Friday Roundup

There’s Research on That!:

Migration and the U.S. Southern Border,” by Lucas Lynch. Migration on the southern border is a hot topic in U.S. media and politics, so we gathered research on border policies and their impacts on migrants and migration flows.

A Sociological Look at Marijuana and Its Users,” by Neeraj Rajasekar and Ryan Steel. In light of 4/20 or “Weed Day,” we rolled up some research on social processes and marijuana use.

Discoveries:

Systemic Sexism in the Military,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society finds that bureaucracies and male-dominated hierarchies within the U.S. military facilitate discriminatory behavior towards women.

Clippings:

National Geographic’s “New” Take on Race,” by Chloe Hendrix. The Washington Post talks to sociologist Victor Ray about National Geographic‘s “new” conversation about race.

How Wealthy Parents Reproduce College Success,” by Jasmine Syed. The Washington Post features a study by Laura HamiltonJosipa Roksa, and Kelly Nielsen about the role parents play in college students’ success.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

The Sociology Behind the X-Files,” by Isabel Arriagada.

Contexts:

Why Clinton Lost, An Interview with Melissa Harris-Perry,” by Hana Brown.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Negotiating Opportunities for Middle Class Children: An Interview with Jessica McCrory Calarco,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome to the first Friday the 13th of 2018. This week we’ve got new work on gender in waiting rooms, looking “illegal,” and why space matters…physical space, that is. But if you just got excited about UFOs, we’ve got that too!

There’s Research on That!:

What Drives Punitive Attitudes in the United States?” by Caity Curry. We rounded up social science research on social factors that influence Americans’ punitive attitudes.

Why Physical Space Matters for Universities,” by Isabel ArriagadaSocial science research tells us that the way a space is organized matters greatly for the type of experience individuals have at universities and other organizations.

Discoveries:

When Waiting is Women’s Work,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. New research in Sociological Forum finds that men and women in medical waiting rooms interact in ways that conform to gendered expectations and reinforce the conception that men’s time (and work) is more valuable than women’s.

Clippings:

No, Immigrants Don’t Cause Crime,” by Brooke ChambersThe New York Times features research by Robert Adelman and colleagues demonstrating that increases in immigration do not cause increases in crime.

The Sociology Behind the X-Files,” by Isabel ArriagadaNew York Magazine talks to Joseph O. Baker about the social context behind Americans’ beliefs about UFOs.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? News Consumption,” by Ryan Larson, Evan Stewart, and Andrew M. Lindner.

Redefining what it means to be #YourAverageMuslim,” by Inaash Islam.

Contexts:

Looking ‘Illegal’,” by Chandra Reyna.

Gunshops and Crime,” by Eric Stone.

Council on Contemporary Families:

CCF 2018 Conference Report,” by Linda Young.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! This week we’ve got new pieces on how families talk about race (or don’t), what happens when fathers who are primary caregivers go to prison, and why diversity in Hollywood pays off.

There’s Research on That!:

Fashioning Fashion, Creating Couture Part II,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. As a follow-up to part I from last week, we compiled social science research on the ways fashion matters for inequality and identity.

Discoveries:

Families Talk about Race (or Don’t),” by Lucas Lynch. New research in Ethnic and Racial Studies finds that White families lack either the willingness or the ability to talk about race.

Incarcerating Fatherhood” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in Punishment & Society finds that for men serving as primary caregivers before entering prison, fatherhood is a difficult identity to maintain while incarcerated.

Clippings:

Hollywood Diversity Pays Off,” by Nahrissa Rush. NPR reviews Darnell Hunt‘s Hollywood Diversity Report that shows how racial diversity can lead to big payoffs in the entertainment industry.

Understanding Resentment in Rural America,” by Jasmine Syed. Vox talks to  Robert Wuthnow about resentment in predominantly White, rural towns in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What Makes Prejudice Trend on Twitter?” by Brooke Chambers.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Here Comes Arielle Kuperberg,” by Virginia Rutter.

Social Studies MN:

Politics, Public Discourse and the Press,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello Again! As we wrap up March and move into April, we’ve got social science research on fashion, a look at what makes discrimination trend on Twitter, and the prevalence of “white flight” in America.

There’s Research on That!:

Professionalization in the Working World,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. In light of the high rates of turnover in Washington, D.C., we rounded up social science research on professionalization.

Fashioning Fashion, Creating Couture: Part I,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. We’ve got sociological research on why fashion is a valuable case for understanding social life.

Discoveries:

What Makes Discrimination Trend on Twitter?” by Brooke Chambers. New research in the American Journal of Sociology finds that after the passage of Arizona’s SB 1070 law, people who previously held an anti-immigrant stance posted tweets with greater negative content more frequently.

Clippings:

Me Too on the Manufacturing Line,” by Jasmine Syed. The New York Times talks to Abigail Saguy about gender discrimination in blue-collar workplaces.

White Flight Still Drives Neighborhood Segregation,” by Caity Curry. The Pacific Standard highlights recent research by Samuel Kye showing that white flight remains a reality in many American neighborhoods.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

‘Concerted Cultivation’ and the March For Our Lives,” by Jay Livingston.

When Data Can’t DJ,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Trump365,” by Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

The Algorithmic Rise of the ‘Alt-Right’,” by Jessie Daniels.

Council on Contemporary Families:

50 years since the LeClair Affair, Is Living Together Outside of Marriage a Problem?” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Allison here, again! My apologies for missing the last couple of weeks. Let me get you caught up! We’ve got pieces on the social science of spring break, how we remember historical figures, how teachers understand inequality in schools, and recognizing the diversity of gay parents.

There’s Research on That!:

The Social Science of Spring Break,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Partying for spring break is sociological, and we have the research to prove it!

How We Remember Historical Figures,” by Amber Joy Powell and Brooke Chambers. For Women’s History Month, we rounded up social science research on collective memory.

Discoveries:

Taking the Pulse of Spirituality in Real Time,” by Jacqui Frost. New research in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion finds that people do not experience their spirituality as a constant, unchanging trait.

How Schools Shape Teachers’ Perceptions of Inequality,” by Caity Curry. New research in Sociology of Education finds that school context shapes how teachers understand inequality.

Clippings:

The Politics of Blaming Single Mothers for Poverty,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. In a recent article in The New York TimesDavid BradyRyan M. Finnigan and Sabine Hübgen push back against criticisms of single mothers and ask why the United States responds with stigmatization rather than assistance.

Do Sports Fans Revel by Rampaging?” by Jenn Edwards. The Washington Post talks with Jerry M. Lewis about violence committed by sports fans.

Recognizing Diversity in Gay Parenting,” by Jasmine Syed. Slate discusses the diversity of gay parents with Suzanna Walters and Megan Carroll.

Do College Degrees Mean Less Disease?” by Chloe Hendrix. The Washington Post draws on work from Andrew J. Cherlin and Jennifer Karas Montez to understand the relationship between college degrees and health.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

A Data Dive into Competitive A Cappella,” by Evan Stewart.

Gender, Bitcoin and Altcoins,” by Joseph Gelfer.

What’s Trending? The Popularity of Gun Control,” by Ryan Larson and Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Virginia Won’t Stop Blogging,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

Estrangement and the Bridge between Parent and Child,” by Luilly Gonzalez.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hi Sociology-Friends! Happy March! This week we’ve got resources on public sociology, social science research on sexual double standards, and new research on the gender gap in crime rates across countries.

The Editor’s Desk:

On the Eds’ Desk this week, Evan Stewart presents some of our favorite resources on public sociology.

There’s Research on That!:

Sexual Double Standards,” by Amber Joy Powell. We rounded up social science research on the persistence of sexual double standards between men and women.

Discoveries:

Who’s Shelling out for Household Services?” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in the Journal of Marriage and Family finds that men’s income, not women’s, determines if couples hire household services.

Explaining the Gender Gap in Crime Cross-Nationally,” by Ryan Larson. New research in Criminology finds that young men and women commit crimes at more similar levels in countries with more gender equality.

Clippings:

Will #MeToo Widen the Political Divide?” by Jenn Edwards. The New York Times talks to Musa al-Gharbi, Joanna Pepin, and David Cotter about how the #MeToo movement may affect the U.S. political divide.

Misleading Census Counts May Stoke Immigration Fears,” by Lucas Lynch. In a recent article in The Washington Post, sociologist Richard Alba argues that the census over-estimates counts of racial and ethnic minorities, a move that can seriously affect politics and policies in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Digital Drag?” by Allison Nobles.

Contexts:

A New Black Holiday, or Why W.E.B. Du Bois’s 150th Birthday Matters,” by Marcus Anthony Hunter.

Council on Contemporary Families:

‘Unconventional Wisdom’ on Creating and Conceiving Families in the 21st C” by Virginia Rutter.

CCF Honors Nina Martin, ProPublica, on Abortion, Pregnancy, and Maternal Health,” by Christie Boxer.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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It’s all fun and games until….someone brings up politics at the Olympics. Sorry! But if you’ve had enough of politics, we’ve also got social science on why learning a new language is beneficial, different conceptions of race in the Americas, and gentrification.

There’s Research on That!:

Political Games at the Olympics,” by Brooke Chambers and Doug Hartmann. Here’s some sociological work on political effects of the Olympic Games.

Learn a Language, Change the World,” by Isabel Arriagada. Turns out there are some great sociological reasons to learn a new language.

Conceptions of Race in the Americas,” by Lucas Lynch. In this piece, we compile social science research on how race shapes social life in the Americas.

Discoveries:

School Choice Policies Drive Gentrification,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. New research in Sociology of Education finds that school choice policies contribute to gentrification.

Clippings:

Redlining Then, Gentrification Now,” by Jasmine Syed. NPR talks to John Schlichtman about the negative consequences of gentrification and how to counteract them.

Is Probation the Solution to High Conviction Rates?” by Nahrissa Rush. PBS asks Michelle Phelps to weigh in on probation as a solution to high rates of felony convictions.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Talk with Xavier Guadalupe-Diaz on IPV in Transgender Communities,” by Tasia Clemons.

Social Studies MN:

A New Look at Nuclear Negotiations,” by Evan Stewart.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Whether you need a break from the post-Valentine’s Day candy sales or watching the Winter Olympics, we’ve got the goods! Check out our latest special feature on Jeremy Lin’s dreadlocks, social science research on gender and bodies, and new research on the role real estate agents play in racial segregation.

Special Feature:

Much Ado about a Hairdo? Unraveling the Social Significance of Jeremy Lin’s Dreadlocks,” by Stephen Cho Suh, Kyle Green, and Alex Manning. In light of NBA All-Star Weekend, starting tomorrow, Suh, Green, and Manning reflect on the significance of Jeremy Lin’s dreadlocks for sport, race, and culture.

There’s Research on That!:

Gender, Bodies, and the Valentine’s Day Script,” by Isabel Arriagada and Allison Nobles. To celebrate Valentine’s Day, we rounded up social science research on gender and bodies.

Discoveries:

How Real Estate Agents Perpetuate Racial Segregation,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in Sociological Forum finds that real estate agents use business practices that perpetuate structural racism.

Racism Disadvantages Third-Generation Immigrants,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in Sociology of Race & Ethnicity finds that economic and educational outcomes for third-generation Mexican-Americans are not better than second-generation Mexican-Americans, and are significantly worse than Whites.

Clippings:

The Economics of Genocide Prevention,” by Brooke ChambersThe Washington Post talks to Aliza Luft about economic strategies for genocide prevention.

Is Social Integration the Key to Happy Marriages?” by Allison Nobles. In a recent article in The New York TimesStephanie Coontz reviews social science research demonstrating that a flourishing social life can lead to a better marriage.

Learning from the Crime Drop,” by Chloe Hendrix.  In The New York Times, Patrick Sharkey discusses his research on both the causes and social benefits of the violent crime drop.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? Feeling the Love,” by Ryan Larson and Evan Stewart.

What’s That Fact? A Tricky Graph on Terror,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Paternal Incarceration and Children’s Schooling Contexts: Intersecting Inequalities of Educational Opportunity,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome sociology fans! If you’re also a fan of the Winter Olympics, we have sociological research on sporting mega-events and reflections on this year’s games. If you’re not a fan, we’ve also got sociological work on the meaning of racism, new research on engaging audiences on social media, and recent work on how police use big data.

There’s Research on That!:

Sporting Mega-Events and Urban Inequality,” by Caity Curry. In light of recent sporting events, like the Winter Olympics and the Super Bowl, we’ve round up research on mega-events and urban inequality.

Different Dimensions of Racism,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science reviews how racism goes beyond prejudicial attitudes and overt discrimination.

Discoveries:

Keeping Audiences Engaged on Social Media,” by Brooke Chambers. New research in the American Sociological Review finds that the key to successful messaging is switching back and forth between rational and emotional argument styles.

Zoom in and Enhance: Big Data meets Crime,” by Isabel Arriagada. Another study in the American Sociological Review examines how police’s use of big data has dramatically increased the number of people and institutions under surveillance.

Clippings:

Why Fines are a Flawed Solution to Mass Incarceration,” by Jasmine Syed. The New York Times talks to Alexes Harris about how fines and fees may not be the best alternative to incarceration.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Beyond Racial Binaries: How ‘White’ Latinos Can Experience Racism,” by Jonathan Harrison.

Contexts:

Can Hollywood Separate Gold from White?” by Matthew W. Hughey.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Noni Gaylord-Harden Reframes Violence and Youth,” by Eunice Owusu.

Social Studies MN:

Multiple Screens Are Not Always Bad For Attention,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Well, it’s Groundhog Day, again. In case you need another reason to love this holiday, we rounded up social science research on why rituals are important. We’ve also got reflections on race and athlete protests, and new research on parenthood and gang membership.

Well, it’s Groundhog Day, again. In case you need another reason to love this holiday, we rounded up social science research on why rituals are important. We’ve also got reflections on race and athlete protests, and new research on parenthood and gang membership.

Well, it’s Groundhog Day, again. In case you need another reason to love this holiday, we rounded up social science research on why rituals are important. We’ve also got reflections on race and athlete protests, and new research on parenthood and gang membership.

(If you’re feeling confused, see here)

Special Feature:

Unsportsmanlike Conduct? Reflections on a Tumultuous NFL Season,” by Doug Hartmann, Kyle Green, and Alex Manning. In our latest feature, Hartmann, Green, and Manning reflect on sport, race, and athlete activism.

There’s Research on That!:

Groundhog Day and the Purpose of Strange Rituals,” by Allison Nobles and Jacqui Frost. Groundhog Day got us wondering about the purpose of strange rituals, so we compiled sociological perspectives on why rituals matter.

Missing Crime Data and Why We Need It,” by Caity Curry. After the FBI released the 2016 Uniform Crime Report missing key tables from previous years, we wanted to know how and why researchers utilize this data. Turns out, it’s pretty important.

Discoveries:

Does Parenthood Disrupt Gang Membership?” by Amber Joy Powell. New Research in Criminology finds that first-time parenthood reduces gang affiliation, but parenthood’s impact differs by gender.

Clippings:

Firearms and Mental Illness Matter More for Suicide than Mass Shootings,” by Evan Stewart. In an article for The Conversation, Miranda Lynne Baumann and Brent Teasdale explain that firearm access for people with mental illnesses is much more threatening to their own safety than to the safety of others.

Is Attraction about Evolution or Culture?” by Jean Marie DeOrnellasLisa Wade talks to The Washington Post about the cultural side of who we find attractive.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Selling the Sport Spectacle,” by Evan Stewart.

Children Learn Rules for Romance in Preschool,” by Allison Nobles.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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