Friday Roundup

Hello hello! Friday the 13th got you looking over your shoulder? Don’t worry, sociology’s got your back. This week we’ve got new sociological takes on why we honor indigenous peoples’ day, how stereotypes discredit children’s testimonies, and problems with public perceptions of ‘sociological gobbledygook.’

There’s Research on That!:

Why We Honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day,” by Allison Nobles. Social science research helps us understand the underlying gender and racial components of colonial settlement in the United States.

‘Sociological Gobbledygook’ and Public Distrust of Social Science Experts,” by Isabel Arriagada. In light of Chief Justice John Roberts’ comments about “sociological gobbledygook,” we rounded up research on public distrust of social science.

Discoveries:

How Stereotypes Discredit Children’s Testimonies,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society finds that children of color confront cultural narratives that have the potential to produce unjust outcomes in the courtroom.

Clippings:

Linking Christian Nationalism and Intolerance,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas.  ThinkProgess talked to numerous sociologists about the ways Christian nationalism interacts with other ideologies.

Do Americans Care About Income Inequality?” by Nahrissa Rush. The Washington Post draws on a report from Leslie McCall and Jennifer A. Richeson that knowledge of inequality leads many Americans to develop skepticism about economic opportunity.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Representing Race in Fashion Media,” by Alyssa Scull.

A Bipartisan Pay Gap in Presidential Administrations,” by Evan Stewart.

Bias and Opportunity for Immigrants in the Legal Profession,” by Alisha Kirchoff and Vitor Martins Dias.

Contexts:

When the U.S. Sneezes, Puerto Rico Already has a Cold,” by Fernando I. Rivera and Elizabeth Aranda.

Seven Things Social Science Tells Us About Natural Disasters,” by Hannah Cash, Kelsey Drotning, and Paige Miller.

Social Studies MN:

The Political Divide Between Immigrants and Refugees,” by Lucas Lynch.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Families and DACA,” by Luilly Gonzalez.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday all. This week we’ve got new pieces on the varied meanings of nostalgia, the problems with media discourse surrounding mass shootings, and new data on racial biases in policing.

There’s Research on That!:

Mass Shootings and the Media,” by Amber Joy Powell. In light of yet another horrifying mass shooting, we look to research on how social contexts influence how the media frames these violent events.

Nostalgia Is Not What It Used to Be,” by Yagmur Karakaya and Jacqui Frost. Rapid technological changes have many looking to the past, and while social science research on nostalgia warns against idealizing the past, it also points to varied uses and meanings of nostalgia over time.

Clippings:

Preserving the Purpose of NFL Protests,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellasRashawn Ray and Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve remind us that the NFL protests stem from racial biases in policing.

When Think Tanks Tank Research,” by Evan StewartNPR talks to Thomas Medvetz about partisan interests and organizational conflict in think tanks.

Sociological Images

Thoughts, Prayers, and Political Skeptics,” by Evan Stewart

Contexts:

Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter,” by Rory Kramer, Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles.

And a Few from our Community Pages:

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Welcome back to another sociology-packed TSP roundup! This week we’ve got new pieces on the history of race and reproductive control, the addictive qualities of hate, and the dangers of rescinding DACA.

There’s Research on That!:

Violence and Discrimination against Transgender People,” by Caity Curry and Amber Joy Powell. Social science shows that personal prejudice and institutional discrimination continue to affect the lives of those in the trans community.

Race and Reproductive Control,” by Allison Nobles and Amber Joy Powell. Sociological research traces the historical links between reproductive control, race, and gender.

Discoveries:

How Hate Hangs On,” by Evan Stewart. New research in American Sociological Review finds that people can get “addicted to hate,” making it more difficult to leave hate groups.

Clippings:

Policing in an Era of Surveillance,” by Natalie Alteri. CNN Tech talks to Sarah Brayne about the social side of surveillance technologies.

The Dangers of Rescinding DACA,” by Caity Curry. In a recent piece for The Globe PostStephanie Canizales outlines what the abolishment of DACA could mean for immigrant worker rights.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Summer 2017 issue’s Table of Contents is ready to peruse! See below for one of the first features available online.

The Closet,” by Amin Ghaziani.

Social Studies MN:

Heading Home After Hurricanes,” by Sarah Catherine Billups.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Looking for sociological perspective on the latest news? Look no further. This week we’ve got a fact sheet on unmarried and single Americans, reflections on the violence in Myanmar, and highlights from recent research on income inequality in college and beyond.

There’s Research on That!:

Propaganda and Atrocity in Myanmar,” by Brooke Chambers. Research reveals the varied ways that propaganda enables the acceptance of atrocities.

Asserting Masculinity Through Sports,” by Amber Joy Powell. The recent Mayweather v.s. McGregor boxing match got us thinking about the ways race, masculinity, and sexuality collide in sports culture.

Discoveries:

College Classes and Class Inequality,” by Jacqui Frost. New research in Social Forces finds that the major you choose has a lot to do with the kind of funding you get.

Clippings:

The Stigma of Being Rich,” by Brooke ChambersRachel Sherman explains why rich New Yorkers attempt to hide their wealth in The New York Times.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Reminder: Marriage is No Longer the Mode,” by Bella DePaulo.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Whale, hello there! We’ve got some great stuff for you this week, including research on using punk rock to resist Islamophobia, a history of marijuana’s moral entrepreneurs, and reflections on the status of Title IX. Interested? Keep reading!

There’s Research on That!:

Backtracking on Title IX?” by Evan Stewart. Social science reveals the institutional and cultural forces shaping sexual harassment and gender discrimination policies on campus.

How Teacher Perceptions Shape Student Experiences,” by Amber Joy Powell.  Sociological studies provide insight into how teacher and school administrator perceptions and disciplinary actions often stem from race, class, and gender stereotypes.

Discoveries:

Talking Taqwacore: Punk Rock and Resisting Islamophobia,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in Sociology of Race & Ethnicity describes how an emerging genre of punk is forming a panethnic “brown” identity that empowers marginalized youth.

Clippings:

Gendering Gender-Neutral Occupations,” by Caity Curry. A recent article in The Globe and Mail covers research from Laura Doering and Sarah Thébaud examining how gender-ambiguous occupations become gendered over time.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Viewpoints: Title IX at XLV

  1. Women Want to Coach, by Nicole LaVoi.
  2. Title IX at 45, by Cheryl Cooky.
  3. Where All Kids Can Compete, by Erin Buzuvis.
  4. Union Busting and the Title IX Straw Man, by Ellen J. Staurowsky.

Marijuana’s Moral Entrepreneurs, Then and Now,” by Mike Vuolo, Joy Kadowaki, and Brian C. Kelly.

The Politics of Trans Identities,” by Iván Szelény and a response from Rogers Brubaker.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello all! We’ve got a great line up to kick off the fall semester, with a few thoughts from co-editor Doug Hartmann on the importance of teaching sociology, a second symposium on Charlottesville over at Contexts with a pice from co-editor Chris Uggen, and some great new pieces on law-breaking in-laws, improving children’s books about disasters, and the importance of DACA.

Editors’ Desk:

First Day Note, 2017-2018,” by Doug Hartmann. Doug offers a few inspiring words to kick of the fall semester.

“I see sociology as a noble profession, vocation, a calling in the Weberian sense. And in this time of tumult, conflict, and change, I believe our work—our research, our ideas, and the information and insights we produce—is more needed than ever by people, in communities, all over the world.”

Discoveries:

When Your In-Law is an Outlaw,” by Ryan Larson. New research in Criminology finds that previously convicted brothers-in-law increase the likelihood of crime for new husbands — regardless of their own criminal histories.

Clippings:

Understanding the Post-Festival Blues” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Vice’s Noisey talks to Rob Gardner about music festivals, crowd dynamics, and collective effervescence.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Context Symposium: After Charlottesville, Part Two.”

  1. “Setting the Record Straight on Confederate Statues,” Wanda Rushing
  2. “Defining Disorder Down,” Chris Uggen
  3. “The ‘Many Sides’ Implicated in Charlottesville,” Dawn M. Dow
  4. “Charlottesville Yields Few Sociological Surprises,” David Brunsma
  5. “Charlottesville and Our Racial Fault Lines,” Rodney D. Coates
  6. “What Are Our Universities’ Obligations?” James M. (JT) Thomas

Staking Post-racialism in Charlottesville,” by Milton Vickerman.

D is for Disaster,” by Kathryn Wells and Timothy J. Haney.

The Importance of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Policy,” by Hyein Lee and Margaret Chin.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Women’s Equality Day Turns 44,” by Nika Fate-Dixon and Stephanie Coontz.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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As summer break comes to an end, the TSP crew is gearing up for another engaging semester of sociologizing. In addition to checking out our new stuff below, those of you prepping to teach classes should be sure to stop by our Teaching TSP blog for class exercises, teaching tips, and suggestions for turning TSP blogs into assignments.

Editors’ Desk:

Long-form Journalism, 2017 Late Summer Highlights,” by Doug Hartmann. As we head into the new school year, Doug reflects on some great sociological journalism produced over the summer.

Discoveries:

The Politics of Dumpster Diving,” by Erik Kojola. New research in Sociological Perspectives details the ways freegans are pushing back against stigmatization and developing a collective identity.

Clippings:

Socially Sanctioning Venezuela,” by Neeraj RajasekarDavid Smilde explains why economic sanctions might bolster the social influence of President Maduro in The News Observer.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

After Charlottesville: A Contexts Symposium.”

  1. “‘Hilando Fino’: American Racism After Charlottesville,” Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
  2. “The Souls of White Folk in Charlottesville and Beyond,” Matthew W. Hughey
  3. “The Persistence of White Nationalism in America,” Joe Feagin
  4. “A Sociologist’s Note to the Political Elite,” Victor Ray
  5. “Are Public Sociology and Scholar-Activism Really at Odds?” Kimberly Kay Hoang
  6. “Sociology as a Discipline and an Obligation,” David G. Embrick and Chriss Sneed

Social Pressure to Appear Masculine Leads Straight Men to Have Unwanted Sex,” by Michelle J. Cera, Jessie Ford, and and Paula England.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday all! This week we’ve got a new feature on the sociology of joy and some new regular features on grandparental wealth and emboldened “fringe” ideologies. See below or stop by the site for more.

Special Feature:

A Sociology of Joy,” by Dan Brook. In our latest feature, Dr. Brook explores the possibility of a “serendipitous sociology” that properly situates happiness in social contexts.

Discoveries:

Inheriting Academic Success: Grandparental Wealth and Student GPAs,” by Brooke Chambers. New research in American Sociological Review finds that, when compared, parents and grandparents wealth had almost equal effects on student success.

Clippings:

Emboldening “Fringe” Ideologies,” by Neeraj RajasekarTina Fetner and Sarah Sobieraj talk to the New York Times about how quickly “fringe” ideologies can find their way into mainstream culture.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

What Does Studying College Sex Tell Us About Immigrant Assimilation?” by Kristine Wang, Jessie Ford, and Paula England.

The [Un]surprising Alt-right,” by Robert Futrell and Pete Simi.

Council on Contemporary Families:

For African Americans, Grief and Loss Starting as Children,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello all! We were out last week for ASA and the like, but we’re back this week with new takes on genetic ancestry tests, gender gaps in tenure promotion, and the ways people rely on “lowbrow” culture to fit in. That and more below.

Discoveries:

Biased Evaluations Contribute to Gender Gaps in Tenure Promotion,” by Amber Joy Powell. A new study in Social Forces explores why female academics have a harder time achieving tenure promotion than their male peers.

Leaning on Lowbrow Culture,” by Evan Stewart. New research in ASR finds that people who feel they have high status, but also feel like that status may not be authentic, will reach for “more authentic” lowbrow culture.

Clippings:

White Supremacy, Not-So-White Ancestry,” by Neeraj RajasekarSTATNews covers research by Aaron Panofsky and Joan Donovan on how white nationalists understand their non-white ancestry.

Separate but Diverse?,” by Neeraj RajasekarDerek Hyra and Camille Z. Charles talk to Slate about “diversity segregation” and the ways that neighborhood segregation is changing but also staying the same.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

College Women: Seen as a ‘Slut’ if they Have Sex on a Hookup, ‘Bitch’ or ‘Prude’ if they Don’t,” by Michelle J. Cera, Jessie Ford, and Paula England.

Contexts Hall of Fame Award,” by the Editors.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Segregation by Sexuality in the United States,” by Braxton Jones.

The High Rate of Bereavement among African Americans,” by Megan Peterson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Before you head out to enjoy the last few weeks of summer, catch up on our latest pieces, including the history of “law and order” rhetoric, the motivating factor behind bicycle commuting, and why men are still avoiding “pink collar” occupations.

There’s Research on That!:

Political Protest and the Call for Law and Order,” by Amber Joy Powell. With Trump and the NRA’s recent calls for “law and order,” we look to historical social science that reveals how this strategy has worked in the past.

Discoveries:

Which Comes First: Bikers or Bike Paths?” by Jacqui Frost. New research in Social Forces finds that bike baths can induce biking, and vice versa, but there is a third important variable driving both — local environmentalism.

Clippings:

Why Men Continue to Avoid “Pink Collar” Jobs,” by Edgar CamposOfer Sharone and Janette S. Dill help Slate understand why women still dominate certain occupational sectors, even when male-dominated manual labor jobs are declining.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Changing the World, One Website at a Time,” by Mark R. Rank.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Social Ties and Poverty: An interview with Joan Maya Mazelis,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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