Fraulion sent in this screenshot from the Amazon.com homepage.  In case you needed help buying gifts, dads like history and politics, moms like to smell nice and look shiny, girlfriends and wives like chick flicks and cute stuff, boyfriends and husbands like classic rock and knowing what time it is, grandpas like to watch documentaries (probably about “the war”), and grandmas just want to look at pictures of their grandchildren.

Last but not least, Rob W. sent in another Amazon.com gift guide that suggests that women want a masculine-looking watch and men want a wine aerator (I don’t know what that is, but wine is woman-y right?).  So… counter-stereotypical push back against the gender machine?  Or a typo?  I’m going with typo.  Funny typo.

More after the jump:

Alex T. sent in pages from a toy catalog put out by the Australian superstore, Myer.  Judging by its pages, boys enjoy pretending to be scientists, engineers, and soldiers (or generally shooting things), whereas girls like to cook, cook, take care of babies, clean, and look pretty:

A reader-who-prefers-to-remain anonymous sent in a link to the Pottery Barn Kids holiday catalog.  Sandwiched between two more gender neutral sets of pages are the obviously boy and girl sections.  These two pictures pretty much sum it up:

Interestingly, the reader said that the print version of the magazine was very slightly less gender-stereotypical and more race-mixed.

For a gift guide that’s not-so-gendered, visit Think Geek.  Fitz sent in links to the “For Him” and “For Her” pages on the site.  The gift guide is gendered, then, as opposed to being organized in some other way, but the suggested presents aren’t as strongly gendered as we see elsewhere.  Not only is there some overlap, but things like bacon-flavored chapstick and a pizza cutter in the shape of the Star Trek enterprise are suggested for women and things like cupcake-flavored mints and mini stuffed microbes are suggested for men.  So, it’s no gender-free panacea, but it’s less binary than we’re used to.

For gendered Christmas gift guides from previous years, see Gift Giving with Gender StereotypesMore Gender Gift Giving and AdvertisingAnother Gendered Gift Guideand more Gendered Gift Guides.  Sorry about the repetitive, boring post titles… but gender stereotypes are, in fact, repetitive and boring!!!

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.
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