TSP’s Weekly Roundup: Feb. 27, 2015

RU022715February may be a short month, but we’re never short on sociology to share.

Roundtables:

Is the (Tea) Party Over?” by Erik Kojola and Jack Delehanty. Scholars Meghan A. BurkeRuth BraunsteinAndrew Perrin, and Robert Horwitz weigh in on the past, present, and future of a young political movement.

The Editors’ Desk:

Oscar Winners Put Social Issues Center Stage.” A look at some accessible research on four big social issues raised in Academy Award speeches last weekend.

Contexts: New Issue, New Site,” by Doug Hartmann. New editors Philip Cohen and Syed Ali have put out their first issue and launched the revamped contexts.org, hosted by thesocietypages.org.

There’s Research on That!

Extra! Extra! Read All about It, All the Time!” by Sarah Catherine Billups. A look at media saturation with research from Sara Goldrick-RabLauren SchuddeJennie E. Brand, Fabian T. PfefferMatthew CurryYu XieMina DadgarMadeline J. TrimbleChristopher Jepsen, Kenneth Troske, and Paul Coomes.

Who—and How—Community College Helps,” by Anne Kaduk and Amy August. A sociological primer on Obama’s plan to make two years of community college free, with work from Kenneth T. AndrewsNeal CarenRachel BestArnout van de Rijt, Eran Shor, Charles Ward, Steven SkienaKarin Wahl-Jorgensen, and Stephen Ostertag.

Citings & Sightings:

Cheap Gas Has Pricey Consequences,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Guangqing Chi on the way pump prices change driving habits.

God and Good Citizens,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Penny Edgell on the perceived tie between religion and morality.

Orphaned by Incarceration,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. When Sesame Street adds a character with a parent behind bars, Christopher Wildeman, Sara Wakefield, Kristin Turney, and John Hagan talk to The Nation.

Happily Never After? The Challenges of ‘Marrying Up’,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Scholar Jessi Streib discusses how cross-class marriages aren’t as common as they seem in the movies, but they certainly can, and do, work out in the real world.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

Naomi Sugie on Using Smartphones for Research,” with Sarah Esther Lageson. Naomi Sugie tells GMAC, “Smartphones have their limitations, but they… can expand the realm of empirical investigation for researchers to consider questions and ideas we just weren’t able to think about before…”

Contexts Magazine:

The Winter 2015 issue is brimming with goodies! Some are available on contexts.org, but the full issue is out from behind its paywall for another three weeks at contexts.sagepub.com.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Equal Pay? Not Yet for Mothers,” by Shelley J. Correll.

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Promising Launch of Community-Oriented Charter Schools in New Orleans,” by Brian R. Beabout and Joseph L. Boselovic.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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Contexts: New Issue, New Site

Attention, friends-of-TSP, attention: Philip Cohen and Syed Ali have taken the reins at the ASA’s Contexts magazine, and their first issue—plus site redesign by Todd Van Arsdale and Jon Smajda—has hit the web!

Ali and Cohen have assembled an all-star team of authors and a truly engaging read, cover to cover and link to link. Among the highlights: a suite of articles on gun culture, including Jennifer Dawn Carlson’s feature “Carrying Guns, Contesting Gender” (free, in full, on the web) and Stephen Thrasher,Jean Beaman, and Todd Beer’s pieces on Ferguson; an interview between TSP-alum Hollie Nyseth Brehm and genocide survivor Keith Chhe; Erik Olin Wright‘s take on Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century; and a look at how lesbians can be the leaders in gentrification by Amin Ghaziani, author of There Goes the Gayborhood?

For the first four weeks after each issue of Contexts is published, its entirety is available for free (no paywall!) from SAGE, its publisher. Other selected content is available right on contexts.org. Have a look around. Our illustrious partners are off to a great start, and we couldn’t be happier to have them as part of the TSP family.

Oscar Winners Put Social Issues Center Stage

At last night’s Oscars, social issues were center stage. Below, four of the issues award winners touched on and some starting points for learning more:
  1. Equal Pay for Equal Work: The Council on Contemporary families offers aportfolio of research on 50 years since the Equal Pay Act, and we suggest checking out the pieces on how the wage gap narrows among high earners and how the wage gap is affected by race and ethnicity.
  2. Awareness of Diseases like ALS and Alzheimer’s: A 2012 American Sociological Review article by Rachel Kahn Best outlines how awareness campaigns bring more funding to medical research on some conditions, but add to the stigma associated with others.
  3. Voting Rights: The Scholars Strategy Network presents an overview of research on steps forward and back since the Voting Rights Act of 1963.
  4. Mass Incarceration: Sarah Shannon and Chris Uggen offer a starting point with their time-lapse visualizations of changes in American punishment, including the disproportionate incarceration of black men.

TSP’s Weekly Roundup: Feb. 20, 2015

RU022015This week on TheSocietyPages.org

Office Hours Podcast:

Hahrie Han on Organizing Political Activists,” with Evan Stewart. Dr. Han discusses her latest book and the shaping of political movements.

Teaching TSP:

Intro to Sociological Methods Using the Reading List,” by Amy August. An exercise—with worksheets—designed to help students learn methods by distilling academic journal articles.

The Reading List:

The KKK’s Living Legacy,” by Evan Stewart. New research from Rory McVeigh, David Cunningham, and Justin Farrell shows the Klan’s activities in the ’60s continue to affect today’s Southern politics.

Citings & Sightings:

Self-Segregation in San Francisco Schools,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Studies find school choice works through parents’ social networks to segregate schools.

Working for the Long Weekend,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Long weekends make a great treat, but one sociologist argues adopting the schedule full-time wouldn’t help work-life balance.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Does Public Education Improve When Urban Districts Manage a ‘Portfolio’ of Schools?” by Katrina Buckley.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Men against Women, or the Top 20 Percent against the Bottom 80?” by Leslie McCall.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s Weekly Roundup: Friday the 13th (of February, 2015)

RU021315Not at all spooky, but always “soc-y.”

There’s Research on That!

Justifying Our Love,” by Jacqui Frost. Americans love love, even when it hurts. How have love and culture mingled to create modern “love”? Frost brings research from Eva Illouz, Ann Swidler, Francesca Cancian, and Anthony Giddens.

Vexed by Vaccination Refusals,” by Caty Taborda. Research on distrust of science and vaccinations, as well as network ties that spread medical knowledge—and sometimes skew it along the way.

The Editors’ Desk:

The New Yorker: Champion of Serious Sociology,” by Doug Hartmann. Admiring the work of Kelefa Sanneh, Jill Lepore, and Adam Gopnik, who are all bringing sociology’s big ideas to the Big Apple.

Give Methods a Chance:

Amy Schalet on In-Depth Interviews,” with Kyle Green. A leading sociologist on the methodology behind a time-consuming, but very rewarding, research technique.

Citings & Sightings:

Books Behind Bars: College Courses in Prisons,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Using reading for rehabilitation.

Could Porn Lead to Sex Trafficking?” by Caty Taborda. One researcher argues a correlation between consumption of pornography and demand for sex trafficking.

The Anti-Vaxxer Vote,” by Caty Taborda. Does vaccination refusal break along party lines?

Cheats in Cleats,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. When sports scandals break, are they amplified by public notions of sport as an almost sacred space?

Workplaces May Create Inequalities at Home,” by Caty Taborda. Bringing work home has more than one meaning.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Valentine’s Day Fact Sheet on Healthy Sex,” by Adina Nack.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Schools Adopting Digital Tools Without Evidence that They Boost Student Achievement,” by Patricia Burch, Annalee Good, Caroly J. Heinrich, and Chandi Wagner.

A Few from the Community Pages:

The New Yorker: Champion of Serious Sociology

Images excerpted from New Yorker artists Simon Prades, Leo Espinosa, and Tony Rodriguez.
Images excerpted from New Yorker artists Simon Prades, Leo Espinosa, and Tony Rodriguez.

We sociologists tend to have a chip on our shoulder. We tend to think—not without substantial evidence, of course—that our research and ideas are not particularly visible or influential in the public realm, both in general and especially in comparison to our social science cousins. Maybe we should all be reading The New Yorker. It seems like we’ve got a few champions over there.

Exhibit A: A few weeks back, for example, the magazine ran an intriguing and insightful profile of Howie Becker. This was not a fluff piece. Inspired by Becker’s current popularity among a certain set of French sociologists in Paris (where the 86-year-old Becker now spends a great deal of his time), Adam Gopnik’s* article thoughtfully walks readers through Becker’s intellectual career and distinctive way of thinking about deviance, culture, and collective activity. This wonderfully written piece serves, I think, not only to introduce a broad, general audience of readers to one of the truly iconic (and iconoclastic) figures in sociology and his uniquely sociological worldview. More than this, it frames and situates Becker’s work in the broader history and current debates of the field in a subtle, sophisticated way that I believe proves provocative and edifying no matter how much we may already know and think about the discipline and Becker’s contributions to it. (For you insiders: Becker directs a zinger or two at Pierre Bourdieu along the way.)

Exhibit B: Last May, a review of recent books on office design by Jill Lepore was framed around a discussion of C. Wright Mills’s classic 1951 study White Collar. Although ostensibly about new studies of the new trends in office work, this review, at least in my reading, seems more fascinated with and driven by what Mills and his sociological perspective contribute to our understanding of life and work and contemporary work culture than anything written recently from more specialized scholars and fields.

Exhibit C: The latest example comes in this week’s issue, which carries a review of Orlando Patterson’s new edited volume (with Ethan Fosse, Harvard University Press) on race and culture by Kelefa Sanneh. (Special thanks to TSP board member Jack Delehanty for calling my attention to it, even before my copy of the magazine arrived in the mail. Yes, I still read the magazine the old-fashioned way.) It’s a typically well-written piece that lays out a hot sociological debate in language that is accessible to a wide range of people and without pulling any punches.

Sanneh starts by laying out how structuralists (a term he uses to describe the vast majority of sociologists who generally explain the problems of black poverty and inequality in terms of institutional discrimination and systemic racism) and culturalists (who, like Patterson, see merit in the idea that elements of black culture play a significant role in the perpetuation of racial disparities today) might understand the events of Ferguson and Staten Island differently. Sanneh then explains many problems with the culturalist approach, drawing on lots of other sociologists to bring in evidence of the structural problems that underlie the culturalists’ claims, and then nailing them with this uppercut: “Among Patterson, Fosse, and their peers, the tendency to write as if black culture were in exceptional crisis seems to be what a sociologist might call an unexamined injunctive norm: a shared prescriptive rule, one so ingrained that even its followers don’t realize it exists.” Whatever you may think of Patterson and his colleagues and whether you work in this area or not, this is serious sociology, deeply knowledgable about essential, ongoing debates in the field and how these matter for the most pressing, public issues of the day.

I don’t know who exactly is responsible for this attention, specifically if someone or groups of someones in our discipline is in the ear of the New Yorker editorial staff or what. (I’ve got my suspicions.) But I love the love for sociology.

Let me close with one of my favorite such pieces. It was published two years back in January of 2013 on the topic “how cities can be ‘climate-proofed’.” This piece didn’t actually have as much explicit sociology in it as some of those I’ve referenced above. But it was written by a sociologist. NYU’s Eric Klinenberg was called upon not just to review the sociological research contributions on the topic, but also—and more importantly— to provide a broad, cross-disciplinary synthesis and assessment of what is known about climate change and urban design, and then to draw out the implications and applications for future design and policy. That, in my view, was and is sociological thought at its biggest, broadest, and finest. It is what we sociologists—with our big theoretical visions, our critical thinking, our empirical grounding, and our technical skills—are uniquely positioned to offer to public policy and public debate. Keep it coming, The New Yorker, keep it coming.

_____

*Our associate editor, Letta Page, is convinced that Gopnik writes the best concluding sentences in the business. His book Angels and Ages makes her list of books social scientists should read to improve their own writing.

TSP’s Sociology Roundup: Feb. 5, 2015

RU020515This week on The Society Pages:

There’s Research on That!

Curbing Police Profiteering,” by Ryan Larson. New policies put the brakes on civil forfeiture. With research from Eric Blumenson, Eva Nilsen, John L. Worrall, and others.

Parents Prepping Kids for Racism,” by Lisa Gulya and Alex Manning. The NYTimes’ Charles Blow and NYC Mayor Bill deBlasio aren’t the only Americans who talk with their kids about expecting and reacting to discrimination. Research from Diane Hughes, Patricia Hill Collins, Cady Berkel, and Stephanie I. Coard.

The Reading List:

The Social Costs of Punishment, from Prisoners to Pupils,” by Jacqui Frost. Brea Perry and Edward Morris show how school suspensions lower all students’ achievement, even those who aren’t suspended.

Citings & Sightings:

2014: When Social Media Changed Sports Culture,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Dave Zirin on public pressures to address concussions and crimes, citing Harry Edwards from UC-Berkeley.

What Doulas Do,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. The social role and medical mediation work of doulas, citing Lisa Hall.

The Political and Cultural Problem of Paid Leave,” by Jack Delahanty. The NYTimes’ Upshot blog looks to Ruth Milkman‘s research on policies for working parents.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Learning about Commonalities Can Improve Student-Teacher Relationships and Boost Achievement,” by Hunter Gehlbach.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Gender Pay Gap by Race and Ethnicity,” by Sarah Jane Glynn and Jane Ferrell.

A Few from the Community Pages:

Our Latest Book!

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TSP’s Sociology Roundup: January 30, 2015

RU013015This week has seen the beginning of the new semester at the University of Minnesota and new additions to our TSP graduate editorial board. Be sure to follow these up-and-comers as they begin to report and shape sociology in the public sphere!

The Editors’ Desk:

Public Criminology and the Social Media Echo Chamber,” by Chris Uggen. How Uggen approaches public appearances and truly translating sociology for different audiences.

There’s Research on That!

Taking Stock of Torture,” by Evan Stewart. When it comes to interrogation techniques, the choice to use torture has little to do with proven outcomes. Stewart looks to research by Randall Collins, Jared Del Rosso, John Hagan, Gabrielle Ferrales, Guillermina Jasso, and Diane Vaughan.

The Reading List:

Active Learning and STEM Success,” by Amy August. New research from Scott Freeman and his colleagues compare the outcomes of teaching techniques, and Nobel Prize winning physicist Carl Wieman says, “Sounds about right.” (I’m paraphrasing here…)

Citings & Sightings:

Trial Hype: The Different Allures of the Tsarnaev and Hernandez Cases,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Northeastern University’s Jack Levin on how trials attract attention in specific ways.

Modeling: A Tough Job at Any Size,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Sociologist Amanda Czerniawski has walked a mile—or at least a runway—in those shoes.

A Sociology of Celebrity Sanctions,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. UT-Austin prof Ari Adut chimes in on when corporate interests start taking an interest in celebrity crimes.

Women at the Top Find the View Depressing,” by Caty Taborda. Tetyana Pudrovska shares findings from her research on highly successful women.

Twitter Tension?” by Sarah Catherine Billups. When it comes to social media, it’s not all bad news, says sociologist Dhiraj Murthy in Smithsonian Magazine.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

David Knoke on Network Analysis,” with Sarah Esther Lageson.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Targeting Muslims in the Name of National Security,” by Saher Selod.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Child-Rearing Norms and Practices in Contemporary American Families,” by Sandra Hofferth.

The Youth and Beauty Mystique: Its Costs for Women and Men,” by Stephanie Coontz.

A Few from the Community Pages:

Our Latest Book!

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Public Criminology and the Social Media Echo Chamber

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When the news came from Ferguson on November 24th, it was hard to know what to do. Every sociologist and criminologist possesses some pertinent expertise, whether we study violence, law, race, or criminal justice and injustice. But how and when should we engage? The streets were alive with protesters, police officers, and journalists. The President was calling for calm, which was itself a polarizing message. And Facebook feeds flowed with horrifying videos, rage, and invective, as many were “defriending” and “unfollowing” one another until their social networks were fully purged or converted.

Public scholars can and should step up in such highly-charged political moments, but there was little room to maneuver in those first few days. A dispassionate rendering of cold social facts – on the legal intricacies of grand jury indictment, for example – would ring hollow to those who saw the events in clear moral terms. A straightforward presentation of a pertinent research study – on the effectiveness of police body cameras, for example – would redirect energy and attention away from larger questions. And, to the extent we could actually penetrate the teeming information space, our statements would be reduced to 140-character factoids and channeled to those predisposed to agree with us already. How can we do good public work under such conditions?

In the tense days and nights after the indictment announcements, sociologists such as Michael Eric Dyson and Doug Hartmann made insightful big-picture contributions. Some of us wrote op-eds or gave interviews, others spoke at demonstrations or held teach-ins, and many more revamped our regular teaching and research activities. Like many of you, I found myself in several community forums, most recently with a sitting judge and a television reporter who would moderate our discussion. The talk had been scheduled for months as a wonky “nuts and bolts of justice reform” discussion, but the sudden surge of interest in crime and punishment reshaped our agenda. It would have been foolish, if not impossible, to ignore the protests and issues occurring right outside the door. Interest was high. We moved the event to a larger hall when we reached capacity and we recorded the proceedings for later broadcast. As I looked around the racially and socially diverse crowd of journalists, students, lawyers, teachers, police officers, formerly incarcerated people, and community members, I knew that dozens if not hundreds of my colleagues were similarly engaged in their communities. I claim no special expertise on these topics or events, but I share these personal reflections and suggestions in hopes of encouraging other section members who might wish to engage the public.

Position and Language

When speaking with a public audience, I try to remember that there are other experts in the room. For example, a middle-aged white guy like me has little authority or legitimacy regarding the subjective experience of interacting with police as a young African American in the central city. Put simply, many in attendance did not want or need me to lecture to them about how their communities are policed. So my job was to give due attention to race and justice while also acknowledging the real limits of my perspective and the research evidence I would cite. Thinking a personal story might help, I opened by acknowledging the #BlackLivesMatter and #CrimingWhileWhite campaigns and briefly noting my own juvenile arrests – and how the “judicious and humane discretion” of three Minnesota police officers was so important in my life that I thanked them by name in my dissertation acknowledgements. After repeated exposure to the Michael Brown and Eric Garner videos, few in the audience would have argued that men of color have been getting the same breaks that I received. As importantly, few would have argued against providing the same sort of breaks to all young people. Yet framing the issue in this way also helped make such points without bashing or demonizing those police officers – several of them my former students — who showed up at the forum.

This was not the night for a PowerPoint presentation, as personal stories are often more effective than statistics in helping audiences evaluate and reframe their image of crime and justice. I also called out Emily Baxter’s WeAreAllCriminals.com. Using evocative images and personal accounts, WAAC shows the blurriness of the criminal/non-criminal distinction. Terminology plays a similar role in public scholarship, where the wrong descriptor can quickly alienate half the audience. I try to use simple, neutral language to facilitate discussion, addressing people formally (e.g., as Ms. Johnson or Judge Castro, rather than as Angie or Lenny). In such forums, identifiers such as “police officer” or “formerly incarcerated” are more helpful and precise than terms like “cop” and “offender.”

Content and Context

Academics sometimes try to teach a whole semester’s worth of material in an hour, which dramatically exceeds anyone’s ability to process new information. I try to identify three to five key points and to make sure that they are well-supported in the literature. That is, that they are “near-consensus” areas in our field that the public might not yet appreciate. That night, I called out: (1) Tom Tyler’s work on procedural justice, and how treating people with dignity and respect engenders greater trust and legitimacy, regardless of the outcome of a citizen’s encounter with the criminal justice system; (2) social-psychological research on implicit bias, which shows that the great majority of Americans, including police officers and professors, hold unconscious group-based biases that affect our behavior; (3) a few well-chosen statistics on the basic race-specific rates of arrest and incarceration in our community; and, (4) the proportion of these arrests that are for low-level offenses that rarely result in prosecution or conviction. Local evidence is critical because the audience is far more engaged in practices close to home (and more likely to dismiss or discount bad things that happen elsewhere). Public criminology can also provide an important myth-busting function in such cases. For me, this meant calling out states like Minnesota and Wisconsin for having the nation’s worst racial disparities in correctional populations – a difficult but essential truth for the audience to grasp. Context is also important for drawing local, national, and international comparisons. For example, I explained how my home state was admirably stingy with prison beds, but profligate in putting people on very long probation terms.

Hope and Questions

Public events, to a far greater extent than academic talks, should leave the audience with a sense of efficacy, or at least hope for real change. I made sure to note that after four decades of rising incarceration, that criminal punishment had finally begun a modest decline. And, of course, that our community and the nation had enjoyed a 50 percent crime drop over the past two decades. To put this drop in perspective, I explained how this meant a decline from 100 Minneapolis murders in 1995 to about 40 the past few years. Nationally, I pointed to bipartisan reform efforts such as the REDEEM Act, cosponsored by Senators Corey Booker and Rand Paul. Locally, I identified bipartisan reforms such as the new Minnesota expungement law and a new ban-the-box provision that bars organizations from asking about criminal records on job applications, but permits them to inquire at the interview stage. I also tackled issues in my own area of research expertise, including local challenges to felon disenfranchisement and the broader problem of “piling on” so many collateral sanctions that they become criminogenic. In particular, I described recent testimony on behalf of six “model probationers,” who were hauled into court and charged with new felonies because they had voted while still “on paper.” A broad coalition was assembling to challenge the voting ban (including the district attorney charged who prosecuted those cases) and several audience members approached me after the event to ask how they could get involved. Finally, I spoke about the costs of diminished trust in the criminal justice system, including Todd Clear and Natasha Frost’s argument that the discretion to make back-end sentencing adjustments can help curb excess or gratuitous punishment – even, or especially, for those serving long sentences for violent crimes.

Public events work best when audience members have a chance to engage the speakers, and we received an impressive range of audience questions that evening. When asked about the prospects for a new social movement around criminal justice reform, I could applaud the efforts of students — and the members of this section — to shine a brighter light on crime, law, and justice in the contemporary United States. As a medical school colleague is fond of saying, sunshine can be a marvelous disinfectant. So too can public criminology.

For further reading, see Doug Hartmann’s Ferguson, the Morning After; Insights on Crime and Punishment from a Judge and a Sociologist, and Public Criminologies (with Michelle Inderbitzin).

Reprinted from Crime, Law & Deviance News, FALL/WINTER 2014 -2015.
Newsletter for the Crime, Law & Deviance section of the American Sociological Association

TSP’s Roundup: Jan. 22, 2015

RU012215 tintedWhat’s been happening in these here Society Pages? Good thing you asked!

There’s Research on That!

The Second Sex and Second-Class Citizenship, by Anne Kaduk. Pregnancy discrimination: There’s Research on That! Kaduk draws on articles from Reginald Byron, Vincent Roscigno, Jeanne Flavin, Lynn Paltrow, Stephen Benard, and Shelley J. Correll.

The Reading List:

Gay Marriage and God’s Gender, by Jack Delehanty. Research from Andrew Whitehead shows individuals’ ideas of a gendered god influence their opinions on marriage equality.

Individualism Increases Religious Pluralism, by Evan Stewart. In Sociological Science, Michael Hout and Claude S. Fischer revisit earlier data and try to explain religious disaffiliation.

Office Hours Podcast:

David Pellow on Nonhuman Members of the Community, with Erik Kojola. Pellow discusses his latest book, Total Liberation!, and how it helps us rethink who “counts” in community.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

Audrey Kobayashi on Focus Groups, Transnationalism, and Citizenship, with Kyle Green. Kobayashi joins the GMAC discussion to stump for the utility of focus groups.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Are African Americans Living the Dream 50 Years After Passage of the Civil Rights Act? by Velma McBride Murry and Na Liu. Data on education, wealth, income, health, and a variety of other measures paint a picture of persistent inequities.

Latinas Mystiques, by Lorena Garcia. Latina Americans are caught between expectations that hide the social forces restricting their opportunities.

Lesbian Mystiques, by Judith A. Howard. Even as prejudice and ignorance decline, discrimination remains a hurdle.

Scholars Strategy Network:

How New Digital Technologies Make It Possible To Privatize Censorship and Manipulate Citizen-Users, by Rex Troumbley. The consequences of “soft” technologies of control.

How U.S. Higher Education Promotes Inequality—And What Can Be Done To Broaden Access and Graduation, by Suzanne Mettler. Offering concrete ideas for policy change.

A Few from the Community Pages:

Our new book has arrived! We hope you’ll check out Owned, our look at the new sociology of debt.