Social Studies
MN

Discoveries

New and exciting research from CLA researchers.

Atheists Remain Most Disliked Religious Minority in the U.S.

Ten years ago University of Minnesota sociologists conducted research showing that, among a long list of racial and religious minority groups, atheists were the most disliked group of people in the United States. Last month they followed up with new research that shows that Americans still have negative opinions of atheists and the non-religious–and now…

Morality Built Upon Atheism?

Salon.com digs into research from U of M sociologists Penny Edgell, Joseph Gerteis, and Doug Hartmann that shows atheists remain America’s most disliked “religious” group.

All Work and No Play with Children Make Moms Less Happy Parents

A team of researchers from Cornell University, the University of Minnesota, and Minnesota Population Center have used time diary data to find that mothers are less happy than fathers with their parenting duties.

Driven To Want the Tough Conversations

Psychologist Richard Lee says parents have the tendency to sit back and wait for their children to bring up issues of race and ethnicity when they’re older, but kids can sense that hesitancy, and the conversations can happen too late or not at all.

Discovery: Gender-based Violence against Men in Darfur

U of M sociologist Gabrielle Ferrales and alumni Hollie Nyseth Brehm and Suzy McElrath author new study on sexual violence against men and boys in the Rwandan genocide. “Although this violence is in some ways about physical domination, it is primarily meant to symbolically dominate and denigrate both the victims and surviving community members,” writes J. Sigru Wahutu.

Effects of Gender and Ethnicity on Workplace Charitable Giving

A collaborative study between the Center for the Study of the Individual and Society and the Carlson School of Management considers the links between workplace diversity and efforts toward corporate social responsibility.

There's Research on That! Refugees and Social Instability

A research roundup of social science on the motives and meanings of migration highlights work from U of M sociologist Cawo Abdi.