Matthew Huber, “Lifeblood: Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Geography]  Lifeblood: Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital (University of Minnesota Press, 2013) is an incisive look into how oil permeates our lives and helped shape American politics during the twentieth century. Author Matthew Huber shows the crucial role oil and housing policy played in the New Deal and how, in subsequent decades, government [...]

Hugh F. Cline, “Information Communication Technology and Social Transformation: A Social and Historical Perspective”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] There is no doubt that innovations in technology have had, and are having, a significant impact on society, changing the way we live, work, and play. But the changes that we are seeing are far from novel. In fact, most are a continuation of changes to society and societal structure with [...]

Adrienne Trier-Bieniek, “Sing Us a Song, Piano Woman: Female Fans and the Music of Tori Amos”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Pop Music] What are female fans of popular music seeking and hearing when they listen to music and attend concerts? In an innovative and fascinating study entitled Sing Us a Song, Piano Woman: Female Fans and the Music of Tori Amos (The Scarecrow Press, 2013)  Adrienne Trier-Bieniek goes inside the fan culture that surrounds Tori Amos [...]

Philip Kretsedemas, “Migrants and Race in the US: Territorial Racism and the Alien/Outside”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Philip Kretsedemas is the author of Migrants and Race in the US: Territorial Racism and the Alien/Outside (Routledge, 2014). Kretsedemas is associate professor of sociology at University of Massachusetts-Boston. This is the second time he has been featured on New Books in Political Science podcast. In Migrants and Race in the US, Kretsedemas explains [...]

Deborah Mayersen, “On the Path to Genocide: Armenia and Rwanda Reexamined”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Genocide] I live and work in the state of Kansas in the US.  We think of ourselves as living in tornado alley and orient our schedules in the spring around the weather report.  Earthquakes are something that happen somewhere else. Recently, however, our southern neighbor, Oklahoma, has been rocked repeatedly by minor [...]

Hahrie Han, “How Organizations Develop Activists: Civic Associations & Leadership in the Twenty-First Century”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Hahrie Han has written How Organizations Develop Activists: Civic Associations & Leadership in the Twenty-First Century (Oxford UP, 2014). Han is associate professor of political science at Wellesley College. She has previously written Groundbreakers: How Obama’s 2.2 Million Volunteers Transformed Campaigns in America. Han’s book explores the world of activism, and the role organizations play [...]

Katherine Frank, “Plays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Anthropology] Dr. Katherine Frank’s book, Plays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex (Rowman & Littlefield, 2013), is a fascinating look at the taboo of group sex. Her robust research spans historical references to modern day accounts throughout cultures around the world. Dr. Frank used surveys, interviews, and ethnographic research to [...]

Karl Spracklen, “Whiteness and Leisure”

[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] Our taken for granted assumptions are questioned in a new book by Karl Spracklen, a professor of leisure studies at Leeds Metropolitan University in England. Whiteness and Leisure (Palgrave, 2013) combines two bodies of theoretical literature to interrogate leisure activities which seem innocuous or inoffensive. The book deploys insights from critical race theory [...]

Matt Grossmann, “Artists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945″

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Matt Grossmann is back on the podcast with his newest book, Artists of the Possible: Governing Networks and American Policy Change Since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 2014). Grossmann is associate professor of political science at Michigan State University. He is also author of The Not-So-Special Interests, for which he appeared on the podcast in [...]

Marianne Constable, “Our Word is Our Bond: How Legal Speech Acts”

[Cross-Posted from New Books in Law] Our Word is Our Bond: How Legal Speech Acts (Stanford UP, 2014), by UC Berkeley Professor of Rhetoric Marianne Constable, impels its readers to reassess the dominant methods of considering what is law. Constable’s study of law is informed by both philosophy and sociology; however, she avoids common approaches employed by both disciplines and [...]