Friday Roundup

Welcome back everyone. This week we’ve got new pieces on tax reform and inequality, whiteness on American television, and sexual harassment in sports media. See below for that and more from this week at TSP.

There’s Research on That!:

Why Tax Reform Matters for Inequality,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. The tax bill is still under discussion by Congress, so we rounded up research on how tax policy affects the structure of social inequality in America.

Discoveries:

Dance, Authenticity, and Multiculturalism,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in Sociology of Race and Ethnicity reveals the complexities of dancing as an expression of ethnic identity.

Clippings:

How Whiteness Shapes the Stories We See on TV,” by Jacqui Frost. The Washington Post talks to Darnell Hunt about the ways people of color are represented in the shows we watch.

Social Movement Pathways to Power,” by Lucas Lynch. In a recent New York Times piece, Kenneth T. Andrews argues that social movements can bring about change through exercising different types of power.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What Drives Conspiracy Theories?,” by Evan Stewart.

How Hate Hangs On,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Hope in the Sweatshops of Buenos Aires,” by Matías Dewey, Katherine Walker, and Sarah Pabst.

Get Tough on the Huddled Masses,” by Polina Zvavitch.

Of Porn and Prayer,” by Brittany Dernberger.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Women’s Sexual Lives May Not Be About What We Think: Pragmatism in Women’s Infidelity,” by Alicia Walker.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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The end of the year is getting closer, and we’ve been in a reflective mood at TSP this week. We’ve got some thoughts on the history of American individualism by editor Doug Hartmann over at The Editors’ Desk, a roundup of research on rapid attitudinal changes toward LGBTQ rights, and some historical examples of why it’s important to worry about normalizing white nationalism.

The Editors’ Desk:

Self-Reliance and the ‘Least of These’,” by Doug Hartmann. Reflecting on what he’s thankful for this season and what he’s hopeful for in the years to come, Doug talks Little House on the Prairie, American individualism, and being grateful for our communities.

There’s Research on That!:

Organizational Harassment and a Culture of Secrecy,” by Isabel Arriagada. Social science research explores the social dynamics of sexual harassment in the workplace and the conditions that prevent reporting.

Progress and Uncertainty for LGBTQ Communities,” by Allison Nobles and Caity Curry. Research on past shifts in attitudes towards same-sex relationships provide insight on what the future may hold for the LGBTQ community.

Discoveries:

Cracking Jokes and Dealing Drugs,” by Caity Curry. New research in Criminology finds that drug dealers often use wit as a way to mitigate the riskiness of their occupation.

Clippings:

How the Average Joe Helped Crime Control,” by Isabel Arriagada.  Patrick Sharkey and doctoral students Gerard Torrats-Espinoza and Delaram Takyar talk to the New York Times about how community groups are connected to lower crime rates.

What Makes Dad Do the Dishes?” by Natalie Alteri. Slate published an article by Jill Yavorsky who explains six major factors that contribute to a more equal sharing of household responsibilities.

How Dual-Earners Make it Work,” by Allison Nobles. The BBC talked to Phyllis Moen about balancing work and life in a dual-earner relationship.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Why We Worry About Normalizing White Nationalism,” by Evan Stewart.

When Social Class Chooses Your College Major,” by Jacqui Frost.

Council on Contemporary Families:

DACA Decision, ‘A very painful thing’,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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If you you’re avoiding Black Friday shopping, recovering from a big meal, or just need some sociology in your life, we have the gobbledy-goods! This week we have new research on beliefs about meritocracy in the United States and China, social science on the meanings of “white supremacy,” and reflections on the role of private schools for inequality in higher education.

There’s Research on That!:

What is ‘White Supremacy’?” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science helps us parse out different meanings of the phrase,”white supremacy.”

Discoveries:

Who Believes in Bootstraps?” by Lucas Lynch. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that Chinese are more likely than Americans to believe hard work is not the only key to success, despite both countries having long histories of meritocracy.

Clippings:

Will Private Schools Pay Up?” by Evan StewartThe New York Times talked with Charlie Eaton about how private schools play a part in inequality in higher education.

 

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Season’s Greetings from America’s Men,” by D’Lane R. Compton.

Silencing Sexual Harassment Complaints in Pakistan and the US,” by Fauzia Husain.

 

Social Studies MN:

Chatbots, Mobile Apps, and the Future of Journalism,” by Allison J. Steinke.

 

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: A Review of National Crime Victim Victimization Findings on Rape and Sexual Assault,” by  Jessica L. Wheeler.

Revisit: Women not enrolled in Four-Year Universities and Colleges Have Higher Risk of Sexual Assault,” by Jennifer Barber, Yasamin Kusunoki, and and Jamie Budnick.

 

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Welcome back! We’ve got a great roundup for you this week, with new research on the ways national conflicts shape beliefs about immigration, social science on the relationship between wealth and well-being, and some answers to the age-old question — pen or iPad?

There’s Research on That!:

Wealth and Well-Being,” by Allison Nobles. Social science shows that the GOP’s new tax plan risks widening already significant wealth and income gaps in the U.S.

Pen or iPad? Taking Notes in a Digital Age,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. Ever wondered whether taking notes by hand really makes a difference?

Discoveries:

Historical Conflict, Modern Xenophobia,” by Brooke Chambers. New research in Social Forces finds that nations with high levels of past territorial loss or conflict are more likely to base their national identity around a shared ethnicity, rather than shared citizenship.

Clippings:

Safe Spaces and Political Identities on Campus,” by Nahrissa Rush. Jeffrey Kidder discusses conservative criticisms of liberal “safe spaces” with the Washington Post and what these critiques illustrate about conservative identity.

‘Masculinity Threats’ and Mass Shootings,” by Nahrissa Rush. In a recent article for QuartzTristan Bridges and Tara Leigh Tober reflect on the ways American masculinity help explain the prevalence of mass shootings in the U.S.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

What’s Trending? A Rise in STDs,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Durkheim Lives!” by the Contexts’ Editors.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Millennials Changing Binaries (in more ways than one, of course),” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello and happy Friday! This week we’ve got new pieces on poverty penalties in the penal system, the benefits of DACA, and CrossFit bodies in a bodyless world. See below for that and other great new stuff from around the site this week.

There’s Research on That!:

Poverty Penalties in the U.S. Penal System,” by Isabel Arriagada. Research demonstrates the far-reaching consequences of the penal system’s money leveraging strategies.

Understanding Debates about DACA,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Research shows that repealing DACA will have adverse impacts on recipients’ health and well-being.

Discoveries:

Disability, Support, and Strain in Intimate Relationships,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas. New research in Journal of Health and Social Behavior finds that men and women navigate disability in intimate relationships differently.

Clippings:

Just How Violent is the United States?” by Caity Curry. The Washington Post talks to Kieran Healy about how rates of violence vary across social contexts.

Shifting Standards in Campus Sexual Assault Cases,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellasMiriam Gleckman-Krut and Nicole Bedera explain controversies over who gets to define campus rape in the New York Times.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Thank You, Angela Robinson: A Review Of Professor Marston and The Wonder Women,” by Mimi Schippers.

When Home is Where the Hazards Are,” by Evan Stewart.

Contexts:

Google Searches Show More Worry Over Gay Men and Boys than Over Gay Women and Girls,” by Emma Mishel and Mónica L. Caudillo.

Where Punishment and Pregnancy Meet,” by Megan Comfort.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Segregation by Sexuality in the United States,” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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It’s getting colder out there, which means it’s time to grab a warm beverage and snuggle up with some good sociology. You BYOB, and we’ll bring the sociology. This week we’ve got new sociological takes on rape culture in the United States, research on the ways gerrymandering disrupts democracy, and the history of how the census shaped Hispanic ethnicity.

There’s Research on That!:

Revisiting Rape Culture as Survivors Say ‘Me Too’,” by Amber Joy Powell. In the midst of over 500,000 women and men saying #MeToo, we round up research on the causes and consequences of rape culture in the United States.

Does Gerrymandering Disrupt American Democracy?” by Caity Curry. As we await a final decision on Gill v. Whitford, social scientists show how gerrymandering has real consequences for racial inequalities and representation in the United States.

The Global Nuances of Nationalism,” by Brooke Chambers. Sociological research helps explain how nationalism develops differently from one country to the next.

Discoveries:

In Modern Relationships, Equality Can Mean Many Things,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in American Journal of Sociology finds three different understandings of egalitarianism among European couples.

Clippings:

How the Census Shaped Hispanic Ethnicity,” by Isabel Arriagada. NPR’s Code Switch talks to Cristina Mora about the complicated history behind the term “Hispanic.”

The History of Racial Protest and Public Backlash in Sports,” by Lucas Lynch. The Guardian talks to our very own Doug Hartmann about what happens when sports and politics mix.

Sociology in Action: Encore Careers for Baby Boomers,” by Natalie Alteri. Phyllis Moen tells the Star Tribune about her new Advanced Careers Initiative to support boomers who are navigating retirement.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Why Witchcraft Appeals to Marginalized Groups,” by Allison Nobles and Jacqui Frost.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Women Who Cheat on Their Romantic Partners: An Interview with Alicia Walker,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday! As you gear up for Halloween weekend check out our most recent posts on the social science of genetic testing, how some groups become “white,” and the ways local differences shape women’s incarceration rates in Oklahoma.

There’s Research on That!:

How Grown-Up Careers are Like Middle School Dances” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Research shows gender segregation in work results both from self-selection and discriminatory workplace practices.

‘Whiteness’ in American Immigration Politics” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Sociological research reminds us that some “white” groups were once racial outsiders in the United States.

Discoveries:

The Social Side of Genetic Testing” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in the American Journal of Sociology finds that a variety of factors influence how scientists understand the relationship between genetics and disease.

Clippings:

Who Really Benefits from “Diversity” Policies?” by Neeraj RajasekarThe New Yorker draws on research by Ellen Berrey and Natasha Warikoo on the unintended consequences of promoting diversity.

How Local Differences Influence Incarceration Rates in Oklahoma” by Lucas LynchReveal talked to Susan Sharp about how county differences influence variation in incarceration rates and sentencing severity for women in Oklahoma.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

College pays…if you’re white” by Evan Stewart.

Monuments to the Racist “Heroes” of the North” by Abraham Gutman.

Social Studies MN:

The Color of Quality of Life in Nursing Homes” by  Sarah Catherine Billups.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Revisit: The Trouble with Averages” by Virginia Rutter.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello sociology-fans! This week we’ve got new pieces on why witchcraft appeals to marginalized groups, the changing role of race in college admissions, and how to explain the class gap in marriage.

There’s Research on That!:

Why Witchcraft Appeals to Marginalized Groups,” by Allison Nobles and Jacqui Frost. Social science shows us that witchcraft has a long history of empowering marginalized groups who question more traditional religious practices.

The Stakes and Styles of Christian National Identity,” by Evan Stewart. Trump’s reference to “attacks” on Judeo-Christian values got us thinking about the meaning of the term.

Discoveries:

Race for Admissions: Changing Affirmative Action,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in Sociological Science finds that less-selective colleges were more likely to stop using race as a factor in admissions.

Clippings:

How College Students Perform ‘Meaningless’ Hookups,” by Amber Joy Powell. NPR talked to Lisa Wade about the rules for college hookups.

Explaining the Class Gap in Marriage,” by Allison Nobles. The New York Times asked Sharon Sassler and Andrew Cherlin about the class gap in U.S. marriages.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

The Airport Ritual,” by Evan Stewart.

2 Broke Lab Rats: Human Research Subjects in Film and Television,” by Marci Cottingham.

Contexts:

Amazon Puts itself on the Market, But We’re the Ones for Sale,” by Zach Richer.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Parental Incarceration and the Transition to Adulthood,” by Tasia Clemons.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello hello! Friday the 13th got you looking over your shoulder? Don’t worry, sociology’s got your back. This week we’ve got new sociological takes on why we honor indigenous peoples’ day, how stereotypes discredit children’s testimonies, and problems with public perceptions of ‘sociological gobbledygook.’

There’s Research on That!:

Why We Honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day,” by Allison Nobles. Social science research helps us understand the underlying gender and racial components of colonial settlement in the United States.

‘Sociological Gobbledygook’ and Public Distrust of Social Science Experts,” by Isabel Arriagada. In light of Chief Justice John Roberts’ comments about “sociological gobbledygook,” we rounded up research on public distrust of social science.

Discoveries:

How Stereotypes Discredit Children’s Testimonies,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society finds that children of color confront cultural narratives that have the potential to produce unjust outcomes in the courtroom.

Clippings:

Linking Christian Nationalism and Intolerance,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellas.  ThinkProgess talked to numerous sociologists about the ways Christian nationalism interacts with other ideologies.

Do Americans Care About Income Inequality?” by Nahrissa Rush. The Washington Post draws on a report from Leslie McCall and Jennifer A. Richeson that knowledge of inequality leads many Americans to develop skepticism about economic opportunity.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Representing Race in Fashion Media,” by Alyssa Scull.

A Bipartisan Pay Gap in Presidential Administrations,” by Evan Stewart.

Bias and Opportunity for Immigrants in the Legal Profession,” by Alisha Kirchoff and Vitor Martins Dias.

Contexts:

When the U.S. Sneezes, Puerto Rico Already has a Cold,” by Fernando I. Rivera and Elizabeth Aranda.

Seven Things Social Science Tells Us About Natural Disasters,” by Hannah Cash, Kelsey Drotning, and Paige Miller.

Social Studies MN:

The Political Divide Between Immigrants and Refugees,” by Lucas Lynch.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Families and DACA,” by Luilly Gonzalez.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday all. This week we’ve got new pieces on the varied meanings of nostalgia, the problems with media discourse surrounding mass shootings, and new data on racial biases in policing.

There’s Research on That!:

Mass Shootings and the Media,” by Amber Joy Powell. In light of yet another horrifying mass shooting, we look to research on how social contexts influence how the media frames these violent events.

Nostalgia Is Not What It Used to Be,” by Yagmur Karakaya and Jacqui Frost. Rapid technological changes have many looking to the past, and while social science research on nostalgia warns against idealizing the past, it also points to varied uses and meanings of nostalgia over time.

Clippings:

Preserving the Purpose of NFL Protests,” by Jean Marie DeOrnellasRashawn Ray and Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve remind us that the NFL protests stem from racial biases in policing.

When Think Tanks Tank Research,” by Evan StewartNPR talks to Thomas Medvetz about partisan interests and organizational conflict in think tanks.

Sociological Images

Thoughts, Prayers, and Political Skeptics,” by Evan Stewart

Contexts:

Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter,” by Rory Kramer, Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles.

And a Few from our Community Pages:

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