Social Studies
MN

Political Science

Preparing students to confront vital issues, raise critical perspectives, and explore new methodologies in the study of the fundamental concepts of power and change.

The Return of Populist Politics?

Research from UMN political science looks at whether and how populism made a difference in the 2016 election.

When Policy Preferences are Sacred

UMN political scientists look at what makes people pay attention to policy agendas.

Good Question: What Is A Congressional Caucus?

All this talk of the House Freedom Caucus raises Good Questions about politics like, what is a congressional caucus? And how do they work? UMN Political scientist Kathryn Pearson helps answer this question.

Is the Other Side Really that Stupid? Research Says Probably Not

Political parties have different ideologies, but similar IQ scores.

Conspiring Together

UMN political scientists show how conspiracy theories are politically motivated—and more common than we think.

Why More Democrats Are Now Embracing Conspiracy Theories

UMN political scientists Christina Farhart, Joanne Miller, and Kyle Saunders study how Democrats and Republicans changed in their conspiracy beliefs during the 2016 election.

Panel: Knowledge Production and Public Engagement

A panel discussion, moderated by the Humphrey School’s Larry Jacobs, explores and responds to New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof’s critique of the social sciences as creating a “culture of exclusivity.” U of M faculty panelists include Doug Hartmann, Kathryn Pearson, Tim Brennan, Joann Miller, and Joe Soss.

Thinking about Trayvon: Privileged Response and Media Discourse

A classic roundtable discussion from The Society Pages features U of M professors Zenzele Isoke and Enid Logan. Isoke issues a damning critique of media constructions of balance: “When the media panders to both sides or both ‘storylines’ … it makes a mockery of the political community. The media operates on the fiction that both sides are ‘equally valid,’ when clearly they are not.”