succeed or Fail on the Frontlines of Welfare Reform,” by Jennifer Randles.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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