Friday Roundup

Hello all! We were out last week for ASA and the like, but we’re back this week with new takes on genetic ancestry tests, gender gaps in tenure promotion, and the ways people rely on “lowbrow” culture to fit in. That and more below.

Discoveries:

Biased Evaluations Contribute to Gender Gaps in Tenure Promotion,” by Amber Joy Powell. A new study in Social Forces explores why female academics have a harder time achieving tenure promotion than their male peers.

Leaning on Lowbrow Culture,” by Evan Stewart. New research in ASR finds that people who feel they have high status, but also feel like that status may not be authentic, will reach for “more authentic” lowbrow culture.

Clippings:

White Supremacy, Not-So-White Ancestry,” by Neeraj RajasekarSTATNews covers research by Aaron Panofsky and Joan Donovan on how white nationalists understand their non-white ancestry.

Separate but Diverse?,” by Neeraj RajasekarDerek Hyra and Camille Z. Charles talk to Slate about “diversity segregation” and the ways that neighborhood segregation is changing but also staying the same.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

College Women: Seen as a ‘Slut’ if they Have Sex on a Hookup, ‘Bitch’ or ‘Prude’ if they Don’t,” by Michelle J. Cera, Jessie Ford, and Paula England.

Contexts Hall of Fame Award,” by the Editors.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Segregation by Sexuality in the United States,” by Braxton Jones.

The High Rate of Bereavement among African Americans,” by Megan Peterson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Before you head out to enjoy the last few weeks of summer, catch up on our latest pieces, including the history of “law and order” rhetoric, the motivating factor behind bicycle commuting, and why men are still avoiding “pink collar” occupations.

There’s Research on That!:

Political Protest and the Call for Law and Order,” by Amber Joy Powell. With Trump and the NRA’s recent calls for “law and order,” we look to historical social science that reveals how this strategy has worked in the past.

Discoveries:

Which Comes First: Bikers or Bike Paths?” by Jacqui Frost. New research in Social Forces finds that bike baths can induce biking, and vice versa, but there is a third important variable driving both — local environmentalism.

Clippings:

Why Men Continue to Avoid “Pink Collar” Jobs,” by Edgar CamposOfer Sharone and Janette S. Dill help Slate understand why women still dominate certain occupational sectors, even when male-dominated manual labor jobs are declining.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Changing the World, One Website at a Time,” by Mark R. Rank.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Social Ties and Poverty: An interview with Joan Maya Mazelis,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello! We’ve got some great new stuff for you this week, including a new special feature on listening to Latinx queers, a new Discovery about stalled school desegregation, and a look at marriage among trans men and women. Take a look!

TSP Special Features:

Learning from Pulse, Listening to Latinx Queers,” by Greggor Mattson. In our latest special feature, Mattson previews some of his new research on changes in gay bar culture and the ways that the Pulse nightclub shootings highlighted racial divisions and exclusions within the LGBTQ community.

Discoveries:

White Flight Stalls Desegregation in Schools,” by Caity Curry. New research in Social Forces finds that desegregation gains made in the formative years following Board v. Brown may have been superseded by a “post-desegregation status quo”.

Clippings:

Farmers Concerned About Healthcare Costs,” by Caity CurryShoshanah Inwood talks to Vermont Public Radio about serious concerns regarding healthcare among American farmers.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Does Marriage Matter? A Look at Married Trans Women and Men,” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday all! This week we’ve got sociological takes on the “glocalization” of soccer, trans admittance policies at women’s colleges, and Trump’s fluid masculinities. See all that and more below.

There’s Research on That!:

The “Glocalization” of Soccer in America,” by Edgar Campos. When the global and the local meet, aspects of a global game that many fans adore can be overshadowed by local flare.

Discoveries:

How Women’s Colleges Construct Gender,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society looks at the ways trans students are selectively admitted into women’s colleges.

Clippings:

How Businesses Benefit From Immigrant Exploitation,” by Edgar Campos. The Huffington Post looks to Tanya Golash-Boza to explain the “immigrant industrial complex” in the U.S.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Kids Today: New Data on Teens, Sex, and Contraceptive Use,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hey everyone! We’ve got some great new stuff for you this week, including pieces on bipartisan colorblindess and a proposal to credentialize panhandlers. And be sure to wish Lisa Wade and everyone over at Sociological Images a happy 10th anniversary. They helped pave the way for TSP and many others, so let’s all show them some love!

There’s Research on That!:

How Racial Minorities Are Excluded from Being ‘American’,” by Allison Nobles. The 4th of July celebrates the U.S. and its freedoms, but social science shows that racial and ethnic minorities are excluded from many of them.

Discoveries:

Bipartisan Colorblindness,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in The Sociological Quarterly reveals that both liberals and conservatives draw on colorblind rhetoric to contruct their moral identities.

Clippings:

Credentials for Panhandlers?,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Over at The ConversationBrendan O’Flaherty and Gwendolyn Dordick propose offering credentials for panhandlers instead of tightening restrictions on them.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Opioids, Health Care Denial, and a World of Pain,” by Megan Peterson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy July everyone! This week we’ve got new pieces on how moving affects adolescents, how gangs use social media, how marital status affects voting behavior, and much more. So grab yourself a summer drink and soak in some sociology.

There’s Research on That!:

Gangs on Social Media,” by Caity Curry. Social science shows that gang members use social media to promote their gang identity and gain notoriety, but the social organization of gangs determines their online behavior.

Discoveries:

How Moving Affects Adolescent Delinquency,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Social Forces finds that the more adolescents move, the more likely they are to engage in delinquent behavior.

Clippings:

Why Single Women are More Likely to Vote for Liberal Candidates,” by Neeraj RajasekarLeah RuppannerKelsy Kretschmer, and Christopher Stout explain how marital status influences voting habits in RawStory.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Religion: Greater Acceptance, Persisting Antipathy since Civil Rights Era,” by Jerry Park, Joshua Tom, and Brita Andercheck.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday all. This week we’ve got some great new pieces on the geography of punishment, the perennial disappointments of professional sports fans, and five viewpoints on whitewashing the working class.

There’s Research on That!:

How Geography Structures Punishment,” by Veronica Horowitz. Reflecting on the new public tool “Measures for Justice,” we look at the importance of geography in structuring disadvantage and procedural justice.

Discoveries:

Coping Strategies Among Undocumented Young Adults,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Social Problems finds that networking with peers of similar legal statuses may help empower young undocumented adults to develop positive coping strategies.

Clippings:

Everyday Racism in Canada,” by Neeraj RajasekarThe Miami Herald talks to Cheryl Teelucksingh about the resurgence of everyday racism in Canada.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Viewpoints: Whitewashing the Working Class

Photographs of the Mind,” by Mark Andres.

Success and Failure in Framing Social Movements,” by Danielle Koonce.

How Grown Siblings Divide Care Work,” by Carrie Clarady.

Long-term Job Insecurity is Depressing,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Marriage and the Genetic Risk of Depression,” by Justin Maietta.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: Yo! Is this the author of This Chair Rocks?,” by Molly McNulty.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy third day of summer everyone! This week we’ve got a new podcast interview with Michael Schudson and new sociological takes on violence against minority youth, veganism, and the bail industry. See all that and more below.

Office Hours:

Michael Schudson on The News Media,” with j. Siguru Wahutu. In our latest podcast episode, we talk with Schudson about the history of news, the legacy of Watergate, and how the public makes sense of news today.

There’s Research on That!:

Framing Violence against Minority Youth,” by Amber Joy Powell. Sociological research on youth victimization finds that minority youth are often excluded from the category of “true” or “ideal” victimhood, which ultimately works to legitimize their victimization.

Clippings:

The Cultural Contexts of Veganism,” by Neeraj RajasekarHarvard Magazine details Nina Gheihman’s research on the evolving meanings of and motivations for veganism.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Spring 2017 issue is here! See here for a look at what will be in the new issue and see below for a preview of the new content.

Desperation and Service in the Bail Industry,” by Joshua Page.

Measuring Race to Measure Inequality,” by Lucia Lykke.

In Defense of Alternative Facts,” by Kelly Beavan.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Millennials Changing Binaries (in more ways than one, of course),” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hey everyone! We were out last Friday, so we have a lot of great new stuff to share with you this week. We’ve got new sociological takes on the history of sex ed policy, the role of women in boxing, and the ways heterosexual couples negotiate whose career to prioritize. See all that and more below!

There’s Research on That!:

Pugilism and Power: The Stigma of Women in Boxing,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. A play about early boxing great Barbara Buttrick recently premiered in the U.K., and it has important implications for how we think about gender and sport.

Sex Ed and its Discontents,” by Allison Nobles. It’s still unclear how the Trump administration will handle sex education policy, but research on past policies reveals the ways sex ed is used to regulate sexuality, especially among black and Latino youth.

Discoveries:

Career Opportunities and Sacrifices among Heterosexual Couples,” by Edgar Campos. Despite perceived gains in gender equality at home and at work, new research in Gender & Society finds that many heterosexual couples continue to reproduce traditional gender roles in negotiating whose career to prioritize.

Disproving Stereotypes about Spending in Black Households,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. New research in Sociology of Race and Ethnicity finds that blacks spend far less than whites on “frivolous” items like new iPhones and more on the long-term costs of maintaining a household.

Clippings:

The Profits and Perils of Mug Shots in a Digital Age,” by Caity CurryThe Marshall Project talks to TSP alum Sarah Esther Lageson to explain the impacts of public mug shots on arrestees.

The Extremely Low Chance of Extremism,’ by Neeraj Rajasekar. Despite increased fears of terrorist acts, Charles Kurzman tells NPR that extremism is relatively rare.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Class Differences in Women’s Cohabitation in Early Adulthood,” by Mónica L. Caudillo, Paula England, and Eliza Brown.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Asian/Americans, Education, and Crime,” by Tasia Clemons.

CCF Gender and Millennials Online Symposium: Overview,” by Stephanie Coontz.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy June everyone! Before you head outside to enjoy the weather, see below or stop by for some interesting reads on conservative college students, the spiritual but not religious, e-sports in the major leagues, and more.

There’s Research on That!:

Conservative College Students as a Campus Minority?” by Cena Loffredo, Eleanor Miller, and Melody Goodin. This guest TROT by students at Oberlin College reviews research on conservatives in college.

Discoveries:

New Trends in Selective Spirituality,” by Evan Stewart. New research in Poetics reveals the boundary work that the “spiritual but not religious” do to develop their belief systems.

Clippings:

Intersectional Identities in Today’s Protest Environment,” by Jasmine Syed. The Washington Post talks to Dana Fisher about shifts in the demographic make-up of protests.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Gender Gap Reversal in Education, Moving toward More Gender Equality,” by Jan Van Bavel.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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