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Hello and happy Friday everyone! We here at TSP HQ are wrapping up another great semester with research on binge drinking, collective mourning, and ex-felon employment. While we will remain hard at work bringing you all the best in sociological research over the summer, we are going to scale back our Roundups to once a month until September. So, you won’t hear from us again until June but be sure to keep stopping by to check out what we are up to in the interim!

There’s Research on That!:

When Fans Cry: Why We Mourn the Loss of Celebrities” by Amber Joy Powell. “People mourn the death of celebrities who hold connections to emotional events; that is, people do not solely grieve the loss of that celebrity, but also the loss of the memories associated with that celebrity.”

Discoveries:

Binge Drinking on the Bubble,” by Ryan Larson. Peer pressure can create a potent pull to binge drink, but only for those with a medium genetic propensity.

Clippings:

Ex-felon Employment,” by Ryan Larson. NPR talks to Devah Pager about how felons fare when they gain employment.

Give Methods a Chance:

Madison Van Oort on Discourse Analysis & Studying Commercials,” with Kyle Green. Kyle and Madison chat about their collaborative work on the ways commercials employ the crisis of masculinity to sell products.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Converging Gender Wage Gap, 1980-2012,” by Craig Upright.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Why is Pay for Caregiving Work So Low?” by Paula England.

Scholars Strategy Network:

What We Know – And Need to Learn – About Progress Against Sex Discrimination in Education,” by Celene Reynolds.

And a Few From the Community Pages:

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It is officially spring here in Minneapolis, but the erratic weather has not rained out our research roundup! Be sure to stop by and check out our latest.

There’s Research on That!:

Spring Cleaning,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. On the sociological significance of dust and who is responsible for getting rid of it.

Rural, White Women Getting Sicker, Dying Quicker,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. How stress and timing of childbirth disproportionately affect poor white women.

Clippings:

Why Pay Inequality is So Stubborn,” by Allison Nobles. “Unfortunately, while a small number of women moving into top positions may help those below, when large numbers of women enter traditionally male-dominated fields, the results are not so rosy. Why? Women’s work simply isn’t valued as highly as men’s.”

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Microscopic Hair Comparison and the Sociology of Science,” by Simon A. Cole and Troy Duster.

Germany Avoids Going Gray,” by Carrie Clarady.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Way We Still Never Were,” by Stephanie Coontz. Be sure to check out Coontz’s substantially revised and updated edition of The Way We Never Were.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello, everyone, and happy NOT Tax Day! With a brief respite from the primary election news cycle this week, we at TSP have been rounding up research on everything from harm reduction to hookup culture. Enjoy!

The Editors’ Desk

Larry Jacobs’ Public Scholarship.” Chris Uggen highlights Jacobs as a model for research and media outreach.

There’s Research on That!:

“Bringing Harm Reduction to America’s Heroin Problem” by Austin Jenkins and Allison Nobles. Research shows how new approaches to drug treatment increase safety and lower stigma.

Clippings:

Corporate Diversity Won’t Solve Income Inequality” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Kevin Leicht explains why in an in The Atlantic.

Tall, Thin, and Raking It In” by Allison Nobles. Amy Blackstone talks to Broadly about pay gaps and personal appearance.

From our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Can Universities Maintain Diversity without Directly Considering Race in Admissions?” Mark C. Long investigates alternatives to affirmative action and finds a few hazards along the way.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Date’s Not Dead” by Arielle Kuperberg and Joseph E. Padgett. New research shows hookup culture is popular on college campuses, but so is more traditional dating. Tinder hasn’t trumped it all!

Contexts:

Shallow, Self-Absorbed, and Aggressively Competitive ‘Primates’.” Myra Marx Ferree talks ethnographic methods while reviewing Primates of Park Avenue. 

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! We’ve got a little bit of everything for you this week, from gender segregation in the workplace, to white evangelical Christians and their voting habits, to data activism and the Panama Papers. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

Colorism and Divisions Among Black Women,” by Amber Joy Powell. How casting for the new Nina Simone biopic highlights the consequences of colorism.

Discoveries:

Trickle-Down Gender Parity?” by Allison Nobles. When women are employed in upper level positions, what happens to the women left near the bottom?

Clippings:

A-Ok-Cupid,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Sociologist Michael Rosenfeld dispels negative assumptions about online dating.

From our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Why America’s White Evangelical Christians Turn Out at High Rates in Midterm Elections,” by Lydia Bean.

Council on Contemporary Families:

How is Celebrity Intimate Partner Violence Covered? Race and Gender Patterns Abound,” by Molly McNulty.

Contexts:

Talking Happiness, Security, and Counterinsurgency with Laleh Khalili,” by Steven Thrasher.

The Paper Ceiling,” by Brittany Dernberger.

How to End Institutional Racism,” by the Contexts Grad Team.

The Unborn and the Undead.” Viewpoints by Susan Markens, Katrina Kimport, Drew Halfmann, Kimala Price, and Deana A. Rohlinger.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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No foolin’ from us today, there is just a lot of great new content over on TSP this week! From family policy to freegans, we’ve got you covered.

The Editors’ Desk:

The Politics of Poverty Policy“. Doug Hartmann highlights new work from the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality.

There’s Research on That!:

The Social Ties of Terrorism” by Evan Stewart. In the face of recent tragedies, social science helps us make sense of the motives and methods behind terror.

Discoveries:

Freegan Foragers’ Moral Mission” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research from Alex Barnard digs into dumpster diving.

Clippings:

The Noble Poverty in Kids’ Movies” by Allison NoblesNew York Magazine features research on how Disney downplays social class.

Half of Americans Will Experience Poverty” by Neeraj RajasekarSalon follows up on this disturbing new social fact.

Criminalizing Black Schoolgirls” by Amber Joy Powell. New reports shed light on how schools disproportionately punish girls of color.

Give Methods a Chance:

This week Kyle Green talks to R. Tyson Smith about ethnography

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Strict Voter Identification Laws Advantage Whites—And Skew American Democracy to the Right.” The title says it all, and new research from Zoltan Hajnal, Nazita Lajevardi, and Lindsay Nielson breaks it down.

Council on Contemporary Families:

3Q: Family Inequality with Philip Cohen” Quick questions, quick quips. “The culture wars over family politics always return to gender difference itself”

Contexts:

#callmecaitlyn and contemporary trans* visibility” by D’Lane Compton and Tristan Bridges. “The public celebration and recognition of transgender people is a start, but it has not yet been matched by achievements in gender equality and diversity.”

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello from Chicago! The TSP crew is in the Windy City this weekend for the Midwest Sociological Association’s 2016 meeting, but not to worry, we took a quick break from the panels and presentations to round up our latest coverage for you.

The Editors’ Desk:

Race, Resentment, Rage,” by Doug Hartmann. Doug reflects on some of the larger racial contexts surrounding the rise of Trump.

There’s Research on That!:

FBiPhone and Coders’ Free Speech,” by Jacqui Frost. On whether or not code is speech and the very real consequences of what it can say.

Clippings:

A Decade of Housing Occupation in Turin’s Olympic Village,” by Allison NoblesSergio Scamuzzi talks to The Guardian about what becomes of Olympic villages once the games ends.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Measuring The Social Impact of Mass Imprisonment on America’s Black and White Families and Communities,” by Hedwig Lee, Tyler McCormick, Margaret T. Hicken, and Christopher Wildeman.

Winning Public Arguments About Renewable Energy,” by Johannes Urpelainen.

Council on Contemporary Families:

This is for All the Single People,” by Braxton Jones.

Contexts:

How to Do Ethnography Right.” Syed Ali and Phil Cohen organize a special forum on best practices and important debates among ethnographers.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello, everyone! This week was spring break for the TSP team, but our R&R still includes research. Here’s a look at our latest coverage.

Discoveries:

Fifty Shades of Pay” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New work from Alexis Rosenblum, William Darity Jr., Angel L. Harris, and Tod G. Hamilton shows how skin tone pairs with the paycheck.

Clippings:

The Climate Change Campaign” by Allison NoblesThe Washington Post rounds up research on who believes in climate change and why.

Why Straight Women Rarely Propose Marriage” by Amber Joy PowellThe New York Times looks at how marriage as an institution is changing, but some traditions are staying they same.

There’s Research on That!:

Revictimization after Sexual Assault” by Amber Joy Powell. While they aim to catch perpetrators, research shows how the criminal justice system risks challenging victims as well.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Paper Ceiling” by Brittany Dernberger. New research shows journalists’ networks often mean women are less likely to end up in news coverage.

Smoking Drives Mortality Inequalities” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner. Education associates with better health, and it looks like smoking is a big part of the link.

And A Few From The Community Pages:

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Boy, do we have a lot to round up for you this week! We’ve got an array of new pieces on diversity and inequality in church, in sports, and at work, plenty on the presidential elections, and a few on families and parenting. See below for more!

The Editors’ Desk:

Beyonce in the Belly of the Sporting Beast,” by Doug Hartmann. Why Americans expect conversations about race and gender to stay off the field.

Scholars Strategy Network’s Timely Election Work.” This week, we highlight some timely pieces from SSN on politics, including an interview from their podcast, NoJargon.

Discoveries:

Sunday Morning Segregation,” by Evan Stewart.  “For American religion, it isn’t just about who chooses the pews; we have to look at who builds them, too.”

Clippings:

Reproducing Racial Wealth and Education Gaps,” by Amber Powell. The Atlantic turns to sociological research to challenge myths of a post-racial America.

Talk Parenting: Opening Up About Sex, Drugs, and Booze,” by Allison Nobles. How a new generation of parents are talking with their kids about sex and drugs rather than just saying no.

Seeing Diversity through Blind Hiring,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Why companies need to consider skill first, and “fit” later.

There’s Research on That!:

Milgram’s Shocking Social Science,” by Ryan Larson. Apart from Milgram’s success at demonstrating the scary side of obedience, his studies were a major driver of ethical debates in social science that continue today.

Give Methods a Chance:

Jay Borchert on Conducting Interviews in Prison,” with Sarah Lageson.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

What We Know – And Need to Learn – About Progress Against Sex Discrimination in Higher Education,” by Celene Reynolds.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Three Questions with Linda Nielsen,” with Molly McNulty. Nielsen answer questions about her research on father-daughter relationships.

Contexts:

Keeping it Real with Twitter and #RealAcademicBios,” by Stephen Barnard.

And A Few From The Community Pages:

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Hello, everyone! While the pundits are sorting out everything that happened this week, we’re here with a look at the best of TSP post-Super Tuesday.

The Editors’ Desk:

The Sociology of Nate Silver and 538: #TSPpolitics” With Super Tuesday come and gone, but polling and projections still going strong, our editors brought back a classic piece by Andrew Lindner from The Social Side of Politics. 

There’s Research on That!:

Safer Sex for Male Inmates” by Sara Anderson. A guest post this week rounds up research on the growing problem of sexual health in America’s prison system.
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Hello hello! This week we have a slew of great new stuff on a wide array of current events, including diversity at the Oscars, environmental inequality in Flint, and working family policies across the country. Be sure to stop by or see below for more!

The Editors’ Desk:

Religion and U.S. Elections: #TSP Politics.” This week, we highlight a classic white paper from our Politics volume by Joe Gerteis on the ties between religion and political power.

There’s Research on That!:

There’s Something in the Water,” by Sarah Catherine Billups and Caty Taborda. Sociological research shows how the Flint water crisis is no fluke. more...