Hello and happy Friday all. This week we’ve got a number of new pieces on religion, some reflections on how to influence public policy, and even a little sociology in outer space!

Office Hours:

Mimi Schippers on Polyamory and Polyqueer Sexualities,” with Allison Nobles. In this episode, we chat with Schippers about her new book and the ways “compulsory monogamy” limits how we experience relationships.

There’s Research on That!:

Do Politicians Listen When Constituents Call?,” by Erik Kojola. We round up research on the pros and cons of contacting legislators as a way to change social policy.

Outer Space and Earthly Inequalities,” by Jacqui Frost. It may require rocket science to get to space, but social science is beginning to weigh in on what it might mean for social life if we continue to commodify and colonize outer space.

Discoveries:

The Ordinary Side of Charismatic Leadership,” by Jacqui Frost. New research in Sociology of Religion finds that leaders of megachurches often embody a particular kind of charisma that blends the ordinary and the extraordinary.

Clippings:

How Sociology Can Contribute to Public Policy,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. The New York Times talks to a number of sociologists in this piece about the uneven distribution of economics and sociology in public policy discussions.

Sex Breaks and Employee Satisfaction in Sweden,” by Edgar CamposLotta Dellve talks to the New York Times about the potential of sex breaks to increase employee productivity and satisfaction.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Institutionalizing Prison Reentry,” by Brittany Dernberger.

Not Making Mom Proud,” by Nicole Bedera.

The Complex Path to Secular Identity,” by Rose Malinowski Weingartner.

Black Names Aren’t That Simple,” by Moriah Willow.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Opioids, Health Care Denial, and a World of Pain,” by Megan Peterson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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We may be on spring break, but we’ve still got a great line up for you this week. See below for new pieces on voter suppression, March Madness, and cultural appropriation at rugby matches.

There’s Research on That!:

How Voter Suppression Shapes Election Outcomes,” by Neeraj Rajasekar and Amber Joy Powell. Trump may believe that massive voter fraud swayed the 2016 election, but research shows that voter suppression is a much bigger problem than fraudulent voting.

Global Human Rights and the United Nations,” by Brooke Chambers. Despite its numerous shortcomings, research shows that the UN plays a crucial role in promoting human rights across the globe.

Discoveries:

Parents in Prison Hurts Children in the Classroom,” by Caity Curry. New research in Social Forces moves beyond boys’ bad behavior to investigate the negative cognitive impacts of parental incarceration on all children.

Clippings:

Appropriating African American Spirituals for Sporting Events,” by Edgar Campos. The New York Times talked to John M. Williams and other social scientists about the causes and consequences of the English Rugby team’s use of “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” at their events.

More Stress, Less Sex?,” by Neeraj RajasekarPepper Swartz offers the Washington Post some sociological reasons for why Americans are having less sex.

 From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

TANF Policy to Address Low, Volatile Income among Disadvantaged Families,” by Bradley Hardy.

Contexts:

Shame, Shame, Shame,” by Polina Zvavitch.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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We are heading into spring break up here in Minnesota, but TSP won’t be taking a break from bringing you all things sociology. This week we’ve got new pieces on crime fears, hate groups, and feminist book stores, among others. See below and see you next week!

There’s Research on That!:

Fear of Crime and Punitive Policies,” by Caity Curry and Ryan Larson. Despite crime rates dropping, fear of crime remains high. Social science helps explain why.

Not So “Über” Anymore?,” by Evan Stewart. Uber may be in the hot seat right now, but research shows that racial and gender discrimination is a common issue in new businesses.

How Discrimination Harms Your Health,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. The link between discrimination and stress is clear, and research shows that centrality and visibility of racial or sexual differences leads to higher rates of discrimination.

Discoveries:

Policing Mothers with Disabilities,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Gender & Society finds that mothers with disabilities are often disciplined by medical professionals because of their perceived risk.

Clippings:

How Hate Groups Mobilize Masculinity,” by Neeraj RajasekarThe Guardian interviewed Michael Kimmel about the ways hate groups validate the masculinity of their followers.

The Trump Presidency and the Rise of Political Activism,” by Caity CurryDana Fisher and Sara Sobieraj talk to NPR about the recent rise in political activism on both the left and the right.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

International Family Research for International Women’s Day,” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Transnational migrants, public housing, and the Oscars. We’ve got sociological takes on all that and more this week at TSP.

Office Hours:

Sergio Chávez on Border Lives and Transnationalism,” with Matt Gunther. In this episode, Dr. Chávez describes the incredible strain that border controls and bureaucracies place on low wage workers, but he also provides a remarkable account of the way that many workers leverage these difficulties into relationships and livelihood strategies.

There’s Research on That!:

The Problems with Public Housing,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau. With ongoing efforts to revitalize public housing projects in the U.S., we look to research on the social forces and sentiments driving their decline.

The Limited Efficacy of Domestic Violence Policies,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Research shows that domestic violence policies are often limited in how much they change the way perpetrators think of domestic violence, even if they sometimes keep abusers from repeating violent behavior.

Public Stories and Social Change,” by Allison Nobles. Stories can be powerful tools for establishing group identity and mobilizing people for a cause, but people in power are more likely to have their stories heard.

Discoveries:

High School Arrests Halt Higher Education,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Criminology finds that being arrested in high school severely limits pathways to higher education.

Clippings:

Trump’s Reason for Travel Ban Not Supported by Research,” by Edgar CamposCharles Kurzman tells the LA Times that his research has not identified a single death since the 9/11 attacks caused by people from the seven nations Trump put on his ban list.

The Ivy League of Gender Inequality,” by Brooke ChambersNew York Magazine details a new study by Dirk Witteveen and Paul Attewell that finds a gender pay gap among graduates of elite universities.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Raising the Visibility of Gender-Nonconformists: A Review of ‘Gender Revolution: A Journey with Kati Couric’,” by Barbara J. Risman.

Moonlight, Trayvon, the Oscars, and America’s Fear of Black Boys,” by Steven Thrasher.

Children of Immigrants, Changing Races,” by Saswathi Natta.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Time/Place/Race/Class and Family Changes,” by Braxton Jones.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello hello all! As usual, we have a great line up for you this week, so we will get right to it.

There’s Research on That!:

When Journalists Tweet,” by j. Siguru Wahutu. Social media in the newsroom is increasingly common, but it can blur the lines between professional and personal opinion.

The Role of Female Role Models,” by Jacqui Frost. Social science shows that positive female role models are a significant predictor of interest and success in STEM for women, and movie stars are not the only ones who can fill those roles.

Discoveries:

Police Brutality and Citizen Cynicism,” by Ryan Larson. New research in American Sociological Review finds a significant drop in 911 calls after an incident of police violence.

Clippings:

How Scary Video Games Build Social Bonds,” by Matthew Aguilar-Champeau.  Margee Kerr talks to The Observer about the camaraderie you can build by playing horror-themed video games with others.

‘Colorblind’ Economic Policies and Their Racial Repercussions,” by Caity CurryAdia Harvey Wingfield explains how seemingly neutral economic and criminal justice policies can work to maintain systems of racial inequality in The Atlantic.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

For African Americans, Grief and Loss Starting as Children,” with Debra Umberson.

Contexts:

Babes in Bikeland,” by Bjorn Christianson.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Happy Friday everyone! This week we’ve got timely pieces on private schooling, immigration policy, fearmongering, and more. So read on if you’re looking for a little sociological perspective.

There’s Research on That!:

School Choice and Social Inequality,” by Evan Stewart and Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science comparing private and public approaches to schooling finds distinct benefits of public schools and questions whether more choice in schooling really helps everyone.

The Culture of Mass Deportation,” by Caity Curry. On the history of American immigration policy and the increasingly punitive turn it’s taken.

Discoveries:

Uncertainty and Flexibility in Trans Health Care,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. New research in Journal of Health and Social Behavior investigates how doctors navigate trans care.

Clippings:

Nothing to Fear but Fearmongering Itself,” by Edgar CamposBarry Glassner talks to TIME about Trump’s unprecedented use of fearmongering as a political tactic.

Why We Don’t Need a White History Month,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Vox talks to Daniel Hirschman about how calls for a white history month ignore the already pervasive white privilege in U.S. society.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

“How Many Deaths? The High Rate of Bereavement among Black Americans,” by Megan Peterson.

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hey everyone! Lots of great new stuff this week, including a new Office Hours podcast. So let’s get to it!

Office Hours:

Natasha Warikoo on The Diversity Bargain,” with Neeraj Rajasekar. In this episode, we talk with Warikoo about her new book and the ways that elite students understand diversity and make sense of their social positions.

There’s Research on That!:

White Working Class Voters,” by Erik KojolaThe election of Donald Trump left many wondering why large numbers of working class whites voted for a candidate who supports policies that are likely to have a negative impact on them. You guessed it — there’s research on that. 

Gendering Intelligence,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. A recent study found that young girls are more likely to attribute “brilliance” to men. Research on gender stereotypes and socialization helps explain why.

Discoveries:

Violence Against Police Triggers Race-Specific Reactions,” by Caity Curry. New research in American Journal of Sociology explores how local acts of violence against police influences discriminatory use of force by police after the fact.

Clippings:

Overeducated, Underemployed,” by Chelsea Carlson. Tressie McMillan Cottom talks to The Washington Post about why many African Americans are overeducated, yet underemployed. 

Sociological Strategies For a Successful Protest,” by Neeraj RajasekarVox draws on numerous sociological studies to suggest the best strategies for effecting change.

From Our Partners:

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Well, we’re in for six more weeks of winter, which was probably the case for us Minnesotans anyways, so stay warm out there. This week we’ve got a new special feature on educational programs in prisons, summaries of research on commutations and a new form of residential segregation, and various reflections on how the Trump administration has and continues to negatively affect socially and economically marginalized groups.

TSP Specials:

The Return of Rehabilitation? Educational Programs for Prisoners Remain Inadequate,” by Michelle S. Phelps. New findings from the PIAAC study reveal that prisoners are reporting more participation in academic and vocational training, but the majority of them are unable to access any programs.

There’s Research on That!:

Misaligned Morality in Poverty Policy,” by Evan Stewart. Moral narratives about the “deserving poor” bias our thinking about people who experience poverty, and they have a big impact on our social safety net policies.

Pardons, Commutations, and the Distribution of Clemency,” by Ryan Larson and Veronica Horowitz. In light of Obama’s pardons and commutations upon leaving office, we round up research on who gets pardoned and who is more likely to do the pardoning.

Discoveries:

Minority Men doing ‘Women’s Work’,” by Allison Nobles. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that all groups of racial minority men are more likely than white men to work in female-dominated jobs.

Clippings:

White Americans Self-Segregate Amid Neighborhood Diversification,” by Caity CurryVox draws on numerous sociological studies in this piece outlining a new and different form of “white flight.”

PTSD in the Media,” by Edgar CamposArdath Whynackt talks to CBC Radio about the pitfalls of focusing on PTSD as the sole driver of violence among veterans.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Women’s March: Big Tents Require Both/And,” by Brittany Dernberger.

Scholars Strategy Network:

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Hello hello! We’ve had another big week here at TSP, and have lots of great things to share with you. To start, we welcomed another blog to our community pages, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Check out their blog for an extensive archive of engaging commentary and research related to genocide studies. And our amazing grad board is back for the semester, which means we are back in full force on the site. We’ve got great new pieces on Trump’s cabinet, women’s movements, environmental policy, and more. So let’s get to it!

The Editor’s Desk:

In case you missed it, we celebrated the 5th anniversary of TSP last Friday. Woot! On the Eds’ Desk this week, Doug and Chris celebrate and reflect on the past five years and preview what’s to come.

There’s Research on That!:

Divesting Diversity on the Presidential Cabinet,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. While social science shows that diversity is beneficial for business and organizations, the definition of “diversity” is often warped to avoid any real discussion of inequality.

When Women Mobilize,” by Jacqui Frost. A look at research on past women’s movements sheds light on the ways that gender shapes when and how women protest, and the important roles they have played in social movement history.

Barriers Keeping Women from STEM Careers,” by Amber Joy Powell. Research on race, gender, and education reveals why women remain hidden figures in STEM.

Discoveries:

To Enforce or Encourage Green Behavior?,” by Erik Kojola. New research in Sociological Spectrum finds that environmental regulations alone will not reduce public health and environmental hazards from chemical pollution.

Clippings:

How College Became Synonymous with Sex,” by Brooke Chambers. Soc Images’ Lisa Wade writes for Time Magazine and explains how colleges went from being rigid institutions to hubs for parties and casual sex.

Okay Google, Give Me the Facts,” by Edgar CamposThe Conversation talks to Thomas Maher about how to keep “fake news” from manipulating Google’s search algorithms.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

The Women’s March Was Only the Beginning,” by Dana R. Fisher.

The Day After: Women’s March on Washington,” by Philip N. Cohen.

Trump’s America Comes to Washington,” by Philip N. Cohen.

Scholars Strategy Network:

What Trump Means for the Affordable Care Act,” by Colleen Grogan and Sherry Glied.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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Today marks the 5th anniversary of The Society Pages! We’ve been bringing you the latest in social science research for five years now, and we have learned a lot along the way. We hope you have too, and we want to thank you for your continued readership and support. We also welcomed a new community page to the fold this week, Engaging Sports, so be sure to check them out for all things sport and society.

It’s a new year, a new semester, and, later today, we will have a new president. So stay tuned in to TSP for when you need a fresh dose of sociology to keep you going.

Office Hours:

Stephen Ellingson on Religious Environmentalism,” with Caty Taborda-Whitt. In this episode, we talk with Ellingson about how activists overcome the barriers that have typically prevented religious organizations from investing in environmental causes.

Discoveries:

How Women Confront Sexism in Fantasy Sports,” by Amber Joy Powell. New research in Gender & Society finds that women who play fantasy sports often simultaneously resist and reproduce the gendered dynamics of the sporting world.

Clippings:

Lawyering Up for Low-Cost Daycare,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Germany’s push to universalize day care contrasts with the costly U.S. system.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Trump and the Neglect of the Working Class,” by Reeve Vanneman.

Scholars Strategy Network:

How U.S. Higher Education Promotes Inequality—And What Can Be Done To Broaden Access and Graduation,” by Suzanne Mettler.

And a Few from the Community Pages:

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