Friday Roundup

Whether you need a break from the post-Valentine’s Day candy sales or watching the Winter Olympics, we’ve got the goods! Check out our latest special feature on Jeremy Lin’s dreadlocks, social science research on gender and bodies, and new research on the role real estate agents play in racial segregation.

Special Feature:

Much Ado about a Hairdo? Unraveling the Social Significance of Jeremy Lin’s Dreadlocks,” by Stephen Cho Suh, Kyle Green, and Alex Manning. In light of NBA All-Star Weekend, starting tomorrow, Suh, Green, and Manning reflect on the significance of Jeremy Lin’s dreadlocks for sport, race, and culture.

There’s Research on That!:

Gender, Bodies, and the Valentine’s Day Script,” by Isabel Arriagada and Allison Nobles. To celebrate Valentine’s Day, we rounded up social science research on gender and bodies.

Discoveries:

How Real Estate Agents Perpetuate Racial Segregation,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in Sociological Forum finds that real estate agents use business practices that perpetuate structural racism.

Racism Disadvantages Third-Generation Immigrants,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in Sociology of Race & Ethnicity finds that economic and educational outcomes for third-generation Mexican-Americans are not better than second-generation Mexican-Americans, and are significantly worse than Whites.

Clippings:

The Economics of Genocide Prevention,” by Brooke ChambersThe Washington Post talks to Aliza Luft about economic strategies for genocide prevention.

Is Social Integration the Key to Happy Marriages?” by Allison Nobles. In a recent article in The New York TimesStephanie Coontz reviews social science research demonstrating that a flourishing social life can lead to a better marriage.

Learning from the Crime Drop,” by Chloe Hendrix.  In The New York Times, Patrick Sharkey discusses his research on both the causes and social benefits of the violent crime drop.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? Feeling the Love,” by Ryan Larson and Evan Stewart.

What’s That Fact? A Tricky Graph on Terror,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Paternal Incarceration and Children’s Schooling Contexts: Intersecting Inequalities of Educational Opportunity,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome sociology fans! If you’re also a fan of the Winter Olympics, we have sociological research on sporting mega-events and reflections on this year’s games. If you’re not a fan, we’ve also got sociological work on the meaning of racism, new research on engaging audiences on social media, and recent work on how police use big data.

There’s Research on That!:

Sporting Mega-Events and Urban Inequality,” by Caity Curry. In light of recent sporting events, like the Winter Olympics and the Super Bowl, we’ve round up research on mega-events and urban inequality.

Different Dimensions of Racism,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science reviews how racism goes beyond prejudicial attitudes and overt discrimination.

Discoveries:

Keeping Audiences Engaged on Social Media,” by Brooke Chambers. New research in the American Sociological Review finds that the key to successful messaging is switching back and forth between rational and emotional argument styles.

Zoom in and Enhance: Big Data meets Crime,” by Isabel Arriagada. Another study in the American Sociological Review examines how police’s use of big data has dramatically increased the number of people and institutions under surveillance.

Clippings:

Why Fines are a Flawed Solution to Mass Incarceration,” by Jasmine Syed. The New York Times talks to Alexes Harris about how fines and fees may not be the best alternative to incarceration.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Beyond Racial Binaries: How ‘White’ Latinos Can Experience Racism,” by Jonathan Harrison.

Contexts:

Can Hollywood Separate Gold from White?” by Matthew W. Hughey.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Noni Gaylord-Harden Reframes Violence and Youth,” by Eunice Owusu.

Social Studies MN:

Multiple Screens Are Not Always Bad For Attention,” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Well, it’s Groundhog Day, again. In case you need another reason to love this holiday, we rounded up social science research on why rituals are important. We’ve also got reflections on race and athlete protests, and new research on parenthood and gang membership.

Well, it’s Groundhog Day, again. In case you need another reason to love this holiday, we rounded up social science research on why rituals are important. We’ve also got reflections on race and athlete protests, and new research on parenthood and gang membership.

Well, it’s Groundhog Day, again. In case you need another reason to love this holiday, we rounded up social science research on why rituals are important. We’ve also got reflections on race and athlete protests, and new research on parenthood and gang membership.

(If you’re feeling confused, see here)

Special Feature:

Unsportsmanlike Conduct? Reflections on a Tumultuous NFL Season,” by Doug Hartmann, Kyle Green, and Alex Manning. In our latest feature, Hartmann, Green, and Manning reflect on sport, race, and athlete activism.

There’s Research on That!:

Groundhog Day and the Purpose of Strange Rituals,” by Allison Nobles and Jacqui Frost. Groundhog Day got us wondering about the purpose of strange rituals, so we compiled sociological perspectives on why rituals matter.

Missing Crime Data and Why We Need It,” by Caity Curry. After the FBI released the 2016 Uniform Crime Report missing key tables from previous years, we wanted to know how and why researchers utilize this data. Turns out, it’s pretty important.

Discoveries:

Does Parenthood Disrupt Gang Membership?” by Amber Joy Powell. New Research in Criminology finds that first-time parenthood reduces gang affiliation, but parenthood’s impact differs by gender.

Clippings:

Firearms and Mental Illness Matter More for Suicide than Mass Shootings,” by Evan Stewart. In an article for The Conversation, Miranda Lynne Baumann and Brent Teasdale explain that firearm access for people with mental illnesses is much more threatening to their own safety than to the safety of others.

Is Attraction about Evolution or Culture?” by Jean Marie DeOrnellasLisa Wade talks to The Washington Post about the cultural side of who we find attractive.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Selling the Sport Spectacle,” by Evan Stewart.

Children Learn Rules for Romance in Preschool,” by Allison Nobles.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got social science research on first-generation students and the crisis in higher education, new research on how anti-immigrant groups exaggerate immigration projections, and sociological perspectives on the civil rights case, Loving v. Virginia.

There’s Research on That!:

Push for Completion May Harm First-Generation Students,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. In response to University of Wisconsin-Superior’s recent decision to cut academic programs, we rounded up research to discuss how these decisions may affect first-generation students.

Discoveries:

Exaggerating Immigration on the Internet,” by Lucas Lynch. New research in Social Problems investigates how anti-immigrant groups manipulate immigration projections in the United States.

Clippings:

How Do We Talk about Sexual Violence?” by Allison NoblesVox talks to Heather Hlavka about the language we use to describe and define sexual violence.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Pod Panic & Social Problems,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Virginia is for Lovers,” by Gretchen Livingston, Peter Wallenstein, Angela Gonzales, and Christopher Bonastia.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Millennials, Gender, and a More Open Society,” by Barbara J. Risman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome sociology friends! This week we’re wrapping up our “Best of 2017” posts and ramping up for 2018! We’ve got new pieces on Trump’s tweets and racial injustice, screen capping news stories, and neighborhood segregation.

Discoveries:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

When Your In-Law is an Outlaw,” by Ryan Larson. New research in Criminology finds that previously convicted brothers-in-law increase the likelihood of crime for new husbands — regardless of their own criminal histories.

Clippings:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

How College Became Synonymous with Sex,” by Brooke ChambersLisa Wade writes for Time Magazine and explains how colleges went from being rigid institutions to hubs for parties and casual sex.

How Trump’s Tweets Distract from Racial Injustice,” by Lucas LynchABC News talked with Ben Carrington and Doug Hartmann about Trump’s tweets about athletes may reveal racial bias.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Screen Capping the News Shows Different Stories for Different Folks,” by Kyle Green.

Contexts:

Education Changes Neighborhood Segregation,” by Kelsey Drotning.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday Everyone! This week we’ve got some new pieces on parole revocations and Alabama’s special election, as well as revisits from 2017 on the immigration-crime paradox and gender gaps in tenure promotion.

There’s Research on That!:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

The Immigration-Crime Paradox,” by Ryan Larson. Research shows that even though immigrants and the areas they inhabit are associated with lower levels of crime, both documented and undocumented individuals are more likely to be incarcerated and receive longer prison sentences.

Discoveries:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

Biased Evaluations Contribute to Gender Gaps in Tenure Promotion,” by Amber Joy Powell. A new study in Social Forces explores why female academics have a harder time achieving tenure promotion than their male peers.

Clippings:

Violations of Parole Supervision Increase Prison Time,” by Caity CurryShawn Bushwayand David Harding talk to The Conversation about how violations of parole conditions appear to be a key driver of high prison populations, rather than new offenses.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

In Alabama’s Special Election, What about the Men?” by Mairead Eastin Moloney.

Contexts:

On Culture, Politics, and Poverty,” by Lawrence M. Eppard, Noam Chomsky, Mark R. Rank, and David Brady.

Pushes and Pulls for Professional Women,” by Mary DeStefano.

Self-fulfilling status?” by Shilpa Venkatraman.

Friends in Low Places,” by Shaun Genter.

Parents’ Faith brings Friendship,” by  Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Where the Millennials Will Take Us: A New Generation Wrestles with the Gender Structure,” by Barbara J. Risman.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome to our first roundup of 2018! We’re glad to have you. In addition to more “Best of 2017” posts, we’ve got new pieces for you on how children learn rules for romance in preschool, race in adoptive families, and reflections on the NFL protests throughout 2017.

The Editor’s Desk:

On the Eds’ Desk this week, Doug Hartmann reflects on the NFL National Anthem Protests in 2017 and how they might be remembered in the future.

Office Hours:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

Best of 2017: Mimi Schippers on Polyamory and Polyqueer Sexualities,” with Allison Nobles. In this episode we talked with Mimi Schippers about the ways our cultural disposition toward compulsory monogamy reproduces inequalities and limits the ways we can view relationships.

Discoveries:

Children Learn Rules for Romance in Preschool,” by Allison Nobles. New Research in Sociology of Education finds that children in preschool classrooms learn that heterosexual relationships are normal and that boys and girls have different roles to play in them.

Clippings:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*

Best of 2017: Gendering Gender-Neutral Occupations,” by Caity CurryThe Globe and Mail covered research from Laura Doering and Sarah Thébaud examining how gender-ambiguous occupations become gendered over time.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Small Books, Big Questions: Diversity in Children’s Literature,” by Evan Stewart.

Social Studies MN:

Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility,” by Allison J. Steinke.

Contexts:

It’s Better to be Angry Together,” by Philip Cohen.

Hurricane Party,” by Rachel Tolbert Kimbro.

Where Intersectionality is a Strategy,” by Eric Stone.

Facing Race in Adoptive Families,” by Chandra Reyna.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Looking to bring in the new year with some sociological perspective? We’ve got you covered. This week we’ve got some great new pieces and some of our best from over the year.

Office Hours:

*~* Best of 2017 *~*
Lisa Wade on American Hookup: The New Culture of Sex on Campus,” with Amber Joy Powell and Allison Nobles. Voted best podcast of 2017 by the TSP board, in this episode we talked with Wade about the complexities involved in navigating the ‘hookup culture’ found on college campuses.

Discoveries:

Shining a Light on Lower Crime in Brazil,” by Caity Curry. New research in the Journal of Quantitative Criminology finds that electricity policies in areas that previously had little to no access to electricity can be an essential tool for crime control.

*~* Best of 2017 *~*
Minority Men doing ‘Women’s Work’,” by Allison Nobles. Research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that all groups of racial minority men are more likely than white men to work in female-dominated jobs.

Clippings:

Promoting Women Reduces Sexual Harassment,” by Natalie Alteri. Frank Dobbin and Alexandra Kalev tell the Harvard Business Review that more women in leadership roles is vital to remedying sexual harassment culture in the workplace.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Listen Up! Great Social Science Podcasts,” by Evan Stewart.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Looking for some reading material for your winter break? You’ve come to the right place. We’ve got some great new pieces this week, as well as a new issue from Contexts and a brand new TSP volume, Give Methods a Chance. We’ll also be rolling out our *Best of 2017* over the next few weeks, so you can catch up on all the great posts from the year. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

Navigating Multiracial Identities,” by Allison Nobles and Amber Joy Powell. The latest royal wedding announcement got us thinking about the complexities of being multiracial in an increasingly diverse global world.

*~* Best of 2017 *~*
Revisiting Rape Culture as Survivors Say ‘Me Too’,” by Amber Joy Powell. In the midst of over 500,000 women and men saying #MeToo, we highlighted research on the causes and consequences of rape culture in the United States.

Discoveries:

Showing Off Your Sacred Side,” by Evan Stewart. New research in Sociological Science finds that Muslim women who have children aren’t necessarily more religious, but they are more likely to signal their religiosity to others in public.

Clippings:

Why Athletic Scandals Seem Standard in Higher Education,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. In a guest post for SalonRick Eckstein argues that problems with the NCAA are a symptom of larger problems with corporatizing higher education in the U.S.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Check out the Fall 2017 Table of Contents and see below for the first pieces to go online.

Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics,” by Rebecca Tiger.

Segregation in Social Networks on Facebook,” by Bas Hofstra, Rense Corten, Frank van Tubergen, and Nicole Ellison.

Closeted Womanhood,” by Ellie Malmrose.

Crime is Even Lower in Diverse Immigrant Neighborhoods,” by Hannah Kleman.

Social Studies MN:

Who Puts Politics on TV?” by Allison J. Steinke.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Welcome to another week at TSP! We’ve got some great work on LGBT parents, how parole officers define work for formerly incarcerated Black women, and how the Census categorizes multiracial individuals in the United States.

There’s Research on That!:

LGBT Parents Widen Definitions but Face Challenges,” by Caity Curry and Allison Nobles. We compiled social science research on how LGBT parents expand definitions of families, as well as legal challenges they face, and children’s outcomes.

Discoveries:

How Parole Officers Define Work for Black Women,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Gender & Society demonstrates how parole and probation officers limit what counts as “work” for formerly incarcerated Black women.

Clippings:

Cleaning Racial Identity in the U.S. Census,” by Lucas LynchThe Atlantic talked with Robyn Autry about the difficulty of categorizing racial identity for multiracial individuals in the United States.

Latinx Immigrants Perceive Discrimination Differently,” by Nahrissa Rush. NPR spoke to Emilio Parrado about why Latinx immigrants perceive less discrimination than those born in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

SocImages Classic—The Ugly Christmas Sweater: From Ironic Nostalgia to Festive Simulation,” by Kerri Scheer.

Contexts:

Helicopter Parents in the Hospital,” by Danielle Koonce.

Swedish Parents get the Interview,” by Lucia Lykke.

Fewer Kids, More Equality,” by Carrie Clarady.

Health, Now and Later,” by Justin Maietta.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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