TSP’s First 2015 Sociology Roundup

Ru011215Oh, it’s time! Since we last checked in, TSP has been abuzz, taking on topics from the sociology of protest photos to the construction of consent, how to best build a diverse coalition, and the glorious launch of our latest podcast, “Give Methods a Chance”! Here’s the news you need to know (and some stuff that’s just plain interesting):

Features:

The Social Construction of Consent,” by Jill D. Weinberg. You can’t get to “yes” without first asking a question.

Between Protestors and Police: How a Photojournalist Got ‘The Shot’,” by Josh Page. Oakland photographer Noah Berger talks exclusively to TSP about catching a shot that went viral. Related: “‘I Can Breathe’ and the Occasional Fear of Photographing Protest,” by Steven W. Thrasher on the Contexts blog.

There’s Research on That!

New Tech Gifts Bring Festive Firewalls,” by Evan Stewart.”

The Reading List:

Shared Values and Common Dreams,” by Erik Kojola.

First Comes Love, Then Comes… Union Membership?” by Anne Kaduk.

Seeing Gentrification Using Google Street View,” by Stephen Suh.

Praying Away Group Difference,” by Jack Delehanty.

Citings & Sightings:

Suicide and the Loss of Employment and Identity,” by Erik Kojola.

Office Hours Podcast:

Tim Pippert on Diversity in College Recruitment Brochures,” with Matt Gunther.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

Deborah Carr on Longitudinal Studies,” with Sarah Esther Lageson.

Francesca Polletta on Coding Stories and Studying Online Forums,” with Kyle Green.

The Editors’ Desk:

“Best of… 2014″—Council on Contemporary Families Edition.

“Best of… 2014″—Contexts Blog Edition.

Methods are Beautiful,” by Chris Uggen.

“Best of… 2014″—Grad Board Edition.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Are Americans Really Anti-Intellectual?” by Aaron S. Lecklider.

Helping the Growing Ranks of Poor Immigrants Living in America’s Suburbs,” by Els de Graauw, Shannon Gleeson, and Irene Bloemraad.

The Roots of Multicultural Diversity in Revolutionary America,” by Ben Railton.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Lesbian Mystiques,” by Judith A. Howard.

Greater Acceptance, Persisting Antipathy: Catholic and Jewish Americans Since the Civil Rights Era,” by Jerry Park, Joshua Tom, and Brita Andercheck.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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Our Latest BookOwned, on the emerging sociology of debt, is now available from W.W. Norton & Co.

TSP’s Soc Roundup: Nov. 10, 2014

RU111014And here we thought it was just impolite to point at others… Since the last roundup, we weathered #pointergate, talked about bodies, learned that heterosexual marriages really are getting more egalitarian, and chatted up Michael Burawoy, that pioneering public sociologist. Binge read or save for the week, all we ask is that you share. TSP is free and accessible, and we want the whole world to put on their SocGoggles!

Features:

Troubling Bodies with Natalie Boero, C.J. Pascoe, and Abigail Saguy,” by Kyle Green. Too fat, too thin, unhealthy, brawny, boney, slutty, boyish, zaftig, and puny. Our societies have a lot to say about bodies; sociologists have a few comments of their own.

There’s Research on That!

#pointergate, Moral Panic, and Online Protest,” by Jack Delahanty. Media goes for sensationalism and social media allows marginalized groups to have bigger voices. Somewhere in the middle, a Minneapolis police group got the “outrage” they wanted and a backlash they didn’t expect.

Harassment Online and On the Street,” by Evan Stewart. Bullying, cat-calling, and the policing of norms and hierarchies—how discrimination and power combine in routine harassment.

Studying Whiteness: Not Beyond the Pale,” by Stephen Suh. When “white” is the neutral, default, or unmarked racial category, it’s easy to argue that society is “beyond race.”

Foraging in the Urban Jungle: Food Security and Homelessness,” by Matt Gunther. A police captain from Cincinnati says “don’t feed the bears [homeless people],” and at least 21 American cities agree. But does helping hunger really hinder social mobility?

The Reading List:

Second-Generation Schooling: Good News for Girls,” by Amy August. Sociology of Education reports that girls, given the opportunity to succeed, will seize it.

Office Hours:

Michael Burawoy on Global Social Movements,” with Erik Kojola. Exploring the future of social movements research within modern public universities.

The Editors’ Desk:

Facebook, Feelings, and Flight Attendants,” by Doug Hartmann. The managed heart at 50,000 feet and among 5 billion “friends.”

Face Work from Zellweger to Goffman,” by Doug Hartmann. Wearing our selves on our sleeves (if not our faces).

Teaching TSP:

Mediating Media Responses to Tragedy: Considering How Social Science Could Influence Policy.” An activity for talking through mass shootings in their cultural contexts.

Politics and Power.” Using Vincent Roscigno’s “Power, Sociologically Speaking” to debate popular notions of what power is, does, and should be.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Not Just Attitudes: Marriage is Also Becoming More Egalitarian,” by Christine R. Schwartz.

Trends in Global Gender Equity: Progress and Disappointments from around the World,” by Stephanie Seguino.

Scholars Strategy Network:

$2-a-Day Poverty in the United States,” by Luke Shaefer and Kathryn Edin.

Why America’s Food Is Still Not Safe,” by Adam Sheingate.

Forward or Back on Voting Rights? A Research Compendium,” by the Scholars Strategy Network.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s Sociology Roundup: Oct. 27, 2014

RU102714Ooh, it’s almost Halloween! That means it’s time to for a few classics, including the annual holiday roundup from Sociological Images. Here’s what we’ve been up to this week:

Office Hours Podcasts:

Michael Burawoy on Global Social Movements,” with Matt Gunther.

There’s Research on That!

Gender Pay Gaps: The Silicon Ceiling?” by Anne Kaduk.

Citings & Sightings:

NFL’s Domestic Abuse Prevention Team Drafts Sociologist Beth Richie,” by Amy August.

Scholars Strategy Network:

How To Increase Voter Turnout in Communities Where People Have Not Usually Participated in Elections,” by Melissa R. Michelson.

Teaching TSP:

Politics and Power, A Classroom Exercise.” Related, “Power, Sociologically Speaking,” by Vincent J. Roscigno.

A Few from The Community Pages:

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TSP Roundup: Oct. 22, 2014

Ru102214A week’s worth of sociology, at your fingertips! It must be the future.

Features:

‘Technological Optimism': Egg-Freezing a Better Deal for Companies than for Women,” by Rene Almeling, Joanna Radin, and Sarah S. Richardson.

Teaching TSP:

Desistance and Reentry: An activity for the LCD classroom.”

Citings & Sightings:

Ebola Scares: When Panic is a Pathogen,” by Evan Stewart.

Pushing Secret Service Director Off the Glass Cliff?” by Matt Gunther.

There’s Research on That!

Tax Haven Mavens,” Erik Kojola.

Tactical Textbooks: The Politics of Teaching History,” by Jack Delahanty.

Linking Up with New Social Networks,” by Evan Stewart.

The Reading List:

The Social Construction of Funny,” by Stephen Suh.

The Council on Contemporary Families:

Not Everybody is Hooking Up at College—Here’s Why,” by Rachel Allison and Barbara Risman.

Civil Rights for Women, 1964–2014,” by Max Coleman.

Scholars Strategy Network:

To Understand Elective Officeholding by Minorities, Look at Who Runs for Election, Not Just Who Wins,” by Paru R. Shah.

Why Jobless Americans Experience Deep and Prolonged Distress,” by Cristobal Young.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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Roundup Party

RU091214Oh hi. Between the start of the semester, sickness, and the mustering of a new grad board, the poor Roundup has gone un-rounded! Time to remedy that, with a Roundup of epic scale. There’s something for everyone, so let that sociological imagination run wild! And don’t forget, if you’re an educator or a student, to let us know how you’re using TSP in your classrooms. It always helps us find new directions!

Features:

The Feel of Faith,” by Daniel Winchester. Examining the physical artifacts of Eastern Orthodox worship.

Office Hours:

Ken Kolb on Moral Wages,” with Matt Gunther. A podcast on why public servants persevere, even when they don’t profit.

There’s Research on That!:

Crime and Scandal in the NFL,” by Ryan Larson. There isn’t a higher incidence of crime among NFL players, but there is a higher incidence of domestic violence; public outrage rises when punishments don’t seem to align with crimes; and how organizations handle scandal.

Homelessness at the VMAs,” by Jacqui Frost. Framing social problems and the “deserving” needy.

Reflecting on Ferguson,” by Evan Stewart. Militarization, gender, and race—dimensions that shape communities and policing.

Reading List:

Class and the Old-for-Your-Grade Advantage,” by Amy August. And here you thought hockey prowess was the only reason to delay a kid’s school start…

The Editors’ Desk:

Books, Big Aspirations, and Social Facts,” by Doug Hartmann. Starting the first semester of his new “Great Books in Sociology” class catches Doug considering why so many media outlets are calling for facts on the “Ferguson situation” when there are already so many facts close at hand (then provides a handy reading list).

Citings & Sightings:

Canada: Commit Sociology, Protect Indigenous Women,” by Amy August. Canada works to #BringBackOurGirls as hundreds and hundreds of aboriginal women and girls go missing.

When Countries Develop, Women Get Smarter Faster,” by Kat Albrecht. We suspect the reverse may be true, too.

Marriage and the Market: How Economic Inequality and Gender Equality Shape Marriage Trends,” by Jacqui Frost. The pushes and pulls of marriage and divorce rates in the U.S.

Urban Planners in Zarazoga Test the Waters,” by Andrew Wiebe. A Spanish sociologist helps a city shift from a focus on supply to one on demand—with help from some stats, of course.

Scholars Strategy Network:

How Fathers’ Imprisonment Undercuts Children’s Readiness for School—Especially Hurting Black Boys,” by Anna R. Haskins.

How Emergency Managers and Community Organizations Can Cooperate to Handle Disasters,” by Scott E. Robinson.

Attacking Iran’s Nuclear Facilities Would Likely Radicalize the Islamic Republic’s Government and Politics,” by Matthew Gratias.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Homesick Kids and Helicopter Parents: Watch that Judgment of ‘Kids Today’!” by Susan Matt.

Overwork May Explain 10% of Men’s Wage Advantage,” by Youngjoo Cha.

In School, Good Looks Hurt and Good Looks Help (But They Mostly Help),” by Rachel A. Gordon and Robert Crosnoe.

Promoting Marriage Among Single Mothers: An Ineffective Weapon in the War on Poverty,” by Kristi Williams.

A Few From the Community Pages:

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Color LinesOur Latest Book!

TSP Weekly Roundup: August 11, 2014

As so much of the sociological knowledge bank begins packing their bags for San Francisco, we here at TSP are keeping it lively with timely works on deportation, urban planning, the social structure of time, pandemics, and statistically significant others. Enjoy!

Features:

What’s Missing from the Debate Over Deportation Numbers,” by Tanya Golash-Boza. The laws surrounding immigration and removal have not changed, but enforcement sure has.

Citings & Sightings:

Urban Planners in Zaragoza Test the Waters,” by Andrew Wiebe. An “embedded sociologist” at a Spanish NGO works to reduce water demands in drought-plagued city.

Reading List:

You Don’t Need a Job to Have a Case of the Monday’s,” by Anne Kaduk. In a classic case of W.I. Thomas’s dictum that what we treat as real is real, the structure of the work week means even the unemployed feel a little glum when Monday rolls around.

There’s Research on That!

Ebola and the Epidemic Mindset,” by Evan Stewart. Research helps explain how media and governments shape the way citizens respond to outbreaks.

Scholars’ Strategy Network:

Why Politically Active Billionaires Threaten the Health of Democracy,” by Darrell M. West.

How Policy Analysis Can Help Inform Efforts to Improve Social Programs,” by Judith E. Barnstone.

Lessons from Rwanda’s Quest for a Just Response to Genocide,” by Hollie Nyseth Brehm and Chris Uggen.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Back on Track? Stall and Rebound for Gender Equality, 1977-2012,” by David A. Cotter, Joan M. Hermsen, and Reeve Vanneman.

A Few from the Community Pages:

Weekly Roundup: July 28, 2014

RU072814Umm, you guys? Did you know July’s almost over? That’s… that’s too much to think about, really. So let’s talk about soc, baby.

Features:

Of Carbon and Cash,” by Erin Hoekstra. Could reparations for environmental damage flow as easily as pollution from the Global North to the Global South?

Office Hours:

Chad Lavin on Eating Anxiety,” with Matt Gunther. On the politics of our food choices.

There’s Research on That!

When Child Migrants Weren’t an Unwelcome Problem,” by Lisa Gulya and Stephen Suh. While politicians are busy blaming each other (slash coming up with conspiracy theories) for a recent influx of minor immigrants, research shows times when the U.S. has happily welcomed such kids.

The Editors’ Desk:

Feminist Reflections,” by Chris Uggen. Welcoming our latest Community Page!

Citings & Sightings:

The Overblown Myth of the Boomerang Generation,” by Amy August. Did the Baby Boomers birth a Boomerang Generation? Not really, says Rick Settersten.

Marriage or the Baby Carriage,” by Andrew Wiebe. Andrew Cherlin takes a look at the connections between education levels and parenthood choices.

Scholars Strategy Network:

In Dealing with Iran, the Best Option for Israel Is to Strike First—Diplomatically,” by Steven Weber. Make love not war! Or maybe just extend an olive branch? You don’t have to make out or anything. Unless you want to.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Red States, Blue States, and Divorce: Understanding the Impact of Conservative Protestantism on Regional Variation in Divorce Rates,” by Stephanie Coontz. Adding to findings from the American Journal of Sociology, Coontz looks at why divorce rates are higher in religiously conservative “red states.”

A Few From the Community Pages:

Weekly Roundup: July 21, 2014

RU072114This week, TSP was pleased to welcome our latest Community Page, Feminist Reflections; to host Tristan Bridges (one of Feminist Reflections’ contributors) on Office Hours, and to talk baby contagions and blocking contraception at the Supreme Court. What else did we get up to?

Office Hours:

Tristan Bridges on Hybrid Masculinities and Sexual Aesthetics,” with Kyle Green. Being straight but not narrow and changing masculine norms along the way.

There’s Research on That!

Religion, Reproduction, and the Supreme Court,” by Jacqui Frost. Hobby Lobby and Wheaton College’s cases before the SCOTUS reveal just one facet of the constraints on women’s access to reproductive health services.

Reading List:

Testing in the Trenches,” by Evan Stewart. In Sociology of Education, Jennifer Jennings and Heeju Sohn consider whether both high and low achieving kids are left behind when teachers have to do perform “educational triage” before high-stakes testing.

Citings & Sightings:

Baby-onic Plague,” by Kat Albrecht. The Chicago Tribune considers international research identifying three reasons women seem to catch a “case of the kids” from their circle of friends.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Gender Equality: Family Egalitarianism Follows Workplace Opportunity,” by Philip N. Cohen. Traditional male and female arrangements in housework became more balanced as the labor market opened up in the 1970s and ’80s. Why has it stalled since then?

A Few from the Community Pages:

Weekly Roundup: June 30, 2014

RU063014A difficult, reflective (if not reflexive) weekend that saw the TSP crew scattered about the country was rewarded, at least to some small degree, this morning, when we arrived at TSP’s HQ to find a squat little box containing our latest volume with W.W. Norton & Co., Color Lines and Racial Angles. The third in our series of readers, this book brings in big names like Douglas Massey, Jennifer Lee, David Pellow, Charles A. Gallagher, and Michelle Alexander with core contributions, cultural contexts, and critical takes on the construction, understanding, and functioning of race in American society. Perfect for an intro class, the slim volume literally fits in a roomy pocket and serves as an accessible entry-point for developing the sociological imagination. For everything else, hop right on in to this week’s roundup!

The Editors’ Desk:

The TSP Debt Series,” by Chris Uggen. Introducing a summer’s worth of readings on debt, inequality, and the life course in the United States today. From student debt to credit cards, legal debt, the return of the debtor’s prison, climate change, and reparations, these pieces comprise an incredible introduction and will be released in a volume, Owned, this fall. For now, they’re free online, of course!

Features:

“Has Borrowing Replaced Earning?” by Kevin Leicht. The first in a three-part series, this article explores the growth of and change in credit in the U.S. over the past three generations, as measured against wage growth.

Office Hours:

John Skrentny on Racial Realism and Civil Rights,” with Sarah Lageson. The author of After Civil Rights: Racial Realism in the New American Workplace joins us to discuss how racial diversity works at work.

Citings & Sightings:

A New Kind of Kryptonite,” by Kat Albrecht. As Dustin Kidd muses, “What are you supposed to wear to a convention if your comic book idol’s costume is a corset and a thong?”

Religion and Your Resume: Even More Hiring Discrimination,” by Evan Stewart. To the extent it’s legal to withhold, don’t mention your race, criminal record, finances, height, age, or religion—even in the most glancing reference—on your job app. Trust us.

Scholars Strategy Network:

New Measures Reveal the True Impact of America’s Anti-Poverty Programs,” by Jane Waldfogel. How well is welfare?

Council on Contemporary Families:

From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: What Unions Do for Women,” by Ruth Milkman. Why women today still need unions.

 A Few from the Community Pages:

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Weekly Roundup: June 23, 2014

RU062314Features:

Deep Play and Flying Rats, with Colin Jerolmack,” by Kyle Green. The contingent relationships between people and pigeons. Oh, and the Million Dollar Pigeon Race.

Citings & Sightings:

Colbert: If Hispanics Identify as White, GOP’s Alright,” by Kat Albrecht. In a recent wørd segment, the Colbert Report highlighted sociological research on changing racial identifications.

There’s Research on That!

Why Students Don’t Sweat Sweatshops,” by Jacqui Frost. Remember the uproar over sweatshop labor that led to the rise of brands like American Apparel? Why hasn’t it taken hold with similar reports about today’s iPhones, Nikes, and other items?

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Deportation Crisis for Latino Men and Their Families,” by Tanya Golash-Boza.

Council on Contemporary Families:

From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: What Unions Do for Women,” by Ruth Milkman.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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