Happy Friday everyone! This week we’ve got timely pieces on private schooling, immigration policy, fearmongering, and more. So read on if you’re looking for a little sociological perspective.

There’s Research on That!:

School Choice and Social Inequality,” by Evan Stewart and Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science comparing private and public approaches to schooling finds distinct benefits of public schools and questions whether more choice in schooling really helps everyone.

The Culture of Mass Deportation,” by Caity Curry. On the history of American immigration policy and the increasingly punitive turn it’s taken.

Discoveries:

Uncertainty and Flexibility in Trans Health Care,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in Journal of Health and Social Behavior investigates how doctors navigate trans care.

Clippings:

Nothing to Fear but Fearmongering Itself,” by Edgar CamposBarry Glassner talks to TIME about Trump’s unprecedented use of fearmongering as a political tactic.

Why We Don’t Need a White History Month,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Vox talks to Daniel Hirschman about how calls for a white history month ignore the already pervasive white privilege in U.S. society.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

“How Many Deaths? The High Rate of Bereavement among Black Americans,” by Megan Peterson.

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hey everyone! Lots of great new stuff this week, including a new Office Hours podcast. So let’s get to it!

Office Hours:

Natasha Warikoo on The Diversity Bargain,” with Neeraj Rajasekar. In this episode, we talk with Warikoo about her new book and the ways that elite students understand diversity and make sense of their social positions.

There’s Research on That!:

White Working Class Voters,” by Erik KojolaThe election of Donald Trump left many wondering why large numbers of working class whites voted for a candidate who supports policies that are likely to have a negative impact on them. You guessed it — there’s research on that. 

Gendering Intelligence,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. A recent study found that young girls are more likely to attribute “brilliance” to men. Research on gender stereotypes and socialization helps explain why.

Discoveries:

Violence Against Police Triggers Race-Specific Reactions,” by Caity Curry. New research in American Journal of Sociology explores how local acts of violence against police influences discriminatory use of force by police after the fact.

Clippings:

Overeducated, Underemployed,” by Chelsea Carlson. Tressie McMillan Cottom talks to The Washington Post about why many African Americans are overeducated, yet underemployed. 

Sociological Strategies For a Successful Protest,” by Neeraj RajasekarVox draws on numerous sociological studies to suggest the best strategies for effecting change.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Well, we’re in for six more weeks of winter, which was probably the case for us Minnesotans anyways, so stay warm out there. This week we’ve got a new special feature on educational programs in prisons, summaries of research on commutations and a new form of residential segregation, and various reflections on how the Trump administration has and continues to negatively affect socially and economically marginalized groups.

TSP Specials:

The Return of Rehabilitation? Educational Programs for Prisoners Remain Inadequate,” by Michelle S. Phelps. New findings from the PIAAC study reveal that prisoners are reporting more participation in academic and vocational training, but the majority of them are unable to access any programs.

There’s Research on That!:

Misaligned Morality in Poverty Policy,” by Evan Stewart. Moral narratives about the “deserving poor” bias our thinking about people who experience poverty, and they have a big impact on our social safety net policies.

Pardons, Commutations, and the Distribution of Clemency,” by Ryan Larson and Veronica Horowitz. In light of Obama’s pardons and commutations upon leaving office, we round up research on who gets pardoned and who is more likely to do the pardoning.

Discoveries:

Minority Men doing ‘Women’s Work’,” by Allison Nobles. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that all groups of racial minority men are more likely than white men to work in female-dominated jobs.

Clippings:

White Americans Self-Segregate Amid Neighborhood Diversification,” by Caity CurryVox draws on numerous sociological studies in this piece outlining a new and different form of “white flight.”

PTSD in the Media,” by Edgar CamposArdath Whynackt talks to CBC Radio about the pitfalls of focusing on PTSD as the sole driver of violence among veterans.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Women’s March: Big Tents Require Both/And,” by Brittany Dernberger.

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello hello! We’ve had another big week here at TSP, and have lots of great things to share with you. To start, we welcomed another blog to our community pages, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Check out their blog for an extensive archive of engaging commentary and research related to genocide studies. And our amazing grad board is back for the semester, which means we are back in full force on the site. We’ve got great new pieces on Trump’s cabinet, women’s movements, environmental policy, and more. So let’s get to it!

The Editor’s Desk:

In case you missed it, we celebrated the 5th anniversary of TSP last Friday. Woot! On the Eds’ Desk this week, Doug and Chris celebrate and reflect on the past five years and preview what’s to come.

There’s Research on That!:

Divesting Diversity on the Presidential Cabinet,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. While social science shows that diversity is beneficial for business and organizations, the definition of “diversity” is often warped to avoid any real discussion of inequality.

When Women Mobilize,” by Jacqui Frost. A look at research on past women’s movements sheds light on the ways that gender shapes when and how women protest, and the important roles they have played in social movement history.

Barriers Keeping Women from STEM Careers,” by Amber Joy Powell. Research on race, gender, and education reveals why women remain hidden figures in STEM.

Discoveries:

To Enforce or Encourage Green Behavior?,” by Erik Kojola. New research in Sociological Spectrum finds that environmental regulations alone will not reduce public health and environmental hazards from chemical pollution.

Clippings:

How College Became Synonymous with Sex,” by Brooke Chambers. Soc Images’ Lisa Wade writes for Time Magazine and explains how colleges went from being rigid institutions to hubs for parties and casual sex.

Okay Google, Give Me the Facts,” by Edgar CamposThe Conversation talks to Thomas Maher about how to keep “fake news” from manipulating Google’s search algorithms.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Women’s March Was Only the Beginning,” by Dana R. Fisher.

The Day After: Women’s March on Washington,” by Philip N. Cohen.

Trump’s America Comes to Washington,” by Philip N. Cohen.

Scholars Strategy Network:

What Trump Means for the Affordable Care Act,” by Colleen Grogan and Sherry Glied.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Today marks the 5th anniversary of The Society Pages! We’ve been bringing you the latest in social science research for five years now, and we have learned a lot along the way. We hope you have too, and we want to thank you for your continued readership and support. We also welcomed a new community page to the fold this week, Engaging Sports, so be sure to check them out for all things sport and society.

It’s a new year, a new semester, and, later today, we will have a new president. So stay tuned in to TSP for when you need a fresh dose of sociology to keep you going.

Office Hours:

Stephen Ellingson on Religious Environmentalism,” with Caty Taborda-Whitt. In this episode, we talk with Ellingson about how activists overcome the barriers that have typically prevented religious organizations from investing in environmental causes.

Discoveries:

How Women Confront Sexism in Fantasy Sports,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Gender & Society finds that women who play fantasy sports often simultaneously resist and reproduce the gendered dynamics of the sporting world.

Clippings:

Lawyering Up for Low-Cost Daycare,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Germany’s push to universalize day care contrasts with the costly U.S. system.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Trump and the Neglect of the Working Class,” by Reeve Vanneman.

Scholars Strategy Network:

How U.S. Higher Education Promotes Inequality—And What Can Be Done To Broaden Access and Graduation,” by Suzanne Mettler.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! We are enjoying our last few days of winter break here in Minnesota, but we are excited to be back in full force for the spring semester next week. In this roundup, we have our last round of Best Of and Most Popular 2016 posts, and we highlight some new pieces on charitable giving, medical school, and repertoires of contention.

There’s Research on That!:

The Social Determinants of Charitable Giving,” by Caity Curry. The holidays are an annual “giving season” for many, but research shows that social factors often determine who gives and for what.

*~!MOST POPULAR 2016!~*
Millennials Misunderstood,” by Evan Stewart. In the most viewed TROT of 2016, social research helps explain why Millennials are at once fiercely independent, but also missing key markers of adulthood.

Clippings:

Teaching Medical Students To Rethink Race,” by Caty Taborda-WhittDorothy Roberts talks to Stat News about the need for medical students to learn about the social construction of race.

Discoveries:

*~!BEST OF 2016!~*
Fifty Shades of Pay,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Voted Best Title of 2016, this Discovery details a study from Sociology of Race and Ethnicity that finds wage inequalities between dark and light skinned immigrants.

*~!MOST POPULAR 2016!~*
On Noisy Neighbors,” by Evan Stewart. The most viewed Discovery of 2016 summarizes research from AJS that shows how class and culture determine what we find “noisy.”

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Revisiting the Rationing of Medical Degrees in the United States,” by Tania M. Jenkins and Shalini Reddy.

The Contemporary American University, In Seven Emails,” by Rebecca Schuman.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Disabled American Workers Need Ongoing Social Support As Well As Jobs and Fair Wages,” by Gwendolyn Barnhart.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and Happy New Year from TSP! We were out last week, so we have a lot of great stuff to share. We have some new pieces from around the site to highlight, and we continue recognizing our Best Of and Most Popular posts from 2016. Also, in case you missed it, the latest issue of Contexts is available for free online until Jan. 20! So grab a warm beverage and start your year off right with some sweet sociology.

Discoveries:

Fatalistic Suicide in a Tight-Knit Community,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Durkheim thought fatalistic suicide was the least common type, but new research in ASR finds it to be quite common in small communities.

Sex and Cardiovascular Risk in Old Age,” by Edgar Campos. A new study in JHSB explores the varied health risks and benefits of sexual activity and the ways they affect men and women differently.

TSP Specials:

*~!BEST OF 2016!~*
The Whitelash Against Diversity,” by Jennifer Lee. Voted best Special Feature by the TSP grad board, in this piece Jennifer Lee highlights research that helps explain the significant “whitelash” among white Americans that resulted in a Trump presidency.

There’s Research on That!:

*~!BEST OF 2016!~*
When ‘Nice Guys’ Rape,” by Amber Joy Powell. Feminist scholarship highlights the pervasiveness of rape culture and helps pinpoint how it reproduces notions that only “bad guys” commit “real rape.”

Clippings:

How Post-Election Questions Burden People of Color,” by Caty Taborda-Whitt. In a candid conversation with SlateTressie McMillan Cottom describes the emotional labor that these post-election interactions demand from people of color.

Life Expectancy and Inequality,” by Edgar CamposThe Huffington Post talks to Jarron Saint Onge about reports that life expectancy dropped in the United States for the first time in two decades.

*~!BEST OF 2016!~*
Crossing an “Empathy Bridge” to Understand Trump Supporters,” by Elizabeth Tremmel. Arlie Russell Hochschild talks with Wisconsin Public Radio about her research with conservatives in Louisiana.

*~!MOST POPULAR 2016!~*
The Noble Poverty in Kids’ Movies,” by Allison Nobles. In the most viewed Clipping of 2016, New York Magazine features research helmed by sociologist Jessi Streib on how Disney downplays social class.

Office Hours:

*~!BEST OF 2016!~*
Jooyoung Lee on Blowin’ Up: Rap Dreams in South Central,” with Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. Our Best Of 2016 podcast episode features a conversation with professor Jooyoung Lee about his research and his many skills – from ethnography to dance.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

How Passers-by and Policymakers View Beggars in American Communities,” by Shai Dromi.

Why Does Immigration Arouse Deep Feelings and Conflicts?” by John D. Skrentny.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Evidence is in: Progressive Policies Strengthen Families,” by Molly McNulty.

Contexts:

Fall 2016 Table of Contents

Darker Skin, Harsher Sentence,” by Lucia Lykke.

“Viewpoints on Financial Foreclosures.”

  1.  “Too Small to Help, Too Poor To Trust,” by Frederick F. Wherry, Kristin S. Seefeldt, and Anthony S. Alvarez.
  2. Can Ethnography Improve the Culture of Finance?” by Daniel Beunza.
  3. Financial Entertainment and the Public Sphere,” by Alex Preda.
  4. The End of the American Dream,” by Kevin Leicht.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Even though such things are socially constructed and culturally specific … Happy Holidays from TSP! We are officially done with the fall semester here in Minneapolis, but we still have some great new pieces for you this week. We are also kicking off our annual round of *Best of 2016* posts, and this week we highlight our Best Discovery of 2016. See below and stay tuned for more!

There’s Research on That!:

Oh By Golly, What is Poly?,” by Allison Nobles. The holidays are all the more difficult to navigate if you have more than one partner to consider, and we’ve rounded up some recent research that sheds light on the hows and whys of polyamory.

Discoveries:

The ‘Facebook Effect’ on Religiosity,” by Jacqui Frost. New research in Sociological Perspectives finds that young adults who use social media are more likely to be “syncretists” who pick and choose various beliefs and practices from multiple religions, rather than adhering strictly to one traditional doctrine.

*~!BEST OF 2016!~*
Extending the “Crime Scene” into the Community, by Ryan Larson. Voted the Best Discovery of 2016 by the TSP Grad Board, this piece summarizes recent research in Sociological Science that finds communities of color are more likely to experience stop and frisk activity after a violent crime.

Clippings:

The Persistence of Sexual Double Standards,” by Allison NoblesBroadly draws on research from Rachel Allison and Barbara Risman to explain how women are still more likely than men to be judged negatively for past sexual decisions.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Why Politically Active Billionaires Threaten the Health of Democracy,” by Darrell M. West.

Council on Contemporary Families:

3 Questions with Pallavi Banerjee: Immigration/Politics/Talk, by Eunice Owusu.

Contexts:

Rule Without Referees,” by Philip Vlahakis.

Sociology Teach-in on Trump at UC-Merced,” by Zulema Valdez.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! We hope you are staying warm and getting close to wrapping up your fall semesters. We have some great new pieces this week, including a new podcast episode with Vanesa Ribas and a new special feature by Penny Edgell. As we head into the break, in addition to posting new pieces every week as usual, we will be highlighting our “Best Of 2016” nominees from around the site, so keep an eye out for great stuff you may have missed throughout the year.

TSP Special Features:

Seeing the White in Christian America,” by Penny Edgell. In this new special feature, Edgell explains how race, over and above religion, drove white evangelicals to vote for Trump. She argues that blanket statements about “evangelicals” that ignore differences between white and non-white Christians can work to perpetuate a culture of white privilege that systematically denies that whites, too, have racial identities and interests.

Office Hours:

Vanesa Ribas on Immigration to the New South,” with Erik Kojola. In our most recent podcast, we talk with Ribas about her new book that examines race and labor dynamics in a meat packing plant in rural North Carolina.

There’s Research on That!:

Who (Dis)Trusts Science?,” by Caty Taborda-Whitt. Research shows that trust in science is much more closely linked to political and religious commitments than educational attainment.

Discoveries:

Stigma by Association: Adult Children and Parental Incarceration,” by Amber Joy Powell. Are adult children able to create a prosocial identity outside of their parents’ felony status? New research in Deviant Behavior says yes.

Clippings:

Supermarkets and Stratification,” by Caity Curry. The Rivard Report highlights research from Heather O’Connell, Jenifer Bratter, and Lester King that finds a “tri-racial system of social stratification” in terms of access to supermarkets in Houston, TX.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Harm Done by Media Coverage of Political Disputes about Public Health Measures,” Erika Fowler and Sarah Gollust.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: Remember the Ladies Men,” by Virginia Rutter.

Contexts:

Faculty Unions, Don’t Fold Your Winning Hand!” by Syed Ali.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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The fall semester is winding down, but we here at TSP are still working hard to bring you the latest in sociological research and writing. See below for this week’s new content, including pieces on the pitfalls of polling, the prevalence of academic gossip, and the decline of diners.

There’s Research on That!:

Polling, Sampling, and Social Conditioning,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Social scientists are all too aware of the problems and pitfalls that are inherent in polling and survey research. We highlight some common issues that may help explain why predictions for the 2016 election were so different from the results.

Religion, Politics, and Media in Africa and America,” by j. Siguru Wahutu and Evan Stewart. Comparisons between the two countries reveal similarities in the role of religion and politics in the media across the globe.

Discoveries:

Academic Gossip and its Unintended Consequences,” by Caty Taborda. New research finds that scientists use gossip to informally police one another and warn newcomers about untrustworthy colleagues.

Clippings:

The Diner Decline,” by Elizabeth Tremmel. The New York Times uses research by Ray Oldenburg to explain how we lose more than comfort food when we phase out diners in our neighborhoods.

Trump, the NRA, and the Mobilization of Fear,” by Chelsea Carlson. Scott Melzer talks to The Trace about how Trump and the NRA use the social movement strategy of fear mobilization to garner support.

Motherhood Penalty Costs More for High Earning Women,” by Allison NoblesBloomberg talks to Paula England about new research that shows how the motherhood penalty may be worse for women who make more money.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

How the Reproductive Justice Movement Benefits Latinas,” by Rocio Garcia.

Council on Contemporary Families:

From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend – What Unions Do for Women,” by Ruth Milkman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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