Happy Friday the 13th! If you’re superstitious, check out some of our content on belief in the paranormal, witchcraft, and strange rituals. In new content this week, we have social science research on racial bias and the death penalty, a new study on how sexism harms health, and reflections on the long shadow of mass violence.

Special Feature:

New Abortion Laws Contribute to Sexist Environments that Harm Everyone’s Health,” by Patricia Homan. A new study shows that “structural sexism” is making people sick.

There’s Research on That!:

Racial Bias and the Death Penalty,” by Allison Nobles. In light of the Trump administration’s announcement that they will continue federal executions, we review research demonstrating racial biases play a key role in death sentences and executions in the United States.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

A Love that Does Justice,” by Myra Brown.

Being the Boss,” by Layne Amerikaner.

American Indians and Authentic Blood,” by  Le-My Tran.

Are Sociologists Next to Be Imprisoned and Tortured? A Call to Unite and Oppose the Criminalization of Social Science,” by David Lempert.

Sociological Images:

Normal Distributions in the Wild,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

My Sisters and the Long, Terrifying Shadow of Mass Violence, by Stacy Torres.


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Welcome back! This week we’ve got a new special feature about how residents experience gentrification, social science research on school choice and social inequality, and reflections on gendered wedding traditions.

Special Feature:

“Why Can’t Gentrification Fix What’s Already Here?” by Christina Jackson and Yasmine Payano. In our latest special feature, Jackson and Payano discuss how residents experience gentrification in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

There’s Research on That!:

School Choice and Social Inequality,” by Evan Stewart and Neeraj Rajasekar. Social science research comparing private and public approaches to schooling finds distinct benefits of public schools and questions whether more choice in schooling really helps everyone.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

There is No Green Book for Walking,” by Jennifer D. Roberts.

Sociological Images:

Surviving Student Debt,” by Amber Joy Powell.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Fall Wedding Season is upon Us — But Outdated, Gendered Traditions Don’t Have to Be,” by Stephanie Coontz.

And from the Community Pages:

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Greetings, social science fans! This week you’ll find social science research on how students benefit from after-school programs, changing family vacation norms, and reflections on the social impact of global population change.

There’s Research on That!:

How Students Benefit from After-School Programs,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. We revisit research demonstrating that students do benefit from after-school programs.

Clippings:

When the World Stops Growing,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. The Atlantic talks with sociologist Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue about how population changes may affect family structures.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Family Matters,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Won’t You Be My (Vacation) Neighbor? Second Homeowners and Changing Family Vacation Norms in the Sharing Economy,” by Michelle Janning.

And from the Community Pages:

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Welcome back! This week we’ve got a new special feature on changing global attitudes towards same-sex sexuality, as well as social science research on vigilantism in Latin America, and reflections on the role of images in genocide studies.

Special Feature:

Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian People Have Grown More Accepting around the World. Why? And What Obstacles Remain?” by Louisa L. Roberts. Roberts explores why there has been a favorable global shift in attitudes towards same-sex sexuality.

There’s Research on That!:

Vigilantism in Latin America,” by Isabel Arriagada and Lucas Lynch. Research on vigilante forms of justice in Latin America demonstrates how weak state institutions, like inadequate police forces, inefficient judicial systems, and corruption, can contribute to citizens taking the law into their own hands to provide justice and security in their communities.

And from the Community Pages:

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Hello! This week we’ve got social science research on gendered and racialized hierarchies of intelligence in classrooms, the rise of online dating, and life course and the gender wage gap. We’ve also got one more reason to major in sociology: data science! Sociological Images explains why sociologists are well-positioned for data science careers.

Discoveries:

Teaching the Gender and Race of Brilliance,” by Jean Marie Maier. New research in American Sociological Review finds that teachers’ responses to talking out of turn create a gendered and racialized hierarchy of intelligence in the classroom.

Clippings:

Online Dating Going Strong,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. The Atlantic talks with sociologists, Michael Rosenfeld and Jessica Carbino, about the continued rise of online dating.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Data Science Needs Social Science,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Unequal Pay for a Life of Unequal Work: Employment Over the Life Course and the Gender Wage Gap,” by Tania Cabello-Hutt and Kate Weisshaar.

And from the Community Pages:

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Welcome back to another week at TSP! In this roundup, you can find new research on the use of “civic talk” in discussions of racial diversity, and how the social environment affects impostor syndrome. We also have an interview with the parents of a hate-crime victim, a sociologist’s reflections on her new memoir, and an exploration of critical sports podcasts.

Discoveries:

The “Civic Talk” of Diversity,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. New research in City & Community finds that residents use “civic talk” to voice misgivings about living in a diverse area while still presenting diversity as positive.

Social Environment Influences Impostor Syndrome,” by Mark Lee. New research in The Sociological Quarterly finds that the social environment — such as organizational rules, incentives, and culture — affects the development of impostor syndrome.

From Our Partners:

Contexts:

Hate Crimes and Domestic Terrorism on Campus,” by Rashawn Ray.

Council on Contemporary Families:

3Q With Deborah J. Cohan,” by Barbara J. Risman.

And from the Community Pages:

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Hi Everyone! This week we’ve got a new special feature on gender and racial diversity in the highest paid CEOs in the United States. Spoiler alert: there isn’t much. We’ve also got social science research on student debt and its disparate impacts by race and gender, as well as a review of Caity Collins’ book, Making Motherhood Work.

Special Feature:

The Highest Paid CEOs: Still White, Still Male,” by Richard L. Zweigenhaft. In our newest feature, Zweigenhaft explores gender and racial diversity within the highest paid CEOs in the United States.

There’s Research on That!:

Race, Gender, and Surviving Student Loan Debt,” by Amber Joy Powell. In light of recent conversations and debates about student loan debt, we rounded up social science research on the conditions driving student loan debt and its disparate impacts by race and gender.

From Our Partners:

Council on Contemporary Families:

Review of Collins’ “Making Motherhood Work,” by Alicia M. Walker.

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Hello again! In new content this week, we’ve got social science research on wealth, religion, and cohabitation trends; social and psychological factors affecting veterans’ long-term health; and how corporations use aesthetic deception on the internet.

Editors Desk:

ASA’s New Network for Social Engagement,” by Doug Hartmann and Chris Uggen. The American Sociological Association launches a new initiative to connect sociologists to other organizations in an exciting way.

Discoveries:

Indirect Effects of Combat on Veterans’ Health,” by Allison Nobles. New research in Socius finds that veterans’ long-term health is explained by more than combat experience itself. Poor health can result from a variety of social and psychological processes in veterans’ lives after returning home.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Happy Birthday, SocImages!” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Who Cohabits? Evidence about Wealth and Religion Tells a Changing Story,” by Virginia Rutter.

And from the Community Pages:

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We think of the Society Pages as a place for social scientists to connect with public issues and audiences. Sociology’s professional organization, the American Sociological Association, has a new initiative to connect sociologists to other organizations in an exciting way.

The Sociology Action Network (or SAN ) will match ASA members who are interested in volunteering their sociological expertise with not-for-profit organizations in need of technical assistance. If you or your organization are intrigued by this possibility, the project is up and running so the time is now!

SAN volunteers help organizations in many ways, including conducting needs assessments and program evaluations, reviewing technical reports, writing grants, and providing training.  In the process of helping a local organization achieve their goals, you will be helping to expand the public’s understanding of sociology and its value to society. 

Sign up here to become a SAN volunteer today. And/or learn more about the initiative by coming to the SAN workshop at the upcoming 2019 Annual Meetings in New York. (Full disclosure: Doug is on the advisory board and will be on the panel in August, and Chris was a member of the ASA council that approved the project). The more, the merrier — and the more meaningful use of your sociological knowledge and skills.

Welcome back! This week we’ve got social science research on technological inequalities, the transformative power of parties, and cohabitation trends for the financially insecure.

There’s Research on That!:

Technological Inequalities in Society,” by Allison J. Steinke. The internet may seem like a neutral tool, but social science research shows that technology has a dark side.

Discoveries:

The Social Side of the Solo Cup,” by Isabel Arriagada. New research in Social Psychology Quarterly finds that social occasions have the power to be transformative in positive and negative ways.

From Our Partners:

Sociological Images:

Crowding Out Crime,” by Evan Stewart.

Soccer Stars & Soc Majors,” by Evan Stewart.

Council on Contemporary Families:

From Countercultural Trend to Strategy for the Financially Insecure: Premarital Cohabitation and Premarital Cohabitors, 1956-2015,” by Arielle Kuperberg.

And from the Community Pages:

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