TSP’s Weekly Roundup: March 20, 2015

RU032015

Welcome, spring! Here’s some fresh soc to start the season off right.

Office Hours Podcast:

Victor Rios on Policing Black and Latino Boys,” with Sarah Shannon. A TSP-alum, Shannon talks with Rios about his award-winning book Punished.

The Editors’ Desk:

Education & Society,” by Chris Uggen. Welcoming TSP’s newest Community Page, under the direction of Rob Warren.

Midwest Sociological Society Meetings: Register Now!” An update from MSS president Doug Hartmann on the meetings, which will feature Dalton Conley and Lisa Wade.

There’s Research on That!

Joke’s on You: The Italy/ISIS Twitter Exchange,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. With research from Christie Davies, Elise Kramer, Karen Parkhill, and more.

Race and the Classroom,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. With research from Sylvia Hurtado, Josh Packard, Lisa M. Nunn, and more.

How Hate Crimes Count,” by Evan Stewart, Jack Delehanty, Ryan Larson, and Stephen Suh. With research from Ryan King, Jack Glaser, Louise Cainkar, and more.

The Reading List:

Misdemeanors as a Form of Social Control,” by Ryan Larson. New work from Issa Kohler-Hausmann.

Egalitarian Dreams, Unequal Marriages,” by Anne Kaduk. Research from David S. Pedulla and Sarah Thebaud.

Talking Trash: High Status Explanations for Watching Low Brow TV,” by Sarah Catherine BillupsCharles Allan McCoy and Roscoe Scarborough in Poetics.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

Matthew Hughey on His Tripartite Methodological Approach to Understanding Film,” with Kyle Green. TSP alum Green interviews UConn’s Hughey.

Citings & Sightings:

Subsidizing the Suburban Commute,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Alexandra Murphy on why social programs must extend to transportation.

Old Dogs, New Tricks,” by Sarah Catherine BillupsChristine Whelan on SMART goal-setting.

“‘Treat Yo’Self’ to Some Sociology,” by Caty Taborda. Comic and actor Aziz Ansari teams up with sociologist Eric Klinenberg. The rest is… a new book!

D8TR Dilemma: Millennials ‘Just Talking’, ‘Hanging Out’,” by Sarah Catherine BillupsKathy Hull on the new terminology of budding relationships.

Unsurprising Stats: Hollywood Lacks Diversity,” by Caty Taborda. UCLA’s Darnell Hunt and Ana-Christina Ramon see hope for diversity in new entertainment production platforms like Netflix.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Financial Reforms Alone Cannot Reduce Household Debts for Americans Facing Low Wages and Insecure Jobs,” by Sara M. Bernardo.

The Harm Done by Media Coverage of Political Disputes about Public Health Measures,” by Erika Fowler and Sarah Gollust.

Council on Contemporary Families:

An Analysis of New Census Data on Family Structure, Education, and Income,” by Shannon Cavanagh.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s Weekly Roundup: Feb. 27, 2015

RU022715February may be a short month, but we’re never short on sociology to share.

Roundtables:

Is the (Tea) Party Over?” by Erik Kojola and Jack Delehanty. Scholars Meghan A. BurkeRuth BraunsteinAndrew Perrin, and Robert Horwitz weigh in on the past, present, and future of a young political movement.

The Editors’ Desk:

Oscar Winners Put Social Issues Center Stage.” A look at some accessible research on four big social issues raised in Academy Award speeches last weekend.

Contexts: New Issue, New Site,” by Doug Hartmann. New editors Philip Cohen and Syed Ali have put out their first issue and launched the revamped contexts.org, hosted by thesocietypages.org.

There’s Research on That!

Extra! Extra! Read All about It, All the Time!” by Sarah Catherine Billups. A look at media saturation with research from Sara Goldrick-RabLauren SchuddeJennie E. Brand, Fabian T. PfefferMatthew CurryYu XieMina DadgarMadeline J. TrimbleChristopher Jepsen, Kenneth Troske, and Paul Coomes.

Who—and How—Community College Helps,” by Anne Kaduk and Amy August. A sociological primer on Obama’s plan to make two years of community college free, with work from Kenneth T. AndrewsNeal CarenRachel BestArnout van de Rijt, Eran Shor, Charles Ward, Steven SkienaKarin Wahl-Jorgensen, and Stephen Ostertag.

Citings & Sightings:

Cheap Gas Has Pricey Consequences,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Guangqing Chi on the way pump prices change driving habits.

God and Good Citizens,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Penny Edgell on the perceived tie between religion and morality.

Orphaned by Incarceration,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. When Sesame Street adds a character with a parent behind bars, Christopher Wildeman, Sara Wakefield, Kristin Turney, and John Hagan talk to The Nation.

Happily Never After? The Challenges of ‘Marrying Up’,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Scholar Jessi Streib discusses how cross-class marriages aren’t as common as they seem in the movies, but they certainly can, and do, work out in the real world.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

Naomi Sugie on Using Smartphones for Research,” with Sarah Esther Lageson. Naomi Sugie tells GMAC, “Smartphones have their limitations, but they… can expand the realm of empirical investigation for researchers to consider questions and ideas we just weren’t able to think about before…”

Contexts Magazine:

The Winter 2015 issue is brimming with goodies! Some are available on contexts.org, but the full issue is out from behind its paywall for another three weeks at contexts.sagepub.com.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Equal Pay? Not Yet for Mothers,” by Shelley J. Correll.

Scholars Strategy Network:

The Promising Launch of Community-Oriented Charter Schools in New Orleans,” by Brian R. Beabout and Joseph L. Boselovic.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s Weekly Roundup: Feb. 20, 2015

RU022015This week on TheSocietyPages.org

Office Hours Podcast:

Hahrie Han on Organizing Political Activists,” with Evan Stewart. Dr. Han discusses her latest book and the shaping of political movements.

Teaching TSP:

Intro to Sociological Methods Using the Reading List,” by Amy August. An exercise—with worksheets—designed to help students learn methods by distilling academic journal articles.

The Reading List:

The KKK’s Living Legacy,” by Evan Stewart. New research from Rory McVeigh, David Cunningham, and Justin Farrell shows the Klan’s activities in the ’60s continue to affect today’s Southern politics.

Citings & Sightings:

Self-Segregation in San Francisco Schools,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Studies find school choice works through parents’ social networks to segregate schools.

Working for the Long Weekend,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Long weekends make a great treat, but one sociologist argues adopting the schedule full-time wouldn’t help work-life balance.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Does Public Education Improve When Urban Districts Manage a ‘Portfolio’ of Schools?” by Katrina Buckley.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Men against Women, or the Top 20 Percent against the Bottom 80?” by Leslie McCall.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s Weekly Roundup: Friday the 13th (of February, 2015)

RU021315Not at all spooky, but always “soc-y.”

There’s Research on That!

Justifying Our Love,” by Jacqui Frost. Americans love love, even when it hurts. How have love and culture mingled to create modern “love”? Frost brings research from Eva Illouz, Ann Swidler, Francesca Cancian, and Anthony Giddens.

Vexed by Vaccination Refusals,” by Caty Taborda. Research on distrust of science and vaccinations, as well as network ties that spread medical knowledge—and sometimes skew it along the way.

The Editors’ Desk:

The New Yorker: Champion of Serious Sociology,” by Doug Hartmann. Admiring the work of Kelefa Sanneh, Jill Lepore, and Adam Gopnik, who are all bringing sociology’s big ideas to the Big Apple.

Give Methods a Chance:

Amy Schalet on In-Depth Interviews,” with Kyle Green. A leading sociologist on the methodology behind a time-consuming, but very rewarding, research technique.

Citings & Sightings:

Books Behind Bars: College Courses in Prisons,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Using reading for rehabilitation.

Could Porn Lead to Sex Trafficking?” by Caty Taborda. One researcher argues a correlation between consumption of pornography and demand for sex trafficking.

The Anti-Vaxxer Vote,” by Caty Taborda. Does vaccination refusal break along party lines?

Cheats in Cleats,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. When sports scandals break, are they amplified by public notions of sport as an almost sacred space?

Workplaces May Create Inequalities at Home,” by Caty Taborda. Bringing work home has more than one meaning.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Valentine’s Day Fact Sheet on Healthy Sex,” by Adina Nack.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Schools Adopting Digital Tools Without Evidence that They Boost Student Achievement,” by Patricia Burch, Annalee Good, Caroly J. Heinrich, and Chandi Wagner.

A Few from the Community Pages:

TSP’s Sociology Roundup: Feb. 5, 2015

RU020515This week on The Society Pages:

There’s Research on That!

Curbing Police Profiteering,” by Ryan Larson. New policies put the brakes on civil forfeiture. With research from Eric Blumenson, Eva Nilsen, John L. Worrall, and others.

Parents Prepping Kids for Racism,” by Lisa Gulya and Alex Manning. The NYTimes’ Charles Blow and NYC Mayor Bill deBlasio aren’t the only Americans who talk with their kids about expecting and reacting to discrimination. Research from Diane Hughes, Patricia Hill Collins, Cady Berkel, and Stephanie I. Coard.

The Reading List:

The Social Costs of Punishment, from Prisoners to Pupils,” by Jacqui Frost. Brea Perry and Edward Morris show how school suspensions lower all students’ achievement, even those who aren’t suspended.

Citings & Sightings:

2014: When Social Media Changed Sports Culture,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Dave Zirin on public pressures to address concussions and crimes, citing Harry Edwards from UC-Berkeley.

What Doulas Do,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. The social role and medical mediation work of doulas, citing Lisa Hall.

The Political and Cultural Problem of Paid Leave,” by Jack Delahanty. The NYTimes’ Upshot blog looks to Ruth Milkman‘s research on policies for working parents.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Learning about Commonalities Can Improve Student-Teacher Relationships and Boost Achievement,” by Hunter Gehlbach.

Council on Contemporary Families:

The Gender Pay Gap by Race and Ethnicity,” by Sarah Jane Glynn and Jane Ferrell.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s Sociology Roundup: January 30, 2015

RU013015This week has seen the beginning of the new semester at the University of Minnesota and new additions to our TSP graduate editorial board. Be sure to follow these up-and-comers as they begin to report and shape sociology in the public sphere!

The Editors’ Desk:

Public Criminology and the Social Media Echo Chamber,” by Chris Uggen. How Uggen approaches public appearances and truly translating sociology for different audiences.

There’s Research on That!

Taking Stock of Torture,” by Evan Stewart. When it comes to interrogation techniques, the choice to use torture has little to do with proven outcomes. Stewart looks to research by Randall Collins, Jared Del Rosso, John Hagan, Gabrielle Ferrales, Guillermina Jasso, and Diane Vaughan.

The Reading List:

Active Learning and STEM Success,” by Amy August. New research from Scott Freeman and his colleagues compare the outcomes of teaching techniques, and Nobel Prize winning physicist Carl Wieman says, “Sounds about right.” (I’m paraphrasing here…)

Citings & Sightings:

Trial Hype: The Different Allures of the Tsarnaev and Hernandez Cases,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. Northeastern University’s Jack Levin on how trials attract attention in specific ways.

Modeling: A Tough Job at Any Size,” by Sarah Catherine Billups. Sociologist Amanda Czerniawski has walked a mile—or at least a runway—in those shoes.

A Sociology of Celebrity Sanctions,” by Neeraj Rajasekar. UT-Austin prof Ari Adut chimes in on when corporate interests start taking an interest in celebrity crimes.

Women at the Top Find the View Depressing,” by Caty Taborda. Tetyana Pudrovska shares findings from her research on highly successful women.

Twitter Tension?” by Sarah Catherine Billups. When it comes to social media, it’s not all bad news, says sociologist Dhiraj Murthy in Smithsonian Magazine.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

David Knoke on Network Analysis,” with Sarah Esther Lageson.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Targeting Muslims in the Name of National Security,” by Saher Selod.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Child-Rearing Norms and Practices in Contemporary American Families,” by Sandra Hofferth.

The Youth and Beauty Mystique: Its Costs for Women and Men,” by Stephanie Coontz.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s First 2015 Sociology Roundup

Ru011215Oh, it’s time! Since we last checked in, TSP has been abuzz, taking on topics from the sociology of protest photos to the construction of consent, how to best build a diverse coalition, and the glorious launch of our latest podcast, “Give Methods a Chance”! Here’s the news you need to know (and some stuff that’s just plain interesting):

Features:

The Social Construction of Consent,” by Jill D. Weinberg. You can’t get to “yes” without first asking a question.

Between Protestors and Police: How a Photojournalist Got ‘The Shot’,” by Josh Page. Oakland photographer Noah Berger talks exclusively to TSP about catching a shot that went viral. Related: “‘I Can Breathe’ and the Occasional Fear of Photographing Protest,” by Steven W. Thrasher on the Contexts blog.

There’s Research on That!

New Tech Gifts Bring Festive Firewalls,” by Evan Stewart.”

The Reading List:

Shared Values and Common Dreams,” by Erik Kojola.

First Comes Love, Then Comes… Union Membership?” by Anne Kaduk.

Seeing Gentrification Using Google Street View,” by Stephen Suh.

Praying Away Group Difference,” by Jack Delehanty.

Citings & Sightings:

Suicide and the Loss of Employment and Identity,” by Erik Kojola.

Office Hours Podcast:

Tim Pippert on Diversity in College Recruitment Brochures,” with Matt Gunther.

Give Methods a Chance Podcast:

Deborah Carr on Longitudinal Studies,” with Sarah Esther Lageson.

Francesca Polletta on Coding Stories and Studying Online Forums,” with Kyle Green.

The Editors’ Desk:

“Best of… 2014″—Council on Contemporary Families Edition.

“Best of… 2014″—Contexts Blog Edition.

Methods are Beautiful,” by Chris Uggen.

“Best of… 2014″—Grad Board Edition.

Scholars Strategy Network:

Are Americans Really Anti-Intellectual?” by Aaron S. Lecklider.

Helping the Growing Ranks of Poor Immigrants Living in America’s Suburbs,” by Els de Graauw, Shannon Gleeson, and Irene Bloemraad.

The Roots of Multicultural Diversity in Revolutionary America,” by Ben Railton.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Lesbian Mystiques,” by Judith A. Howard.

Greater Acceptance, Persisting Antipathy: Catholic and Jewish Americans Since the Civil Rights Era,” by Jerry Park, Joshua Tom, and Brita Andercheck.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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Our Latest BookOwned, on the emerging sociology of debt, is now available from W.W. Norton & Co.

TSP’s Soc Roundup: Nov. 10, 2014

RU111014And here we thought it was just impolite to point at others… Since the last roundup, we weathered #pointergate, talked about bodies, learned that heterosexual marriages really are getting more egalitarian, and chatted up Michael Burawoy, that pioneering public sociologist. Binge read or save for the week, all we ask is that you share. TSP is free and accessible, and we want the whole world to put on their SocGoggles!

Features:

Troubling Bodies with Natalie Boero, C.J. Pascoe, and Abigail Saguy,” by Kyle Green. Too fat, too thin, unhealthy, brawny, boney, slutty, boyish, zaftig, and puny. Our societies have a lot to say about bodies; sociologists have a few comments of their own.

There’s Research on That!

#pointergate, Moral Panic, and Online Protest,” by Jack Delahanty. Media goes for sensationalism and social media allows marginalized groups to have bigger voices. Somewhere in the middle, a Minneapolis police group got the “outrage” they wanted and a backlash they didn’t expect.

Harassment Online and On the Street,” by Evan Stewart. Bullying, cat-calling, and the policing of norms and hierarchies—how discrimination and power combine in routine harassment.

Studying Whiteness: Not Beyond the Pale,” by Stephen Suh. When “white” is the neutral, default, or unmarked racial category, it’s easy to argue that society is “beyond race.”

Foraging in the Urban Jungle: Food Security and Homelessness,” by Matt Gunther. A police captain from Cincinnati says “don’t feed the bears [homeless people],” and at least 21 American cities agree. But does helping hunger really hinder social mobility?

The Reading List:

Second-Generation Schooling: Good News for Girls,” by Amy August. Sociology of Education reports that girls, given the opportunity to succeed, will seize it.

Office Hours:

Michael Burawoy on Global Social Movements,” with Erik Kojola. Exploring the future of social movements research within modern public universities.

The Editors’ Desk:

Facebook, Feelings, and Flight Attendants,” by Doug Hartmann. The managed heart at 50,000 feet and among 5 billion “friends.”

Face Work from Zellweger to Goffman,” by Doug Hartmann. Wearing our selves on our sleeves (if not our faces).

Teaching TSP:

Mediating Media Responses to Tragedy: Considering How Social Science Could Influence Policy.” An activity for talking through mass shootings in their cultural contexts.

Politics and Power.” Using Vincent Roscigno’s “Power, Sociologically Speaking” to debate popular notions of what power is, does, and should be.

Council on Contemporary Families:

Not Just Attitudes: Marriage is Also Becoming More Egalitarian,” by Christine R. Schwartz.

Trends in Global Gender Equity: Progress and Disappointments from around the World,” by Stephanie Seguino.

Scholars Strategy Network:

$2-a-Day Poverty in the United States,” by Luke Shaefer and Kathryn Edin.

Why America’s Food Is Still Not Safe,” by Adam Sheingate.

Forward or Back on Voting Rights? A Research Compendium,” by the Scholars Strategy Network.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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TSP’s Sociology Roundup: Oct. 27, 2014

RU102714Ooh, it’s almost Halloween! That means it’s time to for a few classics, including the annual holiday roundup from Sociological Images. Here’s what we’ve been up to this week:

Office Hours Podcasts:

Michael Burawoy on Global Social Movements,” with Matt Gunther.

There’s Research on That!

Gender Pay Gaps: The Silicon Ceiling?” by Anne Kaduk.

Citings & Sightings:

NFL’s Domestic Abuse Prevention Team Drafts Sociologist Beth Richie,” by Amy August.

Scholars Strategy Network:

How To Increase Voter Turnout in Communities Where People Have Not Usually Participated in Elections,” by Melissa R. Michelson.

Teaching TSP:

Politics and Power, A Classroom Exercise.” Related, “Power, Sociologically Speaking,” by Vincent J. Roscigno.

A Few from The Community Pages:

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TSP Roundup: Oct. 22, 2014

Ru102214A week’s worth of sociology, at your fingertips! It must be the future.

Features:

‘Technological Optimism': Egg-Freezing a Better Deal for Companies than for Women,” by Rene Almeling, Joanna Radin, and Sarah S. Richardson.

Teaching TSP:

Desistance and Reentry: An activity for the LCD classroom.”

Citings & Sightings:

Ebola Scares: When Panic is a Pathogen,” by Evan Stewart.

Pushing Secret Service Director Off the Glass Cliff?” by Matt Gunther.

There’s Research on That!

Tax Haven Mavens,” Erik Kojola.

Tactical Textbooks: The Politics of Teaching History,” by Jack Delahanty.

Linking Up with New Social Networks,” by Evan Stewart.

The Reading List:

The Social Construction of Funny,” by Stephen Suh.

The Council on Contemporary Families:

Not Everybody is Hooking Up at College—Here’s Why,” by Rachel Allison and Barbara Risman.

Civil Rights for Women, 1964–2014,” by Max Coleman.

Scholars Strategy Network:

To Understand Elective Officeholding by Minorities, Look at Who Runs for Election, Not Just Who Wins,” by Paru R. Shah.

Why Jobless Americans Experience Deep and Prolonged Distress,” by Cristobal Young.

A Few from the Community Pages:

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