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Hello hello! We are slowly recovering from a great ASA in Seattle and bringing you some new pieces as well as highlighting some older, but still timely, posts and podcasts along the way.

Discoveries:

Reducing Recidivism after Armed Conflict,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research shows a link between combat and crime in Colombia.

There’s Research on That!:

Heading back to school? Check out some of our classic TROTs on education, including race in the classroomschool segregation, and advanced placement tests.

Office Hours:

Our podcast is coming back in full force this fall with producers Matt Gunther and Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. If you are looking for a 30-minute dose of sociology, come check out some of our past episodes and stay tuned for new ones throughout the semester. A few great recent episodes include:

Dalton Conley on the Use of Genomic Biology in Sociology

Sanyu Mojola on Love, Money, and HIV

Doug McAdam on American Racial Politics and Social Movements

Joanna Kempner on the Gender Politics of Migraine

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Reproductive Stigmas Faced by Low-Income Young Women in the Deep South,” by Janet M. Turan and Whitney D. Smith.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Welfare Reform at 20: How’s that Working?,” by Virginia Rutter.

Contexts:

Young, Relentless Feminism,” by Nicole Bedera.

Did Baby Boomers Opt Out or Lean In?” by Virginia Little.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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The Olympics, Broadway, and genomic biology, oh my! Sociology is everywhere these days, and we are here to report on it. We’ve got some great stuff for you this week, including a brand new Office Hours podcast with Dalton Conley, so be sure to stop by and stay up to date on all things sociological.

In other news, the TSP crew is heading to Seattle for the ASA meetings this weekend. Grad editor Evan Stewart will be live tweeting the panels and plenarys from the TSP Twitter, so for those who can’t make it and even those who can, you can follow us for updates and highlights.

See you in Seattle!

Office Hours:

Dalton Conley on the Use of Genomic Biology in Sociology,” with Caty Taborda-Whitt and Sarah Catherine Billups.

Discoveries:

Work-Family Policies Foiled by Masculinity Norms,” by Allison Nobles. New research finds that men who learn about supportive work-family policies are more likely to prefer progressive work-family arrangements, but only if they think other men share those preferences.

There’s Research on That!:

Poké Panic!,” by Evan Stewart. “Social science research gives us a more measured perspective on the good, the bad, and the Poké.”

Clippings:

Sociology on Broadway,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. An new Broadway play will tell the story of how sociologist Terje Rød-Larsen helped make the historic Oslo peace talks a reality.

The Reproduction of Racial Segregation Online,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Recent research shows how systemic racial inequality offline gets reproduced in similar ways online.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

How Weight-Based Discrimination Hurts Many Americans,” by Abigail C. Saguy.

Contexts:

Parental Parties,” by Brittany Dernberger.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Promoting Marriage among Single Mothers: An Ineffective Weapon in the War on Poverty,” by Kristi Williams.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! We have some great stuff for you this week, including thoughts on Trump’s latest “joke,” how to better promote diversity on college campuses, and the success (or lack thereof) of social media campaigns. See below or stop by the site to catch up on the latest.

Discoveries:

How Black Mothers Struggle to Navigate ‘Thug’ Imagery,” by Amber Joy Powell. “Black mothers of all economic backgrounds use stigma management to try and keep their sons safe, whether it be teaching them to manage their environment, their experiences, or their emotions.”

The Consequences of Costless ‘Likes’,” by Jacqui Frost. New research finds that “liking” a cause on social media is not likely to lead to a donation.

There’s Research on That!:

The Wax and Wane of Body Hair Removal,” by Allison Nobles. To shave or not to shave? Research shows that trends in body hair removal may be shifting, but certain choices continue to be stigmatized.

Clippings:

The Feminization of Bank Robberies,” by Kat Albrecht. Sociologists reflect on the causes of a recent uptick in the number of females committing bank robberies.

Combating CyberCreeps,” by Allison Nobles. Women are starting to speak out about their experiences of harassment on online dating sites and coming up with strategies to curb harassment in the future.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

How the Ways College Authorities Talk about Diversity Can Undercut Efforts To Fight Racial Inequality,” by Natasha Warikoo.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Date’s Not Dead,” by Arielle Kuperberg and Joseph E. Padgett.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello again everyone! The TSP crew is gearing up for another year and looking forward to bringing you all the best in sociological writing and research during what it sure to be a roller coaster ride of an election year. Starting this week, we are resuming our weekly roundups to keep you up to date on what is going on around the site. We have a lot to share with you this week, including some pieces from a new issue of Contexts, thoughts from editor Doug Hartmann on the new era of athlete advocacy, and numerous angles on all things election.

The Editors’ Desk:

A New Era of Athlete Awareness and Advocacy,” by Doug Hartmann. “Let there be no doubt: we live in a new era of athlete awareness and advocacy, unlike anything we’ve seen since the late 1960s.”

There’s Research on That!:

How Institutions Trump Personal Politics,” by Evan Stewart. Sociological research sheds light on how it is that Trump won the Republican party nomination without majority support from Republican leaders.

Discoveries:

Is Lead-Laced Blood Thicker than Lead-Laced Water?” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research finds that the racial gap in childhood blood lead levels rises in wealthy neighborhoods.

Promiscuous Papas,” by Caty Taborda-Whitt. A study of 37 countries reveals that the gender of a father’s firstborn child has a significant influence on that father’s likelihood of being sexually promiscuous later in life.

Clippings:

Politicians Talk about Muslims,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Inflammatory rhetoric surrounding Islam in America can be found on both sides of the political spectrum.

Whitewashed Affirmative Action,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Despite increased litigation by white women against affirmative action, white women are among affirmative action’s primary beneficiaries.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

As Joel Best points out in his new Contexts piece, “Sociologists don’t just view the glass as half-empty, we mutter that it is probably leaking, too.” So, the new issue of Contexts asks sociologists to tell them some good news for a change. See below for a first look at what they came up with.

What Good News Looks Like,” by Joel Best.

An Economic Gap Slowly Closing,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

A Hand Up for Lower-Income Families,” by Sarah Halpern-Meekin, Laura Tach, Kathryn Edin, and Jennifer Sykes.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Donald Trump and the Dynamics of American Public Opinion about Racial Profiling,” by Deborah Schildkraut.

Why Does Immigration Arouse Deep Feelings and Conflicts?” by John D. Skrentny.

What Does The Supreme Court’s Deadlocked Decision on Deferring Deportations Mean for Immigrant Families?” by Heide Castañeda.

How Catholic Hospitals Restrict Reproductive Health Services,” by Debra Stulberg and Lori Freedman.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Taking the Nostalgia of Trump Supporters Seriously,” by Stephanie Coontz.

Social Policies, Parenthood, and Happiness in 22 Countries,” by Jennifer Glass, Robin Simon, and Matthew Anderson.

What’s really ‘for the family’,” by Virginia Rutter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello, everyone, and happy summer! Things have been heating up at TSP headquarters, and we’re back with a look at the latest in social science research. Our team is also gearing up for ASA 2016 next month, and we hope to see many of you there!

Discoveries

Faith in Fellow Citizens” by Evan Stewart. New research from Daniel Olson and Miao Li finds the relationship between religiosity and trust across nations isn’t quite what we would expect.

White Papers

Striking Goals for Pay and Prize Parity in Sport” Equal pay for equal play? Cheryl Cooky reviews the research on gender inequality in professional sports.

Clippings

Counseling Callbacks Skewed by Race, Class, and Gender” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Heather Kugelmass talks to The Atlantic about inequality in therapy.

Swipe Right for Sociology” by Kat Albrecht. Jessica Carbino talks Tinder and the sociology behind the swipes for Los Angeles Magazine.

The ‘Model Minority’ Is a Harmful Stereotype, Too” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Adia Harvey Wingfield explains how excellence can isolate in The Atlantic.

There’s Research on That!

Affirmative Action, College Admissions, and the Debunked ‘Mismatch’ Hypothesis” by Neeraj Rajasekar. In light of the Supreme Court’s decision in Fisher v. University of Texas-Austin, research shows Affirmative Action helps, not hurts, racial minority groups.

The Point of Unicorns” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Remember that prehistoric “Siberian Unicorn” discovered earlier this year? While archeologists comb the fossil record, sociologists are unpacking all our other paranormal beliefs.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network

How To Break America’s Logjam on Guns and Gun Violence by Philip J. Cook and Kristin Goss

Challenges and Opportunities for Efforts To Build Academic Ties Between the United States and Mexico by Beverly Barrett

How the Reproductive Justice Movement Benefits Latinas by Rocio Garcia

Why Regulation Is Necessary and Proper for a Well-Functioning Democracy and Market Economy by Michael Lipsky

Stabilization and Equity—Responses to Urban Fiscal Crisis In Flint, Michigan, and Beyond by Ashley E. Nickels

Why the Time Is Right To Expand the National School Lunch Program To Higher Education by Sara Goldrick-Rab, Katharine Broton, and Emily Brunjes Colo

Why There Are No Quick Economic Fixes for Women in Developing Countries by Barbara J. Risman and William J. Scarborough

Contexts

Letta Page and Syed Ali review Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari and Eric Klinenberg

Sarah Halpern-Meekin, Laura Tach, Kathryn Edin, and Jennifer Sykes explain how the Earned Income Tax Credit is a hand up for lower-income families

Paula England and Eliza Brown ask who has how many sexual partners and whether those patterns vary by sexual orientation

Council on Contemporary Families

A Reversal in Predictors of Sexual Frequency and Satisfaction in Marriage” by Sharon Sassler

‘Daddy’s Home!’ Increasing Men’s use of Paternity Leave” by Ankita Patnaik

New Work: How the Childfree Decide” by Braxton Jones

What Helps Women Entrepreneurs Flourish?” by Sarah Thébaud

And a Few From the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday everyone! We here at TSP HQ are wrapping up another great semester with research on binge drinking, collective mourning, and ex-felon employment. While we will remain hard at work bringing you all the best in sociological research over the summer, we are going to scale back our Roundups to once a month until September. So, you won’t hear from us again until June but be sure to keep stopping by to check out what we are up to in the interim!

There’s Research on That!:

When Fans Cry: Why We Mourn the Loss of Celebrities” by Amber Joy Powell. “People mourn the death of celebrities who hold connections to emotional events; that is, people do not solely grieve the loss of that celebrity, but also the loss of the memories associated with that celebrity.”

Discoveries:

Binge Drinking on the Bubble,” by Ryan Larson. Peer pressure can create a potent pull to binge drink, but only for those with a medium genetic propensity.

Clippings:

Ex-felon Employment,” by Ryan Larson. NPR talks to Devah Pager about how felons fare when they gain employment.

Give Methods a Chance:

Madison Van Oort on Discourse Analysis & Studying Commercials,” with Kyle Green. Kyle and Madison chat about their collaborative work on the ways commercials employ the crisis of masculinity to sell products.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Converging Gender Wage Gap, 1980-2012,” by Craig Upright.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Why is Pay for Caregiving Work So Low?” by Paula England.

Scholars Strategy Network:

What We Know – And Need to Learn – About Progress Against Sex Discrimination in Education,” by Celene Reynolds.

And a Few From the Community Pages:

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It is officially spring here in Minneapolis, but the erratic weather has not rained out our research roundup! Be sure to stop by and check out our latest.

There’s Research on That!:

Spring Cleaning,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. On the sociological significance of dust and who is responsible for getting rid of it.

Rural, White Women Getting Sicker, Dying Quicker,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. How stress and timing of childbirth disproportionately affect poor white women.

Clippings:

Why Pay Inequality is So Stubborn,” by Allison Nobles. “Unfortunately, while a small number of women moving into top positions may help those below, when large numbers of women enter traditionally male-dominated fields, the results are not so rosy. Why? Women’s work simply isn’t valued as highly as men’s.”

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Microscopic Hair Comparison and the Sociology of Science,” by Simon A. Cole and Troy Duster.

Germany Avoids Going Gray,” by Carrie Clarady.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Way We Still Never Were,” by Stephanie Coontz. Be sure to check out Coontz’s substantially revised and updated edition of The Way We Never Were.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello, everyone, and happy NOT Tax Day! With a brief respite from the primary election news cycle this week, we at TSP have been rounding up research on everything from harm reduction to hookup culture. Enjoy!

The Editors’ Desk

Larry Jacobs’ Public Scholarship.” Chris Uggen highlights Jacobs as a model for research and media outreach.

There’s Research on That!:

“Bringing Harm Reduction to America’s Heroin Problem” by Austin Jenkins and Allison Nobles. Research shows how new approaches to drug treatment increase safety and lower stigma.

Clippings:

Corporate Diversity Won’t Solve Income Inequality” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Kevin Leicht explains why in an in The Atlantic.

Tall, Thin, and Raking It In” by Allison Nobles. Amy Blackstone talks to Broadly about pay gaps and personal appearance.

From our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Can Universities Maintain Diversity without Directly Considering Race in Admissions?” Mark C. Long investigates alternatives to affirmative action and finds a few hazards along the way.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Date’s Not Dead” by Arielle Kuperberg and Joseph E. Padgett. New research shows hookup culture is popular on college campuses, but so is more traditional dating. Tinder hasn’t trumped it all!

Contexts:

Shallow, Self-Absorbed, and Aggressively Competitive ‘Primates’.” Myra Marx Ferree talks ethnographic methods while reviewing Primates of Park Avenue. 

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! We’ve got a little bit of everything for you this week, from gender segregation in the workplace, to white evangelical Christians and their voting habits, to data activism and the Panama Papers. Enjoy!

There’s Research on That!:

Colorism and Divisions Among Black Women,” by Amber Joy Powell. How casting for the new Nina Simone biopic highlights the consequences of colorism.

Discoveries:

Trickle-Down Gender Parity?” by Allison Nobles. When women are employed in upper level positions, what happens to the women left near the bottom?

Clippings:

A-Ok-Cupid,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Sociologist Michael Rosenfeld dispels negative assumptions about online dating.

From our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Why America’s White Evangelical Christians Turn Out at High Rates in Midterm Elections,” by Lydia Bean.

Council on Contemporary Families:

How is Celebrity Intimate Partner Violence Covered? Race and Gender Patterns Abound,” by Molly McNulty.

Contexts:

Talking Happiness, Security, and Counterinsurgency with Laleh Khalili,” by Steven Thrasher.

The Paper Ceiling,” by Brittany Dernberger.

How to End Institutional Racism,” by the Contexts Grad Team.

The Unborn and the Undead.” Viewpoints by Susan Markens, Katrina Kimport, Drew Halfmann, Kimala Price, and Deana A. Rohlinger.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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No foolin’ from us today, there is just a lot of great new content over on TSP this week! From family policy to freegans, we’ve got you covered.

The Editors’ Desk:

The Politics of Poverty Policy“. Doug Hartmann highlights new work from the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality.

There’s Research on That!:

The Social Ties of Terrorism” by Evan Stewart. In the face of recent tragedies, social science helps us make sense of the motives and methods behind terror.

Discoveries:

Freegan Foragers’ Moral Mission” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research from Alex Barnard digs into dumpster diving.

Clippings:

The Noble Poverty in Kids’ Movies” by Allison NoblesNew York Magazine features research on how Disney downplays social class.

Half of Americans Will Experience Poverty” by Neeraj RajasekarSalon follows up on this disturbing new social fact.

Criminalizing Black Schoolgirls” by Amber Joy Powell. New reports shed light on how schools disproportionately punish girls of color.

Give Methods a Chance:

This week Kyle Green talks to R. Tyson Smith about ethnography

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

Strict Voter Identification Laws Advantage Whites—And Skew American Democracy to the Right.” The title says it all, and new research from Zoltan Hajnal, Nazita Lajevardi, and Lindsay Nielson breaks it down.

Council on Contemporary Families:

3Q: Family Inequality with Philip Cohen” Quick questions, quick quips. “The culture wars over family politics always return to gender difference itself”

Contexts:

#callmecaitlyn and contemporary trans* visibility” by D’Lane Compton and Tristan Bridges. “The public celebration and recognition of transgender people is a start, but it has not yet been matched by achievements in gender equality and diversity.”

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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